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ENTERTAINMENT
July 10, 1992 | By Art Carey, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER Listings compiled by Maggie Galehouse
The population of the world is about 5 billion, and basically all those people can be divided into two categories: Watchers and doers. Doers are responsible for civilization as we know it. It is they who embrace life, imparting energy and enthusiasm, seeking to test themselves, mentally and physically, and generating those felicitous moments of sociability that make all the sham and misery seem worth it. Watchers aren't bad people; it's...
NEWS
April 23, 2012 | By Patricia Mans, For THE INQUIRER
Justin says that what he likes most about himself is the way he acts, the way he reads, and the way he is nice to others. Always on the go, the 7-year-old is involved in many activities, including singing, playing video games, and watching cartoons. He is also fond of sports, especially basketball and bowling. Justin loves his bedroom's astronomy theme and he enjoys learning about the solar system and the planets. In school, he attends second grade and is a good student. His favorite subjects are math, computer, and gym. When he grows up, Justin wants to be a police officer, so he was thrilled to visit the Philadelphia Police Academy recently.
NEWS
February 16, 2006 | By Kristin E. Holmes INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Morton W. Rimerman, 76, of Rose Valley, a retired treasurer and vice president at Peco Energy Co. in Philadelphia, died of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis Tuesday at Crozer-Chester Medical Center. Mr. Rimerman was diagnosed with what is known as Lou Gehrig's disease in the spring but worked hard to maintain an active life, especially staying involved in his many charitable activities. He would go to meetings at Magee Rehabilitation Hospital in his wheelchair. He had served on the board of trustees since 1988, raised more than $1 million for the hospital, and was integral in patient-safety and medication-delivery efforts.
NEWS
June 30, 1991 | By Lynn Hamilton, Special to The Inquirer
Female Kuwaiti resistance fighters booby-trapped cars and passed through Iraqi checkpoints with hidden ammunition wrapped around their bodies or sewn into rice bags, according to historian and scholar Margot Badran. "Space, time, and tasks were re-gendered," said Badran, who spoke Thursday at Penn State Great Valley as part of the university's 1991 cultural heritage series. Badran, an Annenberg Research Institute Fellow, arrived in Kuwait two weeks after its liberation. For almost a month, she traveled throughout the country and its environs, hearing the accounts of women who experienced the occupation.
NEWS
August 29, 1990 | By Penny Jeannechild, Special to The Inquirer
Twice a week, 70-year-old Herman Garber runs and rows and stretches and sits up and lies down and bikes and curls and pumps and pumps and pumps iron. He's no Arnold Schwarzenegger, but Garber doesn't pump for star status. He's pumping for a healthy heart. After bypass surgery in 1980, he was told no more than "to do a lot of walking," said Garber, of Rhawnhurst. About two years ago, just before his wife died, he looked at his 175-pound body and his 40-inch waist and "wised up. " Out went the cake and ice cream; in came the complex carbohydrates.
LIVING
May 25, 1986 | By Stewart M. Beltz, Special to The Inquirer
For hundreds of years, men and women have searched the world over for the secret of a long and healthy life - from Ponce de Leon's elusive "Fountain of Youth" to Ronald Reagan's secret to his productive "golden years. " Recent evidence suggests that the methods to achieve a long and healthy life are right before us. In what is believed to be the most comprehensive study ever conducted on the relationship between exercise and longevity, physical activity has been found to be a critical factor in determining life span and death rate.
NEWS
September 21, 2000 | By Jennifer Moroz, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Mayor Mary Duffy wants to put the rumor mill to rest: Yes, she is sick, but, no, she is not on her deathbed. Sitting in her office yesterday, Duffy, 59, confirmed that she has "a rare form of leukemia. " Like all cancers, it is life threatening, but Duffy said that her prognosis was good and that she remained optimistic. "I haven't let it stop me," the mayor said. "People who know me know I'm a strong individual. " The cancer was diagnosed in late spring after she went to see her doctor complaining of fatigue.
NEWS
May 30, 1995 | By Joyce Vottima Hellberg, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Some broken hearts can be mended. Just ask Jim McCall. His first heart attack was in 1964. He resumed his active life without difficulty. Then, in 1982, clogged arteries in his heart required McCall to have quadruple heart bypass surgery. Once again, McCall resumed his life, playing golf and tennis and working as an insurance underwriter. It seemed as if he were doing everything right - then he had a stroke in 1992. Just when his morale began to sink, he found out about Mended Hearts.
NEWS
January 21, 1995 | By S. Joseph Hagenmayer, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
John H. Mayer, 58, who overcame the debilitating effects of childhood polio to become a swimming coach, guidance counselor and community leader, died Tuesday at West Jersey Hospital-Voorhees. Mr. Mayer was a lifelong resident of Laurel Springs, and a member of the borough Planning Board. He retired in June as a guidance counselor at the Camden County Vocational and Technical School's Gloucester Campus, where he had worked since it opened in 1970. Before that, he had taught English and history at the school's Pennsauken Campus beginning in 1967.
