CollectionsAd Council
IN THE NEWS

Ad Council

FEATURED ARTICLES
BUSINESS
December 11, 1992 | By Susan Warner, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The Advertising Council of New York yesterday said it had asked Tyco Toys Inc., a Mount Laurel toymaker, to pull its Incredible Crash Dummies off the market because they tarnish the image of characters used in the council's public-service announcements. Tyco refused, saying the plastic dummies, whose arms, legs and heads fly off when their cars crash, promote traffic safety. "We're proud of the fact that 'The Incredible Crash Dummies' toy line is the first ever to incorporate a life-saving safety message to children," Tyco chairman Richard Grey said in a statement.
BUSINESS
May 26, 1992 | by Rose DeWolf, Daily News Staff Writer
Earle Palmer Brown, chairman of the Philadelphia advertising agency that bears his name, has a problem with a public service radio ad distributed by the Advertising Council. This ad features a father and son talking about the need to be careful with matches when camping in the woods in order to prevent forest fires. But that's not what bothers Brown. It's the discussion between the two over the proper name for the bear who, thanks to Ad Council efforts since the mid-1940s, has become the symbol of forest fire prevention in America.
NEWS
March 23, 2006
Nothing creates a sense of urgency quite like a ticking clock or speeding train. In startling ads debuting today, the Ad Council, the group that created some of the most memorable public-service ads in history, agitates for action - now - to slow global warming. Going straight to the public, the highly respected nonprofit bypasses the ideological stalemate in Washington and brings the long controversial issue into the mainstream. A successful campaign could inspire long-needed aggressive action on this growing global threat.
NEWS
March 23, 2006 | By Sandy Bauers INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Your favorite TV show has ended. You've just seen the ads for Lipitor and light beer, and here comes another: Tick. Tick. Massive heat waves. One after another, the faces of small children appear. Tick. Tick. Severe droughts. The kids look and sound serious, maybe even upset. Tick. Go to www.globalwarming.com. While there's still time. Yikes! Did some ad exec get lost on a disaster movie set? Not quite. Fred Krupp, president of Environmental Defense, has teamed with the Ad Council, which has challenged social norms with such public-service campaigns as "Friends don't let friends drive drunk" and Nancy Reagan's "Just say no. " In a series of TV and radio spots that one publicist termed "edgy" - and that a global-warming skeptic called "the ultimate triumph of propaganda over science" - the group is hoping to spawn a massive shift in social awareness that will send millions rushing to turn down their thermostats, inflate their car tires, and recycle their plastic.
BUSINESS
May 28, 1992 | by Rose DeWolf, Daily News Staff Writer
This just in on Smokey (the?) Bear. It was reported in Tuesday's Daily News that, according to a current radio ad produced by the Advertising Council, Smokey, the well-known symbol of forest fire prevention, should be known as Smokey Bear, not Smokey the Bear. Well, according to Daily News reader Walter Vertreace of Philadelphia, that may be what the Ad Council is saying now, but it's not what it was saying some years ago when he was a Boy Scout. Vertreace can still remember and sing the following lyrics which he learned in his scouting days: "Smokey the Bear, Smokey the Bear "Prowling and Growling and Sniffing the Air "He can find a fire before it starts to flame "That's why they call him Smokey.
NEWS
May 2, 2007
The moral of the story is: It's a confusing world, kids. The release of Shrek the Third on May 18 will bring the usual onslaught of promotional products, including candy, soda and sugary cereal. Grocery aisles will ring with "I wants" from the grade-school crowd. At the same time, television is featuring Shrek public-service ads beseeching increasingly overweight youngsters to "get up and play an hour a day. " Talk about a mixed message. Are kids supposed to exercise before or after downing a Shrek Pop Tart?
NEWS
October 10, 2013
Win for children The city's new facility dedicated to providing the best possible services for children who are suspected to have been sexually abused is a bright, clean, child- and adult-friendly facility. There, family advocates, forensic interviewers, and therapists of the Philadelphia Children's Alliance, investigating social workers from the Department of Human Services, and Special Victims Unit police officers can work together to ensure that children and families are treated responsively and sensitively, with the goal of promoting high-quality investigations and ensuring child safety.
NEWS
June 4, 1992 | By Alexis Moore, INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
Spurred by a sharp increase in hate crimes and the nationwide riots after the verdict in the Rodney King beating case, two groups yesterday announced a multimillion-dollar education campaign to help eliminate discrimination and celebrate America's diverse population. At a news conference here, the Ad Council and the Leadership Conference Education Fund presented the first of a series of 20-second and 30-second television spots that are part of the campaign. ABC-TV was scheduled to air the ads beginning last night, and the other networks and cable stations were expected to follow soon.
NEWS
December 8, 2003 | By Marie McCullough INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A government-funded advertising campaign to encourage breast-feeding is being toned down and postponed amid criticism that the ads make unproven medical claims and use scare tactics. The leading critics are the makers of infant formula, a multibillion-dollar industry. Complaints also have come from officials at the American Academy of Pediatrics, a group that staunchly promotes breast-feeding and drew fire in 1997 for urging new mothers to commit to the practice for at least a year.
NEWS
September 6, 2012
By Lise Funderburg AARP and the Ad Council recently released a new series of public service announcements about caregiving. My favorite is a television spot featuring a man and his elderly mother sitting in a doctor's office. As a calm voice speaks over a soundtrack of tinkling piano keys, the man opens his mouth and screams. We can't hear it, but his expression speaks volumes. That silent scream stopped me in my tracks, taking me back to the spring day in 2004 when my two sisters and I crowded into an oncologist's office with our father to hear his test results: stage IV metastasized prostate cancer, already perforating the bones of his skeleton on its way to his brain.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
October 10, 2013
Win for children The city's new facility dedicated to providing the best possible services for children who are suspected to have been sexually abused is a bright, clean, child- and adult-friendly facility. There, family advocates, forensic interviewers, and therapists of the Philadelphia Children's Alliance, investigating social workers from the Department of Human Services, and Special Victims Unit police officers can work together to ensure that children and families are treated responsively and sensitively, with the goal of promoting high-quality investigations and ensuring child safety.
