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Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

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ENTERTAINMENT
February 7, 2013 | By Peter Mucha, Breaking News Desk
"Shame on you Hospital and whole America!" "You can not be so arrogant as Croatia can be generous!" "How can you be so cruel????!!???????" "America has always been laughing matter in entire world with their 'pay for health' policy . . . " "Go f--- yourself!" The Facebook page for Children's Hospital of Philadelphia was overflowing this morning with nasty comments related to the case of a little Croatian girl with cancer. Nora Situm, 5, has acute lymphoblastic leukemia, according to reports, and, to try to save her life, a campaign in the economically distressed Balkan country collected contributions from thousands of people, raising $600,000 to pay for experimental treatments.
NEWS
February 5, 2003 | By Robert Moran INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Leukemia was the cause of death of a 9-year-old Philadelphia boy whose family belongs to a church that believes in healing through prayer instead of medical care, the city Medical Examiner's Office announced yesterday. Benjamin A. Reinert was found dead at home on New Year's Eve by his father, Paul Reinert, in the city's Crescentville section. The boy died naturally from acute lymphoblastic leukemia, said Jeff Moran, spokesman for the Medical Examiner's Office. That strain of the disease is often curable.
NEWS
January 11, 1990 | Marc Schogol from reports from Inquirer wire services
WOMEN AND ALCOHOL We may finally have an answer to the age-old question of why men can drink more alcohol than women. Researchers, reporting in the New England Journal of Medicine, say women's stomachs produce lower levels of an alcohol-burning chemical, and thus more alcohol enters a woman's liver and bloodstream. Women absorb about one-third more alcohol than men even when they are the same size and drink the same amount; the enzyme, called alcohol dehydrogenase, works better when the stomach is full, and alcoholics make less of it than social drinkers, the study says.
NEWS
October 25, 1998 | By Jennifer Farrell, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Mardi Gibbons had no wrenching tale of grief to inspire her. No memories of a close friend or family member who had suffered the ravages of leukemia. There was only a perfect stranger - a name, an age and an address on a piece of paper - to bring the disease to life and motivate her to help. Tomorrow, Gibbons, a grandmother and the principal at Franklin Elementary School in Pennsauken, will walk a marathon through Dublin, Ireland, in honor of 4-year-old Brianna Durasoff.
LIVING
December 29, 1997 | By Marie McCullough, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Beginning three years ago, researchers from the Wistar Institute gave an experimental therapy to 19 dogs dying of cancer. The pets were considered too sick to derive much benefit, but their reactions would show whether the therapy, called TALL-104, had toxic side effects. If it was safe, the next step would be proving it worked. To the researchers' astonishment, six of the 19 dogs temporarily went into remission - and one was completely cured. There were no serious side effects.
NEWS
April 5, 2011 | By DOM GIORDANO
SIX-YEAR-OLD Enzo Pereda is battling acute lymphoblastic leukemia. From his sickbed, he'd rest in his mother's arms and watch Ina Garten ("The Barefoot Contessa") on the Food Network. Enzo loved her show and wanted to meet her. Last year, the Make-A-Wish Foundation reached out to Garten, but the Contessa, considered a "good friend" of Make-A-Wish, told them her schedule was too busy to meet the boy. So Enzo waited. And waited. When Make-A-Wish came back this year with a reminder about his request, Garten's representatives responded with a definite no, saying the Contessa can't fill every request she receives.
NEWS
December 23, 1999 | By Jack Brown, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Two days after Michael Betz, 16, was found to have leukemia, the Bensalem School District served his mother with a lawsuit. School officials said they had been watching Michael Betz, his brother Paul, 13, and his parents for almost a year and had concluded that the family lived in Philadelphia, not Bensalem. The district demanded repayment of the money spent educating Michael and Paul Betz - $53,690.85, accountants figured. The boys' mother, Ellen Betz, insists her children live in Bensalem, in their grandmother's house, across the street from the elementary school they attended.
NEWS
December 24, 2006 | By Erica Lamberg FOR THE INQUIRER
Six-year-old Katie Harr has a flair for creativity, whether it's making artwork, baking treats with her mother, or mixing a science concoction. Four years ago, on Christmas Eve in 2002, the Montgomery Township resident was diagnosed with acute lymphoblastic leukemia, a childhood cancer, a month before her third birthday. Near the end of Katie's 26 months of daily chemotherapy, her parents asked her how she wanted to celebrate the milestone, and she replied, "I want to make a cookbook that we can sell, and I want to give the money to other kids with cancer to help them get better.
NEWS
October 2, 1988 | By Charlie Frush, Inquirer Staff Writer
Brown-eyed, sandy-haired, 4-year-old Erin Leigh Squires is a show-biz girl. She's got a laugh like Art Carney, a heart like Jackie Gleason and wants to marry Indiana Jones. But first she has to get well. Erin has acute lymphoblastic leukemia and is scheduled any day to undergo a bone-marrow transplant at Children's Hospital of Milwaukee. Without it, the doctors say she will not live another year. Even with the operation, the odds aren't great. For eight months after Erin was born on May 19, 1984, her parents, Don and Gail Squires, who now live on Chennault Drive in Mount Holly, believed they had the world by the tail.
