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Adam Yauch

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ENTERTAINMENT
May 6, 2012 | By Dan DeLuca, Inquirer Music Critic
Adam Yauch, 47, a founding member of the Beastie Boys, the pioneering New York hip-hop group whose 1980s breakthrough as impudent, white rap superstars was followed by a long career that combined popular success with musical innovation, died Friday in New York. Mr. Yauch, who rapped under the name MCA and directed movies and many of the band's videos under the name Nathanial Hornblower, was found to have cancer of the salivary gland in 2009. The band's album Hot Sauce Committee, Part One was scheduled to be released that year but was delayed because of Mr. Yauch's illness and was released in 2011 as Hot Sauce Committee, Part Two. In April the Beastie Boys — whose landmark albums include the 9 million-selling License To Ill (1986)
ENTERTAINMENT
March 31, 2006 | By Steven Rea INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
In Awesome; I ... Shot That!, the Beastie Boys hand out high-8 videocams to audience members at Madison Square Garden and then take the stage while Mix Master Mike turns the tables, letting the rap and roar begin. A guerrilla-style concert pic, featuring the Adidas-clad rappers Mike D (Michael Diamond), Ad-Rock (Adam Horovitz), and MCA (Adam Yauch), this jumpy, slap-happy and loud historical document (the performance is from Oct. 9, 2004) should satisfy Beastie Boy fans and the 50 untrained shooters whose footage is deployed.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 27, 2008
Directed by Adam Yauch. With Michael Beasley, Tyreke Evans, Bobbito Garcia and Jerryd Bayless. Distributed by Oscilloscope Laboratories. 1 hour, 30 mins. PG-13 (profanity). Playing at: Ritz at the Bourse. A basketball movie directed by a Beastie Boy, Gunnin' for That #1 Spot follows eight high school phenoms selected for the Elite 24 all-star game held at Rucker Park, the Harlem hoops mecca, in September 2006. For roundball junkies and hip-hop heads, it's an enticing combination.
NEWS
October 13, 2004 | By Patrick Berkery FOR THE INQUIRER
The older, wiser Beastie Boys who rocked a two-thirds-full Wachovia Center on Monday might not be the same MCs who played with a caged woman and an inflatable phallus at the Spectrum 17 years ago. But that doesn't mean they're above giving their audience a good, old-fashioned punking. The Beasties had just traded rhymes about doing the "Wop" and the "Flintstone Flop" in "Intergalactic" while standing among the crowd on the arena's first level. At song's end they quickly disappeared, the lights went up, and satisfied fans exited as the roadies began disassembling the stage.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 13, 1995 | By Dan DeLuca, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The Beastie Boys definitely got it goin' on. Nine years after first taking their Pumas, beanies and wise-guy antics to the 'burbs, the Three Stooges of hip-hop are more popular (and wiser) than ever. On Wednesday, the 'burbs came to them, as 10,000 fans descended on the Philadelphia Civic Center for a 3 1/2-hour funk-o-rama that also included the organic hip-hop of the Roots and indie-roots shaman Jon Spencer. There was the disco ball overhead as the Beasties laid down slinky funk grooves.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 22, 1998 | By Jonathan Valania, FOR THE INQUIRER
That fading bohemian Buddha Perry Farrell may have ushered youth culture into the '90s, but it's the Beastie Boys, those break-beat bodhisattvas, who will take it out. With an uber-hip record label (Grand Royal), one of the few remaining must-read zines (Grand Royal, again), an international cause celebre (Free Tibet), a skateboard-chic clothing line (Extra Large), and an excellent new album (Hello Nasty, currently No. 3 in the country), the Beasties are having a large impact on late-'90s alternative culture.
