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Acute Care

NEWS
May 21, 1993 | By Jamal Bennett, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Members of a community task force seeking to maintain Zurbrugg Hospital as an acute-care facility are threatening legal action to conduct an audit of the hospital's financial situation. In a continuing campaign to preserve acute-care beds and several facilities at Zurbrugg Hospital, members of the Riverside Hospital Task Force met Wednesday and accused officials of Graduate Health System of Philadelphia of conducting "a charade" about the hospital's future. At issue is the hospital's fiscal health and whether it actually lost $14 million since Graduate Health System acquired it in 1988.
NEWS
March 31, 1993 | By Anne Tergesen, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
The company that manages Zurbrugg Hospital in Riverside and Rancocas Hospital in Willingboro said yesterday that it has shelved a plan to shutter the facilities and build a new hospital. Both Zurbrugg and Rancocas will remain open, said officials with Graduate Health Systems of Philadelphia. However, the configuration of services they offer will change. "That's not going forward," Graduate chairman and chief executive officer Harold Cramer said of the prospect of constructing a new hospital.
NEWS
March 7, 1993 | By Anne Tergesen, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Like many township residents, sisters Ruth Duffy and Margaret Maute have rallied since last spring against twin threats to one of the town's most venerable institutions: the state's bid to convert Zurbrugg Hospital into a psychiatric facility and the hospital's announcement that financial pressures may force it to close or severely scale back its acute-care services. While a recent court decision prevents the state from implementing its plan, Graduate Health System of Philadelphia, which manages Zurbrugg, has yet to decide the hospital's fate.
NEWS
June 30, 1992 | By Rich Heidorn Jr., INQUIRER TRENTON BUREAU This article contains information from the Associated Press
Zurbrugg Hospital's Riverside Division won an apparent reprieve yesterday as the legislature voted to emasculate a state plan that would have forced the closing of the hospital's acute-care unit. The Senate voted, 28-6, to override Gov. Florio's veto of a bill that makes the State Health Plan advisory and restricts the Health Department's ability to pass regulations to enforce the plan. The Assembly overrode the veto, 58-3, last week. Florio immediately denounced the action as unconstitutional and asked Attorney General Robert J. Del Tufo for advice on filing a court challenge.
NEWS
May 14, 1992 | By Louise Harbach, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Riverside residents and Zurbrugg Hospital employees are hoping that a bill approved by the state Legislature last week will keep the hospital intact, but officials involved acknowledge that their battle is far from over. "I'm elated that the bill passed," said Mayor Robert Renshaw, who had helped organize rallies in Trenton to save the hospital. "Now we have the time to get together to reach a compromise that's in the best interest of the community and Zurbrugg. " It was also good news to Joseph Hernberg, a radiologist at Zurbrugg who led a lobbying effort by doctors to keep acute-care beds at the hospital.
NEWS
March 22, 1992 | By Lillian Micko, SPECIAL TO THE INQUIRER
Doctors at Zurbrugg Memorial Hospital in Riverside are establishing a war chest to fight the state's recommended transformation of the facility's mission as acute-care provider. Joseph Hernberg, a radiologist, said last week that the active medical staff of about 150 has agreed to pay $140 more than the normal yearly association dues of $60 to yield about $21,000 for a lobbying effort in Trenton. Among the aims the lobby would pursue on the doctors' behalf, Hernberg said, is the promotion of legislation introduced March 16 by Assemblyman Jose Sosa (R., Burlington-Camden)
NEWS
March 13, 1992 | By Rich Heidorn Jr., INQUIRER TRENTON BUREAU
Republican legislators moved yesterday to put the brakes on a state plan to shut down six acute care hospitals and 20 pediatric hospital units, including Zurbrugg Hospital's 110 acute care beds in Riverside. The closings, called for in the proposed State Health Plan, also would affect Zurbrugg's 20-bed pediatric unit in its Rancocas Valley division and pediatric units at Kennedy Memorial Hospitals/Stratford Division; Underwood- Memorial Hospital in Woodbury; Atlantic City Medical Center-Mainland Division in Pomona, and South Jersey Hospital Systems/Bridgeton Division.
NEWS
December 28, 1991 | By Nancy Phillips, Inquirer Staff Writer
With much fanfare, officials at Cooper Hospital-University Medical Center announced yesterday that they want to build a children's hospital in Camden - perhaps by 1995. That was not news to the crowd of legislators and doctors who gathered in a balloon-filled room to hear hospital president Kevin G. Halpern herald the plan. Nor was it a surprise to Health Commissioner Frances J. Dunston, who traveled from Trenton to endorse the idea. In fact, the ceremony formalized a goal first announced in 1987, when then- Gov. Thomas H. Kean designated Cooper as the site of the state's second acute-care hospital for children.
BUSINESS
July 12, 1991 | By Gilbert M. Gaul, Inquirer Staff Writer
The on-again, off-again merger of the Graduate Health System and Community General Hospital is on again. The board of trustees of Community General, a 161-bed acute-care hospital in Reading, voted yesterday to merge with Graduate, pending approval by Graduate's board and federal regulatory officials. Graduate's board meets later this month. June A. Roedel, chairwoman of Community General, said her board had been pursuing a merger with a larger hospital system for several years.
BUSINESS
June 13, 1990 | By Gilbert M. Gaul, Inquirer Staff Writer
Hospitals' profit margins continued to decline last year, with more than 20 medical centers in the Philadelphia area losing money on operations, according to a study released yesterday by a hospital trade group. The Delaware Valley Hospital Council said in its report that acute-care hospitals in the five-county region lost a total of $70 million on operations in fiscal 1989, which ended last June 30. The data are the most current available on the financial condition of the region's hospitals and indicate the "growing problems" confronting the multi-billion-dollar industry, the council said.
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