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NEWS
September 30, 2004
I commend Gov. Rendell's declaration making Sept. 27 "Family Day," and his encouragement that parents talk to their children about drug and alcohol abuse. I'd like to offer a suggestion. Given the direction he is taking Pennsylvania, he might want to encourage parents to speak to their children about gambling addiction, too. As the fastest growing addiction among teens, and one not as easily detected as substance abuse (no slurred speech or dilated pupils), parent will need to speak clearly and firmly about the dangers posed from slot machines and other gambling.
NEWS
May 26, 2006
RE THE MAY 18 letter from Karen (Majewski) Waldsmit: I am a certified addiction counselor and about to complete a graduate-studies program. I have worked on inpatient psychiatric, detox and residential units and am currently working in an outpatient methadone program. I take issue with the statement in the letter that "there is an addictive gene"! Several studies since Blum and Noble's identification of the "common thread" have failed to replicate their findings. This misconception of an identified gene to explain this behavior fosters a perspective that exaggerates the significance of genetic research in addiction and ignores caveats and qualifications.
NEWS
April 30, 1997 | By Gerald K. McOscar
I had my first cigarette when I was about 10. My mother smoked Kents and my father smoked Camels, so it had to have been one of those. My parents knew, of course. They didn't approve, but they knew. But smoking was no big deal in the '50s. Besides, they had other things on their minds, such as feeding four hungry boys, making sure our homework was done and dragging us kicking and screaming out of bed and off to school each morning (always with a breakfast of hot oatmeal whether we wanted the stuff or not)
ENTERTAINMENT
June 20, 2003 | By Amy Phillips FOR THE INQUIRER
On the surface, Lisa Germano's Lullaby for Liquid Pig (Ineffable/Artist Direct), appears to be a concept album about alcoholism. Lyrics about wine, buzzes and "liquid pigs" float in and out of a woozy melodic haze, and songs such as "Dream Glasses Off" and "From a Shell" feel like the sonic equivalent of a lonely, drunken saunter home in the early-morning fog. But the 45-year-old Germano, who gained fame as a violinist in John Mellencamp's band in...
NEWS
April 19, 1990 | BY MATTHEW WEISS
I am an addict. Though I have heard or read thousands of confessions, sordid histories and tales of redemption over the years, I never expected to hear myself say those four words: I am an addict. One thing I can say for my addiction - it's not a lonely one. It is among the most pervasive, insidious, destructive habits in the world, and chances are that if you're reading this article, you are close to someone with this problem. I became a user at 16. This is when most Americans pick up the habit, although it can strike a person at anytime in his or her adult life.
NEWS
October 29, 2006 | By Valerie Reed INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
In Rick Pine's third-story office are inspirational messages painted by his mother on slate fragments. The familiar Serenity Prayer, which asks God for "courage to change the things I can," is propped near his desk in the Bensalem manor that for 40 years has served as headquarters of the Livengrin Foundation, a substance-abuse treatment center. For Pine, president and chief executive officer of the nonprofit center, inspiration comes from reaching out each day to those whose lives are controlled by alcohol or drugs.
NEWS
July 1, 1990 | By Melissa Dribben, Inquirer Staff Writer
Don Newcombe, former star pitcher for the Brooklyn Dodgers, hasn't pitched a game in 28 years. The only reason he picks up baseballs anymore is to sign them. The 8-by-10 glossy black-and-white photograph of him, looking as if he had just thrown a strike, was taken in 1958. He carries copies in his briefcase to autograph for his fans. Newcombe was in Norristown last week, signing baseballs, autographing photos and talking about alcoholism, which he said forced him to give up the career that earned him Rookie of the Year honors in 1949 and the Most Valuable Player and Cy Young Awards in 1956.
NEWS
October 22, 1997
If addicts weren't weak or bad, they wouldn't use drugs, right? And some drugs are addictive psychologically, but not physically, right? Both wrong. But these are true: Addiction is a brain disease. Almost all drugs that get abused - heroin, cocaine, amphetamines, nicotine, PCP, LSD - have much the same effect on the same pathway in the brain. Scientists see this as the common factor in why addicts keep seeking and using drugs regardless of the consequences - including prison or death.
NEWS
August 10, 1988 | By Desmond Ryan, Inquirer Movie Critic
One of the most predictable wrongs of spring - apart from the unfounded aura of optimism emanating from the Phillies camp - is the way great comic acting is slighted in the Oscar voting. True, Robin Williams was nominated this year for Good Morning, Vietnam, but he had no real shot at winning an Academy Award. More typically, Steve Martin's brilliant work in Roxanne was overlooked entirely. It's no wonder then that our leading comic actors feel compelled to take serious roles in order to be taken seriously by their peers.