NEWS
July 29, 2010 | By JOHN F. MORRISON, morrisj@phillynews.com 215-854-5573
YOU WOULD have been advised to pay attention when Rudolph "Scooty" Eason Sr. offered diet advice. He celebrated his 100th birthday May 25, as alert and feisty as ever, a milestone he attributed to his religious faith, work ethic and diet. He believed that breakfast is the most important meal of the day, and he favored a big bowl of oatmeal to get the system geared up for the day's work. "He told people to drink plenty of water and eat green vegetables to keep their system regulated and flushed," his family said.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
TRAVEL
April 21, 2013 | By Liz Sidoti, Associated Press
RINCON, Puerto Rico - Several years ago, I found myself needing a certain type of vacation - one that would help me reset life and that combined my passions: fitness and sports, the outdoors and travel, healthy food and new people. I wanted much of the planning done for me. I also wanted the ability to break from any itinerary. And I wanted to go alone without feeling lonely. A reasonable cost, a variety of activities, and a warm location also were important. So I started searching online for "active vacations" and "fitness trips" and "wellness retreats.
NEWS
March 3, 2013
Caring heart calms a mom's fears On a January morning more than 30 years ago, my 7-year-old daughter awoke with a badly swollen face and nearly closed eye - a condition that had us rushing to Children's Hospital of Philadelphia. There, we learned that pink eye had turned into orbital cellulitis, a potentially life-threatening illness ("C. Everett Koop always put patients' health first," Feb. 27). I was given a cot next to my little girl's bed in a large room on the cancer ward, the only bed available.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 14, 2012 | Art Carey
Edward Moore was visiting Bermuda when he saw a girl windsurfing. It looked like fun, so he took a lesson and began windsurfing himself. He was 60 at the time. One of his treasured possessions is a photograph of himself windsurfing on the Delaware River. When the photo was taken, he was 76, and he has continued to enjoy the sport since then. In September, Moore, who lives in Woodbury, will turn 95. Three years ago, he underwent surgery for a total replacement of his right knee. His motivation: He wanted to continue living a full and active life, including windsurfing and dancing.
NEWS
April 23, 2012 | By Patricia Mans, For THE INQUIRER
Justin says that what he likes most about himself is the way he acts, the way he reads, and the way he is nice to others. Always on the go, the 7-year-old is involved in many activities, including singing, playing video games, and watching cartoons. He is also fond of sports, especially basketball and bowling. Justin loves his bedroom's astronomy theme and he enjoys learning about the solar system and the planets. In school, he attends second grade and is a good student. His favorite subjects are math, computer, and gym. When he grows up, Justin wants to be a police officer, so he was thrilled to visit the Philadelphia Police Academy recently.
NEWS
July 29, 2010 | By JOHN F. MORRISON, morrisj@phillynews.com 215-854-5573
YOU WOULD have been advised to pay attention when Rudolph "Scooty" Eason Sr. offered diet advice. He celebrated his 100th birthday May 25, as alert and feisty as ever, a milestone he attributed to his religious faith, work ethic and diet. He believed that breakfast is the most important meal of the day, and he favored a big bowl of oatmeal to get the system geared up for the day's work. "He told people to drink plenty of water and eat green vegetables to keep their system regulated and flushed," his family said.
NEWS
July 25, 2010
Susan B. Schaffer is the oldest of three daughters of Beatrice Belopolsky, of Burlington My mother was my best friend. As she approached 90 years old in excellent health, I occasionally wondered how this woman, who continued to live life with such fierce independence, would eventually leave this earth. The matriarch of a family of three daughters, she had continued living a full life after being widowed 30 years before. She served actively on community boards, lent a hand with her six grandchildren whenever she could, and traveled the world in her unique style.
NEWS
December 30, 2007 | By Sally Friedman FOR THE INQUIRER
It looked like any holiday social scene - people greeting, laughing, talking, and later sharing a meal. But the crowd at Bertucci's at Cherry Hill Mall one recent evening had a slightly different tilt. These were members of Good Company, a group of senior citizens committed to sharing one another's lives as friends and companions without the pressure of dating. "We are definitely not a singles dating group," said Barbara Greenbaum, one of the founders of Good Company, who oversees the 100-member group without an official title.
NEWS
December 13, 2006 | By Susan Snyder, Kathy Boccella and Christine Schiavo INQUIRER STAFF WRITERS
Sixteen-year-old Shane Halligan tried to keep his report card from his parents. But they found it in his backpack on Monday, and did what parents do. They said he'd have to cut back on the volunteer firefighting he loved so much and forgo a National Guard boot camp this summer. So, while his parents slept, Halligan - a junior at Springfield Township High School in Montgomery County, an Eagle Scout, an experienced target-shooter - set into motion a plan to end his life, authorities said yesterday.
NEWS
February 16, 2006 | By Kristin E. Holmes INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Morton W. Rimerman, 76, of Rose Valley, a retired treasurer and vice president at Peco Energy Co. in Philadelphia, died of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis Tuesday at Crozer-Chester Medical Center. Mr. Rimerman was diagnosed with what is known as Lou Gehrig's disease in the spring but worked hard to maintain an active life, especially staying involved in his many charitable activities. He would go to meetings at Magee Rehabilitation Hospital in his wheelchair. He had served on the board of trustees since 1988, raised more than $1 million for the hospital, and was integral in patient-safety and medication-delivery efforts.
NEWS
April 16, 2005 | By Kathy Boccella INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
At a time in life when many Jewish children are preparing for their bar mitzvahs, Stephen Michaels was mourning the death of his parents, killed in a plane crash in England. Although his parents were very active in their Highland Park, Ill., synagogue, they did not believe in religious rituals, so the developmentally disabled 12-year-old skipped the adolescent rite of passage. But Michaels grew into a man who lives a full and active life, despite some mental and, more recently, physical challenges.
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