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Acupuncture

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NEWS
June 14, 1990 | By Amanda Agee, Special to The Inquirer
While skeptics still shrug their shoulders at the improbability of a mere needle affecting a cure, it was the inadequacies of Western medicine that led a Main Line physician to begin specializing in acupuncture. "When you're in training as a doctor, you feel you have everything you need from what you learned in school," according to Murray Dorfman, who received his doctorate in medicine from New York Medical College in 1949. "But the longer you're in practice, the more you realize that you don't have all the answers.
NEWS
November 16, 2015
Q: My dog has been getting acupuncture for arthritis, and it really seems to help. I'm curious how it works. A: Acupuncture is the insertion of fine, thin needles into the skin at strategic points on the body. In traditional Chinese medicine, these points were known as meridians, through which "chi," or life force, flowed; in modern medicine, we know them as the vascular, nervous and muscular structures of the body. Insertion of the needles at specific points is said to help activate healing by stimulating nerve endings and releasing certain substances that relieve pain, reduce inflammation and improve blood flow and oxygenation.
NEWS
September 11, 2012 | By Lindsey Tanner, Associated Press
CHICAGO - Acupuncture gets a thumbs-up for helping relieve pain from chronic headaches, backaches and arthritis in a review of more than two dozen studies - the latest analysis of an often-studied therapy that has as many fans as critics. Some believe its only powers are a psychological, placebo effect. But some doctors believe even if that's the explanation for acupuncture's effectiveness, there's no reason not to offer it if it makes people feel better. The new analysis examined 29 studies involving almost 18,000 adults.
NEWS
August 1, 2011 | By Paul Jablow, For The Inquirer
In May 2005, it seemed like an intriguing match. The University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine announced a partnership with the Tai Sophia Institute, a center for complementary and alternative medicine based in Laurel, Md. The collaboration sought to combine Penn's expertise in traditional, evidence-based Western medicine with Tai Sophia's strengths in non-Western therapies such as acupuncture. But resistance on the Penn campus was fierce. Neal Nathanson, a Penn epidemiologist who echoed the views of many, called the collaboration "a return to voodoo medicine" and said in a recent interview that it "put us in bed with an outfit that we didn't support in terms of the principles.
NEWS
February 19, 1989 | By Susan FitzGerald, Inquirer Staff Writer
Faced with an exploding cocaine epidemic that shows no sign of slowing, the city may soon turn to the ancient Chinese therapy of acupuncture to treat coke addicts. Drug treatment centers around the country that are using acupuncture report that it has a calming effect on addicts, reduces their cravings for drugs and helps them overcome their addiction when combined with traditional counseling and rehabilitation therapy. But many medical experts are still skeptical, saying there is little documented scientific evidence to support the contention that sticking needles in an addict's ears does any good.
NEWS
April 20, 1989 | By Susan FitzGerald, Inquirer Staff Writer
Cocaine addicts seeking to overcome their drug dependency will soon be able to turn to the ancient Chinese therapy of acupuncture. A city-funded acupuncture clinic for the treatment of cocaine addicts is scheduled to open this summer at Giuffre Medical Center, in North Philadelphia. The clinic, the first of its kind in this area, will mark a dramatic departure from traditional methods of drug treatment. Mark Bencivengo, head of the city's drug and alcohol treatment programs, said yesterday that the city was turning to acupuncture because conventional outpatient treatment programs had been largely ineffective in rehabilitating cocaine addicts.
NEWS
April 7, 1991 | By Jeanne Daniels, Special to The Inquirer
Dr. De Forrest W. Marchant wouldn't admit to himself that it was time to stop smoking until his 4-year-old granddaughter sat on his lap one day and asked him when he was going to do it. He had stopped smoking for six years but began smoking three packs a day 15 years ago. Stopping on his own didn't seem to be the answer, so Marchant tried acupuncture. He has not smoked now for 15 months. "It was the hardest thing I ever did," said Marchant, chief of the division of obstetrics at Lankenau Hospital.
NEWS
June 29, 2016 | By Sam Wood, Staff Writer
Children's Hospital of Philadelphia will offer acupuncture to all of its patients beginning in July, joining a growing number of pediatric medical centers providing alternative therapies. The hospital plans to add other unconventional options, including therapeutic massage and aromatherapy, in the next year, said Maria R. Mascarenhas, medical director of the new Integrative Health Program. "Our patients and families have been asking for it and seeking these therapies outside of CHOP," said Mascarenhas.
NEWS
April 25, 1990 | By Mary Flannery, Daily News Staff Writer
With little fanfare but a great deal of anticipation, the first acupuncture program for drug addicts in Pennsylvania is set to begin Monday at Girard Medical Center, formerly Guiffre Medical Center, in North Philadelphia. Five crack addicts will be the first of at least 100 to receive acupuncture treatments along with traditional counseling sessions under a new, city- funded program. Sitting in brand new recliners in a Girard lounge overlooking blossoming cheery trees, patients will receive a 45-minute acupuncture treatment each weekday for two weeks.
