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Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

NEWS
July 3, 1997 | By Mark Jaffe, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The largest and most detailed study conducted on the threat posed by high-tension power lines has found no link between the electromagnetic fields created by the lines and the most common form of childhood leukemia. "There simply wasn't any clear, consistent effect," said Martha Linet, the National Cancer Institute epidemiologist who headed the research group. The findings - based on an evaluation of 1,248 healthy and sick children under age 15 - were reported in today's New England Journal of Medicine.
SPORTS
October 8, 1993 | By Diane Pucin, INQUIRER COLUMNIST
This playoff series is about more than baseball for Steve Bedrosian. It is about his 6-year-old son, Cody, who has acute lymphoblastic leukemia. It is about his 8-year-old son, Kyle, who wants to save his brother's life. And maybe can't. It is about his 2-year-old son, Cameron, who doesn't exactly understand what's happening. And who might save Cody. And it is about a telephone call to a hotel room from his wife, Tammy, who is back in Atlanta. The call comes from the hospital where Cody had a good day, a good checkup, with not many leukemic cells left in his blood right now. There's not much hair on his head, either, because chemotherapy does that, but a 6-year-old doesn't worry about it so much.
NEWS
May 4, 2008 | By Lauren Meade FOR THE INQUIRER
Six-year-old Brynn Henry has spent half her life battling leukemia. But on a chilly April Saturday in Glenmoore, Brynn wasn't thinking about her cancer. All she could think about was trying to get the Chincoteague pony she was riding to catch up with her little sister, who was running circles around a barn. Brynn spread her arms out like an airplane as the pony advanced toward the giggling target. With so much of her life out of her control, Brynn, of Coatesville, has found a much-needed escape through horseback riding.
NEWS
August 20, 1987 | From Inquirer Wire Services
The medical director of the National Multiple Sclerosis Society has criticized a recent study that indicated a new drug might help MS patients and said he feared a black market could develop for the drug. The drug is a synthetic protein called Copolymer-1 that was developed in Israel. A doctor reported last week in the New England Journal of Medicine that, in a preliminary trial in the United States, the drug appeared effective in alleviating multiple sclerosis' symptoms. Multiple sclerosis is a crippling disease characterized by a slow degeneration of the protective sheath that surrounds nerves, resulting in a gradual loss of muscle control.
NEWS
April 15, 2013
Small plates make small eaters Everyone who has ever read a diet book knows this tip: Use a smaller plate, and you are likely to put less food on it. Now researchers have found the same is true for children taking food at school lunch. A study showed the "food environment" - conditions around eating - counts, the researchers from universities in Pennsylvania, Ohio and Virginia said. The researchers repeatedly watched 42 first graders serve themselves lunch at school, using plates and bowls of adult size and half as large.
NEWS
February 24, 2012 | BY JASON NARK, narkj@phillynews.com 215-854-5916
PSST, Taylor Swift, I know a boy who likes you. He loves your music and thinks you're really sweet. He thinks you're really cute, too. No wait, he actually said "beautiful. " His name's Kevin McGuire, and yesterday he poured his big, romantic heart out to me from his room on the third floor of Children's Hospital of Philadelphia. That's the oncology unit. He's dealing with a relapse of acute lymphoblastic leukemia. He's very tired and a little homesick. But when I asked what he'd say to you if he saw you in person, he perked up a little and said he already had something prepared.
NEWS
December 11, 2012 | By Marie McCullough, Inquirer Staff Writer
A 7-year-old pixie named Emily Whitehead has erased any remaining doubts about the power of a University of Pennsylvania gene therapy to eradicate certain blood cancers. The therapy is personalized using each patient's immune system "T cells. " Three weeks after Emily's infusion in April, she was completely free of the leukemia that had been on the verge of killing her. Just as important, she showed that the T cell therapy can have catastrophic side effects, and pointed the way for her doctors to find an antidote.
NEWS
November 12, 1989 | By Gloria A. Hoffner, Special to The Inquirer
When he's not playing tag with his brothers, Brian Swiekczek's favorite activity is playing a new video game called Police Artist. The 9-year-old from Upper Providence Township enjoys mixing and matching clues with the computer memory game. In fact, his mother, June Swiekczek, said sometimes the only thing that can pull him away from the game is a flashing light indicating that he has an incoming message on his computer modem. The message is from his friends at Rose Tree Elementary School who have been corresponding with Brian through a new computer service called Prodigy during his recovery from a bone marrow transplant performed in Seattle.
NEWS
December 28, 1989 | By Gloria A. Hoffner, Special to The Inquirer
The signs in the fourth grade class at Rose Tree Elementary School read: "Welcome Back, Brian. " And when 9-year-old Brian Swierczek finally made his appearance Friday, the 21 students waved banners and applauded wildly. "He looks good," said his friend Brian Boschetti, also 9. "This is the best Christmas present anyone could have," said his teacher, Audrey Foster. Brian, who lives in Upper Providence Township, was back after a bone-marrow transplant at the Fred Hutchinson Cancer Center/Swedish Hospital Medical Center in Seattle to combat acute non-lymphoblastic leukemia.
NEWS
April 19, 2006 | By Tirdad Derakhshani INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Leave it to Tom Cruise to try to one-up Brooke Shields. No sooner do we learn that Shields has brought a new life into the world than Cruise puts forth the same glad tidings. Shields, 40, gave birth yesterday to a daughter named Grier Hammond Henchy. According to People mag, the baby, born in L.A., weighed in at seven pounds and measured 20 inches. Shields and hub Chris Henchy, 42, have another daughter, Rowan, who will be 3 next month. Cruise, 43, and his inamorata, Katie Holmes, 27, also gave birth to a girl yesterday in L.A., according to Cruise spokesman Arnold Robinson.
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