NEWS
April 8, 1987 | By Ken Tucker, Inquirer Popular-Music Critic
The most controversial - and most popular - act in current popular music, the Beastie Boys, performed last night at the Spectrum. For the last three weeks, this trio's debut album, Licensed to Ill (Def Jam/Columbia), has been the No. 1 record in the country, and the album's raucous, mock-furious single, "You Gotta Fight for Your Right (to Party)," an unofficial national anthem among the predominantly teenage audience it amuses. The Beastie Boys' claim to stylistic originality lies in the fact that they have managed to combine the terse staccato prosody of rap music with the harsh jangle of punk rock.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 23, 2011
Ahmir "?uestlove" Thompson has a night job. No, not the one where he sits behind the drum kit with The Roots on Late Night With Jimmy Fallon. That's finished taping before dinner. On nights and weekends, in New York, Philadelphia, and around the world, the funky drummer assumes another identity: DJ ?uestlove. It's in this guise that he'll be performing at the Popped! Music Festival in the Liacouras Center at Temple University on the second, more dance-music-oriented night of the fest.
NEWS
June 1, 1987 | By Mark Butler, Inquirer Staff Writer (The Associated Press and United Press International contributed to this report.)
A member of the New York band the Beastie Boys was arrested in Britain yesterday in connection with a melee that erupted in a Liverpool theater Saturday night when the band left the stage after being taunted by the audience. Four fans sustained minor injuries and five were arrested after the incident at the Royal Court Theater. The manager of the theater called in police when bottles and other objects were thrown in the auditorium, packed with 3,000 fans. A police spokesman denied news reports that tear gas had been thrown into the crowd.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 1, 1987 | By Ken Tucker, Inquirer Popular-Music Critic
For a while there, it looked like the Beastie Boys were only going to be a rock-critic cult favorite. They seemed too good to be true - or to become stars: Here were three young fellows making some of the most aggressive, rough-rhythmed rap songs around. And most intriguing of all, they were white, but they weren't rapping to be campy or exploitive: An early Beastie Boy record like "Cookie Puss" was as convincing as any rap music being made by a black artist, even as the song acknowledged the irony of attempting this most difficult racial crossover.
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NEWS
May 14, 2012 | By Dan DeLuca, INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
On "Disparate Youth," the single from Santigold's new album, Master Of My Make-Believe, that she sang Tuesday at the Trocadero while flanked by a pair of dancers and wearing a floral-print romper, the avant-pop singer led the crowd in the mantra-like chorus: "We know now that we want more?/?Oh-ah, Oh-ah?/?A life worth fighting for. " And what, for Santi White — the Mount Airy-raised, Brooklyn-based, genre-mashing songwriter who began her U.S. tour for her keenly anticipated sophomore album with a sold-out show at the Chinatown club — what, exactly, constitutes "a life worth fighting for"?
ENTERTAINMENT
May 6, 2012 | By Dan DeLuca, Inquirer Music Critic
Adam Yauch, 47, a founding member of the Beastie Boys, the pioneering New York hip-hop group whose 1980s breakthrough as impudent, white rap superstars was followed by a long career that combined popular success with musical innovation, died Friday in New York. Mr. Yauch, who rapped under the name MCA and directed movies and many of the band's videos under the name Nathanial Hornblower, was found to have cancer of the salivary gland in 2009. The band's album Hot Sauce Committee, Part One was scheduled to be released that year but was delayed because of Mr. Yauch's illness and was released in 2011 as Hot Sauce Committee, Part Two. In April the Beastie Boys — whose landmark albums include the 9 million-selling License To Ill (1986)
ENTERTAINMENT
September 23, 2011
Ahmir "?uestlove" Thompson has a night job. No, not the one where he sits behind the drum kit with The Roots on Late Night With Jimmy Fallon. That's finished taping before dinner. On nights and weekends, in New York, Philadelphia, and around the world, the funky drummer assumes another identity: DJ ?uestlove. It's in this guise that he'll be performing at the Popped! Music Festival in the Liacouras Center at Temple University on the second, more dance-music-oriented night of the fest.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 27, 2008
Directed by Adam Yauch. With Michael Beasley, Tyreke Evans, Bobbito Garcia and Jerryd Bayless. Distributed by Oscilloscope Laboratories. 1 hour, 30 mins. PG-13 (profanity). Playing at: Ritz at the Bourse. A basketball movie directed by a Beastie Boy, Gunnin' for That #1 Spot follows eight high school phenoms selected for the Elite 24 all-star game held at Rucker Park, the Harlem hoops mecca, in September 2006. For roundball junkies and hip-hop heads, it's an enticing combination.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 31, 2006 | By Steven Rea INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
In Awesome; I ... Shot That!, the Beastie Boys hand out high-8 videocams to audience members at Madison Square Garden and then take the stage while Mix Master Mike turns the tables, letting the rap and roar begin. A guerrilla-style concert pic, featuring the Adidas-clad rappers Mike D (Michael Diamond), Ad-Rock (Adam Horovitz), and MCA (Adam Yauch), this jumpy, slap-happy and loud historical document (the performance is from Oct. 9, 2004) should satisfy Beastie Boy fans and the 50 untrained shooters whose footage is deployed.