NEWS
July 6, 1995 | By Andrea Hamilton, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Morrie Breyer drives his pets more than an hour from his home in Mount Pleasant, N.J., to see Deva Kaur Khalsa at her Edgewood Village Veterinary Clinic. There are other vets closer to his home, but Khalsa's practice is unusual. She uses acupuncture, homeopathy, chiropractic and herbal treatments. Khalsa also uses traditional treatments, such as surgery and antibiotics. Breyer's 13-year-old yellow Labrador retriever, Emma, stood patiently in Khalsa's examining room, unperturbed by the short, fine needles sticking into her paws and legs.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
June 29, 2016 | By Sam Wood, Staff Writer
Children's Hospital of Philadelphia will offer acupuncture to all of its patients beginning in July, joining a growing number of pediatric medical centers providing alternative therapies. The hospital plans to add other unconventional options, including therapeutic massage and aromatherapy, in the next year, said Maria R. Mascarenhas, medical director of the new Integrative Health Program. "Our patients and families have been asking for it and seeking these therapies outside of CHOP," said Mascarenhas.
NEWS
November 16, 2015
Q: My dog has been getting acupuncture for arthritis, and it really seems to help. I'm curious how it works. A: Acupuncture is the insertion of fine, thin needles into the skin at strategic points on the body. In traditional Chinese medicine, these points were known as meridians, through which "chi," or life force, flowed; in modern medicine, we know them as the vascular, nervous and muscular structures of the body. Insertion of the needles at specific points is said to help activate healing by stimulating nerve endings and releasing certain substances that relieve pain, reduce inflammation and improve blood flow and oxygenation.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 15, 2015 | By Anndee Hochman, For The Inquirer
Dan was sure he did not want to conceive more children. Sure enough to have a vasectomy nine years ago. But that was before the divorce, before the joint custody arrangement that meant seeing his kids less than half the time, and before he ventured onto OkCupid and found Mary, who loved indie music, camping . . . and children. They e-mailed for two months - never talking on the phone, which both of them find "awkward" - before they met. Mary planned a date with an easy escape clause; she proposed that they meet for drinks at PJ Ryan's, just downstairs from her apartment.
NEWS
September 22, 2014 | By Art Carey, For The Inquirer
Crawford Hill is a mountaineer and rock climber who enjoys outdoor exercise. For the last three years, pain in his lower back has curtailed such pleasures. In fact, when he walks on level ground, he must stop and stretch every quarter-mile, and when he walks uphill, the pain brings him to a halt. Seeking relief, Hill had back surgery last year and has tried stretching, physical therapy, epidurals, chiropractic, acupuncture, Feldenkrais, and cranial-sacral bodywork. All to no avail.
NEWS
September 29, 2013 | By Stacey Burling, Inquirer Staff Writer
Donna Ialeggio, a staff veterinarian at the Philadelphia Zoo, has been trying to cure a black-necked swan's bumblefoot for 31/2 years. She's finally found something that seems to be working: acupuncture. "The speed with which this is healing is just phenomenal," she said Wednesday as she watched Christina Fuoco, a vet in private practice with training in acupuncture and canine rehabilitation, prepare to treat Jackson, a nine-year-old swan. The back of his pale pink foot - what would be a heel in humans - had a hard, swollen lump that was once badly infected and three or four times larger.
NEWS
September 11, 2012 | By Lindsey Tanner, Associated Press
CHICAGO - Acupuncture gets a thumbs-up for helping relieve pain from chronic headaches, backaches and arthritis in a review of more than two dozen studies - the latest analysis of an often-studied therapy that has as many fans as critics. Some believe its only powers are a psychological, placebo effect. But some doctors believe even if that's the explanation for acupuncture's effectiveness, there's no reason not to offer it if it makes people feel better. The new analysis examined 29 studies involving almost 18,000 adults.
NEWS
October 3, 2011 | By Paul Jablow, FOR THE INQUIRER
For breast cancer survivors like Marie McCrone, the worry never quite stops. Despite a lumpectomy and lymph node removal in 2002, she feared recurrence of the cancer or the onset of lymphedema, a painful swelling of the arm that can occur long after surgery. "I heard all sorts of horror stories about it," recalls McCrone, 52, of Warrington, Bucks County. "How you might get it just from lifting a grocery bag. " Four years later, she heard about a weightlifting program for breast cancer survivors being tested at the University of Pennsylvania..
NEWS
August 1, 2011 | By Paul Jablow, For The Inquirer
In May 2005, it seemed like an intriguing match. The University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine announced a partnership with the Tai Sophia Institute, a center for complementary and alternative medicine based in Laurel, Md. The collaboration sought to combine Penn's expertise in traditional, evidence-based Western medicine with Tai Sophia's strengths in non-Western therapies such as acupuncture. But resistance on the Penn campus was fierce. Neal Nathanson, a Penn epidemiologist who echoed the views of many, called the collaboration "a return to voodoo medicine" and said in a recent interview that it "put us in bed with an outfit that we didn't support in terms of the principles.
NEWS
February 21, 2011
New evidence that zinc might zap common-cold symptoms The common cold doesn't get a lot of press, but it causes plenty of misery and is estimated to be responsible for 40 percent of missed workdays. And there is no proven treatment. There is, however, zinc - a mineral that inhibits rhinovirus replication and has been in and out of favor since researchers first suggested it for colds in 1984. A review of 15 high-quality studies involving a total of 1,360 people published last week by the Cochrane Library, a respected medical clearinghouse, found strong support.
NEWS
February 23, 2005 | By Virginia A. Smith INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Nothing worked for Don Underwood - not surgery or painkillers, muscle relaxants or physical therapy, steroid injections or massage. Nothing stopped the debilitating back spasms he'd suffered for almost four decades - until he met Anna D. Lee of Cherry Hill, a physician who treated him with an automated needle gun invented by her engineer husband. The needle was inserted into his throbbing back, causing the muscles to twitch and then relax, a painful procedure that over time brought sustained relief.
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