NEWS
September 6, 2012
By Lise Funderburg AARP and the Ad Council recently released a new series of public service announcements about caregiving. My favorite is a television spot featuring a man and his elderly mother sitting in a doctor's office. As a calm voice speaks over a soundtrack of tinkling piano keys, the man opens his mouth and screams. We can't hear it, but his expression speaks volumes. That silent scream stopped me in my tracks, taking me back to the spring day in 2004 when my two sisters and I crowded into an oncologist's office with our father to hear his test results: stage IV metastasized prostate cancer, already perforating the bones of his skeleton on its way to his brain.
NEWS
August 31, 2009 | By Edward Colimore INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Army Spec. Bryan Adams saw the signs of trouble. People were shuffling away as he and other members of his unit walked down a street in the Iraqi city of Tikrit in October 2004. Off to the side, two children sitting on a curb appeared frightened, as though they knew what was about to happen. "I looked at their huge eyes, literally took five steps, then heard the gunfire," said Adams, 25, of Palmyra. "I was hit in the left leg, stumbled a little, and started running. " Bullets peppered a wall next to him. One hit his hand before he got around a corner "out of the kill zone.
NEWS
May 2, 2007
The moral of the story is: It's a confusing world, kids. The release of Shrek the Third on May 18 will bring the usual onslaught of promotional products, including candy, soda and sugary cereal. Grocery aisles will ring with "I wants" from the grade-school crowd. At the same time, television is featuring Shrek public-service ads beseeching increasingly overweight youngsters to "get up and play an hour a day. " Talk about a mixed message. Are kids supposed to exercise before or after downing a Shrek Pop Tart?
NEWS
March 23, 2006
Nothing creates a sense of urgency quite like a ticking clock or speeding train. In startling ads debuting today, the Ad Council, the group that created some of the most memorable public-service ads in history, agitates for action - now - to slow global warming. Going straight to the public, the highly respected nonprofit bypasses the ideological stalemate in Washington and brings the long controversial issue into the mainstream. A successful campaign could inspire long-needed aggressive action on this growing global threat.
NEWS
March 23, 2006 | By Sandy Bauers INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Your favorite TV show has ended. You've just seen the ads for Lipitor and light beer, and here comes another: Tick. Tick. Massive heat waves. One after another, the faces of small children appear. Tick. Tick. Severe droughts. The kids look and sound serious, maybe even upset. Tick. Go to www.globalwarming.com. While there's still time. Yikes! Did some ad exec get lost on a disaster movie set? Not quite. Fred Krupp, president of Environmental Defense, has teamed with the Ad Council, which has challenged social norms with such public-service campaigns as "Friends don't let friends drive drunk" and Nancy Reagan's "Just say no. " In a series of TV and radio spots that one publicist termed "edgy" - and that a global-warming skeptic called "the ultimate triumph of propaganda over science" - the group is hoping to spawn a massive shift in social awareness that will send millions rushing to turn down their thermostats, inflate their car tires, and recycle their plastic.
NEWS
December 8, 2003 | By Marie McCullough INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A government-funded advertising campaign to encourage breast-feeding is being toned down and postponed amid criticism that the ads make unproven medical claims and use scare tactics. The leading critics are the makers of infant formula, a multibillion-dollar industry. Complaints also have come from officials at the American Academy of Pediatrics, a group that staunchly promotes breast-feeding and drew fire in 1997 for urging new mothers to commit to the practice for at least a year.
NEWS
March 20, 1999 | by Dave Davies, Daily News Staff Writer
It was like old times in City Council chambers yesterday. Former President John Street was back, standing on the Council floor in a well-tailored suit, conferring with associates and cutting a statesman-like figure. The difference is that the people on Council floor were actors, and everybody was surrounded by the Klieg lights, cameras, microphones booms and crews wearing headsets and carrying clipboards. And nobody, especially reporters, was allowed inside. Street was taping scenes for TV commercials he plans to air in the mayor's race at City Hall, using Council chambers, the ornate Council caucus room across the hall, and the mayor's Cabinet room on the second floor for scenes.
NEWS
May 2, 1996 | By Alison Fitzgerald, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
After two meetings and two postponements, the Planning Board last night at long last gave its approval to a developer who wants to build a Wal-Mart on Route 41. The 6-3 approval comes on the heels of last week's action by the Township Council, which voted to change the zoning of the building site to prevent the developer, The Wolfson Group Inc., from building the store on a 30-acre plot on the state highway. However, since that zoning change does not take effect until May 14, last night's Planning Board action gives Wolfson the go-ahead to build the shopping center.
NEWS
March 13, 1994 | By Josh Zimmer, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Edward F. Doczy looks a little too relaxed to be the city administrator of an economically depressed community struggling to regain some of its old vigor. But there's a reason for the mood. The challenges that brought him here 18 months ago from a suburb of St. Louis are no longer his to confront. On Tuesday, Doczy will become the city manager for Springboro, Ohio, an expanding, prosperous community between Cincinnati and Dayton. For Doczy, who often found the process of initiating long-term planning in this blue-collar city frustrating, the chance to pursue those goals in a city with greater resources while living closer to relatives was too good to decline.
1 | 2 | Next »
|
|
|
|
|