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Action Figures

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NEWS
May 3, 1999 | by April Adamson, Daily News Staff Writer
An Ewok invasion it was not, but the turnout at Toys 'R' Us in Langhorne late last night for the launching of the new "Star Wars" trilogy toys was still impressive. About 150 customers crushed into the Langhorne store in the Oxford Valley Mall just after midnight and headed straight to the action figure display. And the Battle Droids went airborne. Buyers plunged into the displays and threw them back to friends who caught them and put them into shopping carts. Store personnel pleaded with them not to throw things, there was plenty of stock.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 19, 2013 | By Tirdad Derakhshani, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Weinstein Co. has put the kibosh on a line of Django Unchained action figures after protests from civil rights leaders that toys based on the violent, Jamie Foxx -starring, Quentin Tarantino -directed film trivialize the horrors of slavery. On Friday, the studio said it stopped release of the dolls despite its tradition of making dolls, meant for adults, to commemorate Tarantino pics, including Inglourious Basterds . A few lucky collectors stand to make a bundle: TMZ says 1,000 dolls were released before the plug was pulled.
NEWS
December 19, 2006 | By Tanya Barrientos INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
You could call them Bible Bratz, or He-Men for a Higher Authority. But Don Levine, who created the G.I. Joe doll in 1964, calls his new line of biblical action figures the Almighty Heroes. There's Queen Esther, a doe-eyed brunette hottie dressed in a shimmery pink ball gown with plenty of plastic gemstone bling. And Moses (before the beard years) with biceps as big as The Rock's and a righteous pharaoh headdress. There's Deborah the Warrior, who looks remarkably like Jessica Simpson the Warbler.
BUSINESS
April 8, 1996 | By Claire Furia, FOR THE INQUIRER
Equipped with disguises, listening devices and satellite dishes, Jim Osborne feels prepared to embark on his perilous assignment. Because of its risky nature, the venture had been turned down by much larger enterprises than Osborne's, such as Mattel Inc. and Hasbro Corp. Osborne, who owns a novelty-gift business, said he seized the opportunity in order to get his "feet wet" in toy licensing. He is confident that his new spy-action figures, based on the upcoming action thriller Mission: Impossible, will be as big a hit as the Paramount Pictures flick opening May 22. "Retailers have looked at the movie, and they all think it will be a blockbuster," said Osborne, president and owner of Tradewinds Enterprises Inc., of Springfield Township, Montgomery County.
NEWS
March 28, 1995 | BY DAVE BARRY
As an American, I am ticked off about Sailor Moon. What is Sailor Moon, you ask? Shut up and I will tell you. Sailor Moon is a licensed-cartoon-character merchandising concept that is about to be dumped on us by the people who brought us the Mighty Morphin Power Rangers. If you've never heard of the Mighty Morphin Power Rangers, go to a window right now, open it, and listen. You'll hear the high-pitched, irritating sound of small children all over America demanding in whiny voices that their parents take out second mortgages so that they can buy official Power Rangers action figures, lunch boxes, backpacks, underwear, snow tires, forklifts, assault rifles, ponies, marital aids, members of Congress, and hundreds of other licensed spinoff products.
NEWS
November 23, 1999 | By Mike Hudson, INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
The adult ratings of blood-and-guts video games keep them out of children's hands at most stores. But any child can buy blood-splattered, gun-toting action figures based on these same games, and critics say manufacturers are marketing those toys to underage children. "A 'mature' rating for a video game is equal to an 'R' rating" for a movie, cautioned Daphne White, director of the Lion and Lamb Project, which released its annual list of violent toys yesterday. The project is financed by the Tides Center, a liberal foundation based in San Francisco.
NEWS
August 15, 2003 | By Sandy Bauers INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
"Look," Matt Black says, bending the arm of a miniature Steven Seagal. "Double-jointed elbows. " Better for posing. He adjusts Harrison Ford's Blade Runner coat and fishes through a bag that rattles with weaponry, coming up with a tiny Walther PPK to put in Sean Connery's hand and a light sword for his Jedi knight. When Matt Black is playing with his dolls - OK, arranging his "action figures" - it's the details that matter. The figures are just one-sixth scale, a six-foot human represented by a foot-high doll.
NEWS
May 20, 2002 | By Paddy Noyes FOR THE INQUIRER
Johnny, 12, likes playing basketball, football and video games. He also enjoys swimming, hiking, listening to music on the radio, and drawing action figures from television. One talent he is working to perfect is magic. His main area of expertise so far is card tricks. There is neglect in Johnny's background, and he receives therapy to help him manage his anger, control impulsive behavior, and express his feelings. He receives medication for an attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder.
NEWS
July 8, 2000
If you poke your head outside this morning, something might seem to be missing - the sounds of children laughing, skating, biking, playing. On this day of days, Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire day, many kids are curled up on a couch, a bed, a hammock, devouring the fourth installment of J.K. Rowling's fantasy series. By now, even adults who lived in happy ignorance of Muggles, Quidditch and other Potterisms while Ms. Rowling's first three novels enthralled the young have picked up on the sensation.
NEWS
December 3, 1996 | By Jennifer Inez Ward, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
G.I. Joe is not a hero to everyone. As a response to the growing rate of violence among the young, the Bucks County Peace Center held its seventh annual Peaceful Toy and Craft Fair Friday. More than 200 parents and children attended. As part of the fair, a toy weapons turn-in was held. More than 42 toys were exchanged for puzzles and arts-and-crafts toys donated by Zany Brainy stores. Many action figures and other toys deal with problems through violence, said Maureen Camphire, associate director of the Bucks County Peace Center.