NEWS
April 30, 2007 | By Michael Vitez INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Grandma woke Sam Johnson at 10 minutes to 8. "Sam!" she called upstairs. He rolled out of bed, stepped into his moccasins, and in seven minutes was out the door on the way to his last chemotherapy treatment. Sam, 18, was a high school freshman in December 2004 when his nose and gums started bleeding and a bruise on his arm swelled like a baseball. The diagnosis: acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Sam was one of 3,200 American children diagnosed each year. The chemotherapy regimen lasted 3? years, the standard protocol for boys - all of Sam's time in high school.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
February 7, 2013 | By Peter Mucha, Breaking News Desk
"Shame on you Hospital and whole America!" "You can not be so arrogant as Croatia can be generous!" "How can you be so cruel????!!???????" "America has always been laughing matter in entire world with their 'pay for health' policy . . . " "Go f--- yourself!" The Facebook page for Children's Hospital of Philadelphia was overflowing this morning with nasty comments related to the case of a little Croatian girl with cancer. Nora Situm, 5, has acute lymphoblastic leukemia, according to reports, and, to try to save her life, a campaign in the economically distressed Balkan country collected contributions from thousands of people, raising $600,000 to pay for experimental treatments.
NEWS
April 5, 2011 | By DOM GIORDANO
SIX-YEAR-OLD Enzo Pereda is battling acute lymphoblastic leukemia. From his sickbed, he'd rest in his mother's arms and watch Ina Garten ("The Barefoot Contessa") on the Food Network. Enzo loved her show and wanted to meet her. Last year, the Make-A-Wish Foundation reached out to Garten, but the Contessa, considered a "good friend" of Make-A-Wish, told them her schedule was too busy to meet the boy. So Enzo waited. And waited. When Make-A-Wish came back this year with a reminder about his request, Garten's representatives responded with a definite no, saying the Contessa can't fill every request she receives.
NEWS
April 30, 2007 | By Michael Vitez INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Grandma woke Sam Johnson at 10 minutes to 8. "Sam!" she called upstairs. He rolled out of bed, stepped into his moccasins, and in seven minutes was out the door on the way to his last chemotherapy treatment. Sam, 18, was a high school freshman in December 2004 when his nose and gums started bleeding and a bruise on his arm swelled like a baseball. The diagnosis: acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Sam was one of 3,200 American children diagnosed each year. The chemotherapy regimen lasted 3? years, the standard protocol for boys - all of Sam's time in high school.
NEWS
December 24, 2006 | By Erica Lamberg FOR THE INQUIRER
Six-year-old Katie Harr has a flair for creativity, whether it's making artwork, baking treats with her mother, or mixing a science concoction. Four years ago, on Christmas Eve in 2002, the Montgomery Township resident was diagnosed with acute lymphoblastic leukemia, a childhood cancer, a month before her third birthday. Near the end of Katie's 26 months of daily chemotherapy, her parents asked her how she wanted to celebrate the milestone, and she replied, "I want to make a cookbook that we can sell, and I want to give the money to other kids with cancer to help them get better.
NEWS
February 5, 2003 | By Robert Moran INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Leukemia was the cause of death of a 9-year-old Philadelphia boy whose family belongs to a church that believes in healing through prayer instead of medical care, the city Medical Examiner's Office announced yesterday. Benjamin A. Reinert was found dead at home on New Year's Eve by his father, Paul Reinert, in the city's Crescentville section. The boy died naturally from acute lymphoblastic leukemia, said Jeff Moran, spokesman for the Medical Examiner's Office. That strain of the disease is often curable.
NEWS
December 23, 1999 | By Jack Brown, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Two days after Michael Betz, 16, was found to have leukemia, the Bensalem School District served his mother with a lawsuit. School officials said they had been watching Michael Betz, his brother Paul, 13, and his parents for almost a year and had concluded that the family lived in Philadelphia, not Bensalem. The district demanded repayment of the money spent educating Michael and Paul Betz - $53,690.85, accountants figured. The boys' mother, Ellen Betz, insists her children live in Bensalem, in their grandmother's house, across the street from the elementary school they attended.
NEWS
October 25, 1998 | By Jennifer Farrell, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Mardi Gibbons had no wrenching tale of grief to inspire her. No memories of a close friend or family member who had suffered the ravages of leukemia. There was only a perfect stranger - a name, an age and an address on a piece of paper - to bring the disease to life and motivate her to help. Tomorrow, Gibbons, a grandmother and the principal at Franklin Elementary School in Pennsauken, will walk a marathon through Dublin, Ireland, in honor of 4-year-old Brianna Durasoff.
LIVING
December 29, 1997 | By Marie McCullough, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Beginning three years ago, researchers from the Wistar Institute gave an experimental therapy to 19 dogs dying of cancer. The pets were considered too sick to derive much benefit, but their reactions would show whether the therapy, called TALL-104, had toxic side effects. If it was safe, the next step would be proving it worked. To the researchers' astonishment, six of the 19 dogs temporarily went into remission - and one was completely cured. There were no serious side effects.
NEWS
May 8, 1994 | By Arlene Martin, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Jeff Barthmaier thinks he's strong but admits he has little endurance. Still, he will join hundreds of others on Saturday in the Relay for Life at Haddonfield High School. The fund-raiser is sponsored by the Camden County unit of the American Cancer Society. Barthmaier, 19, of Erial, has acute lymphoblastic leukemia, known as ALL. He has endured chemotherapy, radiation, lumbar punctures and regular bone- marrow tests to treat the cancer, which was diagnosed in April 1993. "At first I dismissed all the signs," he said.
SPORTS
October 9, 1990 | By Ray Didinger, Daily News Sports Writer
Kevin Singleton used to feel invincible. He was a 6-2, 230-pound linebacker for the University of Arizona's nationally ranked football team. He could bench press 440 pounds. He could run the 40-yard dash in 4.5 seconds. He combined with twin brother Chris, also a linebacker, to make more than 250 tackles for the Wildcats in the 1988 season. The Singletwins, that's what Arizona fans called them. Chris made first- team All-Pac 10 two years ago. Kevin made honorable mention. They both appeared headed to wealth and fame in the NFL. Then in July 1989, Kevin Singleton was hospitalized with what was thought to be a bacterial infection.
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