NEWS
October 13, 2004 | By Patrick Berkery FOR THE INQUIRER
The older, wiser Beastie Boys who rocked a two-thirds-full Wachovia Center on Monday might not be the same MCs who played with a caged woman and an inflatable phallus at the Spectrum 17 years ago. But that doesn't mean they're above giving their audience a good, old-fashioned punking. The Beasties had just traded rhymes about doing the "Wop" and the "Flintstone Flop" in "Intergalactic" while standing among the crowd on the arena's first level. At song's end they quickly disappeared, the lights went up, and satisfied fans exited as the roadies began disassembling the stage.
NEWS
June 15, 2004 | By Tom Moon INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
On the last track of the Beastie Boys' To the 5 Boroughs, after the three brash white rappers have dispensed the inevitable "we're so crazy" rhymes, shouted out to the city that "blends and mends and tests," and revived '70s ad slogans, there comes a moment of undisguised idealism. The song is a little empowerment chant called "We Got the. " MCA, the rapper Adam Yauch, begins: "If you want it, be the change. " Then Mike D takes the spotlight: "Gotta spread love or the world goes . . . " the last word of his sentence supplied, right on the beat, by the sound a cuckoo clock.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 20, 1998 | By Tom Moon, INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
In this, the Year of Self-Examination, the buzzwords in rock and hip-hop and pop's other, ever-shifting subgenres were personal transformation. Just about everyone who mattered joined the quest. "How you gonna win if you ain't right within?" Lauryn Hill demanded, her million-dollar question thrown down like a gauntlet. Some stars shared the methods they use to align themselves with a higher power: Dave Matthews challenged the self-anointed "chosen ones," Madonna did her phonetic Hindi shtick.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 22, 1998 | By Jonathan Valania, FOR THE INQUIRER
That fading bohemian Buddha Perry Farrell may have ushered youth culture into the '90s, but it's the Beastie Boys, those break-beat bodhisattvas, who will take it out. With an uber-hip record label (Grand Royal), one of the few remaining must-read zines (Grand Royal, again), an international cause celebre (Free Tibet), a skateboard-chic clothing line (Extra Large), and an excellent new album (Hello Nasty, currently No. 3 in the country), the Beasties are having a large impact on late-'90s alternative culture.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 13, 1995 | By Dan DeLuca, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The Beastie Boys definitely got it goin' on. Nine years after first taking their Pumas, beanies and wise-guy antics to the 'burbs, the Three Stooges of hip-hop are more popular (and wiser) than ever. On Wednesday, the 'burbs came to them, as 10,000 fans descended on the Philadelphia Civic Center for a 3 1/2-hour funk-o-rama that also included the organic hip-hop of the Roots and indie-roots shaman Jon Spencer. There was the disco ball overhead as the Beasties laid down slinky funk grooves.
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