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ENTERTAINMENT
January 25, 2013 | By Monica Peters, For The Inquirer
MetroKids presents its fifth annual Super Camp Fair on Sunday at the Conshohocken Marriott, where families can select camp activities for their children. From 1 to 4 p.m., the free fair will have exhibitors from more than 60 specialty and day programs, and parents can meet with camp directors and staff. The fair features programs from the Main Line and western suburbs, and also highlights overnight camps from around the country. Guests can watch live demonstrations and also have chances to win camp scholarships, raffles, and prizes.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 19, 2013 | By Tirdad Derakhshani, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Weinstein Co. has put the kibosh on a line of Django Unchained action figures after protests from civil rights leaders that toys based on the violent, Jamie Foxx -starring, Quentin Tarantino -directed film trivialize the horrors of slavery. On Friday, the studio said it stopped release of the dolls despite its tradition of making dolls, meant for adults, to commemorate Tarantino pics, including Inglourious Basterds . A few lucky collectors stand to make a bundle: TMZ says 1,000 dolls were released before the plug was pulled.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 9, 2013 | By Howard Gensler
A LINE OF action figures based on the characters from "Django Unchained" have recently gone on sale ($34.99 retail), but Najee Ali wants them taken off the market. Ali, director of the advocacy group Project Islamic Hope, in conjunction with other Los Angeles black community leaders, called for the removal of the toys and said they're "a slap in the face of our ancestors" that "trivializes the horrors of slavery. " But do they really? More than the film itself? Did the action figures made for Quentin Tarantino 's last film, "Inglourious Basterds," trivialize the horrors of the Nazis?
NEWS
December 17, 2010 | By Kia Gregory, Inquirer Staff Writer
Sitting near the Christmas tree in his Kensington home, Big Billy Howell cupped his hand over his cell phone and yelled the news - "We got 36 more dollars!" - to his once-broken buddies. Howell was surrounded by Joe the Mouth; the Island, a colossus of a man in Cowboys blue; dark-haired Dave F; Johnny the Real Deal; and the wiry Uncle Skunkel. The half-dozen men are all "Kenzos," bonded through blue-collar ties and years of sitting together in a church basement at alcohol- and drug-recovery meetings.
SPORTS
November 8, 2010 | By Phil Sheridan, Inquirer Columnist
In his first game back from that terrifying concussion shot, DeSean Jackson said that worry did creep into his mind - but only when quarterback Michael Vick was running. "Scary," Jackson said. "I don't want him to get hurt. I always tell him, protect yourself, don't take no hits. " Vick and Jackson were both sidelined after the kind of hits that leave the body hurting and the mind reeling. Vick was sandwiched between two Washington defenders so severely that the cartilage connecting his ribs was torn.
NEWS
October 31, 2010 | By Kevin Riordan, Inquirer Columnist
At Tony Arena's house in Audubon, it's always Halloween. Especially in "The Monster Room," where his extensive collection of classic horror and sci-fi memorabilia - everything from dinosaurs to Dracula to a universe of space aliens - is on glorious display. The posters, dioramas, trading cards, and action figures reflect the breadth and depth of one man's labor of love. He started about 40 years ago and is nowhere near finished. "I got into all this by watching Dr. Shock and Creature Double Feature ," says Arena, 55, referring to the showcases of classic and not-so-classic horror films broadcast regularly on Philadelphia TV stations in the 1960s and '70s.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 8, 2009 | By Karla K. Albertson FOR THE INQUIRER
For dedicated fans, the Star Trek adventures on television and film show an optimistic blueprint for the 21st century. The flip side of science fiction might be the industrial grimness of a film like Alien, but it's the crew of the Starship Enterprise that offers diversity, positive ideals, and a strong prime directive that promises a harmonious future. That goodness brings the series into the hearts of collectors. John Tenuto, collectible editor of trekmovie.com, is among the fans who consider finding memorabilia from Star Trek a family passion, one shared by his wife and son. On the site - launched in July 2006 to follow the movie that opened this week - Tenuto reviews collectibles and toys and serves as the resident "Shatnerologist," covering anything connected with the original Captain Kirk actor, William Shatner.
NEWS
April 20, 2009 | By Patricia Mans FOR THE INQUIRER
Intelligent, charming, and outgoing, Brian participates in a wide range of activities. The 10-year-old enjoys being outdoors, riding his bike, and playing sports. A video-game enthusiast, he delights in visiting arcades and testing his skills. Another pastime involves his collection of remote-controlled cars, which he adeptly maneuvers. Brian also has a creative side. When given wrestling action figures, he used his imagination to make an arena for them. He has a good appetite and is eager to try different foods.
LIVING
July 18, 2008 | By Karla Klein Albertson FOR THE INQUIRER
Hellboy stomped his movieplex competition last weekend, and Batman has unfurled his cape again. Just the occasion for snapping up the kind of high-end collectibles that translate pop culture into fine art. Most are limited editions, ranging from good-quality action figures that go for less than $50 to life-size replicas priced at $5,000 to $6,000. It's tempting to think of pop art only in terms of Andy Warhol and the '60s. But now his work is considered fine art - four of Warhol's famous commercial shipping boxes (Brillo, anyone?
NEWS
February 4, 2008 | By Patricia Mans FOR THE INQUIRER
A very energetic 7-year-old, Alex has a variety of interests. He loves being outside, on his bike or scooter. Next to playing outdoors, his favorite activity is listening to music and singing along with the recording artists. He also enjoys watching cartoons, testing his skills at card games and playing with his action figures, especially Spider-Man and Batman. In his foster placement, Alex has taken on the responsibility of keeping his room clean and helping sweep the floors.
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