NEWS
March 26, 2007 | By JUDY SHEPPS BATTLE
WHEN MY sons were young, they would take baseball cards to school to "flip" - heads you win, tails you lose, winner take all. Some days they came home in tears because they'd lost their favorite cards. Their father and I would wipe their noses and lecture them on the perils of betting. When they got to middle school, the tears stopped, but I did notice that many days they returned home extremely hungry. I heard stories about poker games in the boys' restroom but didn't give it much thought.
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NEWS
July 25, 2014 | BY JULIE SHAW, Daily News Staff Writer shawj@phillynews.com, 215-854-2592
A SOUTH PHILLY drug addict who conspired with a Philly police officer to steal drugs from dealers was sentenced yesterday in federal court to 10 months behind bars. Robert Nagy, 26, was awarded for cooperating with the government, and as part of his sentence was ordered to continue cooperating with the feds. The identity of the cop with whom he conspired was not revealed in court and has not been revealed in public court documents. He has been identified only by the initials C.S. Nagy pleaded guilty in April to conspiracy to commit extortion.
NEWS
July 16, 2014 | By Kevin Riordan, Inquirer Columnist
The day Seabrook House opened in 1974, a young woman walked through the door with two little boys. She wanted to know whether the brand-new alcoholism and addiction treatment center in rural Cumberland County, N.J., could help her husband. Seabrook cofounder Margaret "Peg" Diehl gave the visitor the answer she'd learned by heart in the 1960s, when she was struggling to raise her sons while her husband's drinking threatened to destroy their lives - and his. The woman's husband could be offered treatment, "but her family needed help, too," Peg recalls.
NEWS
June 4, 2014 | BY DAN GERINGER, Daily News Staff Writer geringd@phillynews.com, 215-854-5961
CARMEN LOPEZ lives half a block down Frankford Avenue from Healing Way methadone clinic, but she wasn't invited to its invitation-only open house yesterday. So she stood outside and graphically described her fear of the addicts who will soon be coming to her Holmesburg neighborhood for treatment. A big square bandage covered the knife wound in the petite woman's chest. "I couldn't sleep early Saturday morning," Lopez said, "so I walked out on my back porch, and a man who was obviously high on drugs came at me with a knife and stabbed me in the chest.
NEWS
May 30, 2014 | BY WILLIAM BENDER, Daily News Staff Writer benderw@phillynews.com, 215-854-5255
DON TOLLEFSON'S tab has more than doubled, according to Bucks County prosecutors, who now put the total loss from his alleged sports-ticket scheme at about $250,000. Tollefson, charged in February for allegedly ripping off 100 people for about $100,000, was held for trial yesterday after waiving his preliminary hearing in a Bucks County district court. The ex-sports anchor arrived wearing a beige three-piece suit and said he was "feeling strong. " But apparently not contrite.
NEWS
April 21, 2014 | By Angelo Fichera, Inquirer Staff Writer
WASHINGTON TWP. The Rev. John Stabeno calls his Monday-night meetings a sobering dose of "reality. " In the basement of St. Charles Borromeo, dozens of drug addicts and alcoholics and their family members meet weekly to vent, cry, laugh, and smile. Stabeno, a 14-year priest in the Diocese of Camden, says he tries to keep it real himself - right down to his attire. At a recent meeting, he wore loose jeans and a T-shirt as about 60 people gathered in a circle. "He's not just a priest," said Rich Bilo, 26, of Deptford, who on this warm spring night had reached 38 days without alcohol with Stabeno's assistance.
NEWS
April 14, 2014 | By Michael Vitez, Inquirer Staff Writer
The first time Pearson Crosby went to the methadone clinic at the Philadelphia VA Medical Center in early 2013, he asked his father to go with him. But couldn't tell him why. Crosby, who played varsity basketball at Council Rock High School South, had served four years in the United States Marine Corps, with two tours in Iraq. When he came home from war in late 2008, he soon faced another scourge - addiction to prescription pain medications. His life descended into another hell, one maybe worse than war. He couldn't admit to himself, much less to his family, what he'd become.
NEWS
March 28, 2014 | BY DAN GERINGER, Daily News Staff Writer geringd@phillynews.com, 215-854-5961
MOMENTS before she grabbed the Clef Club mic and sang Michael Jackson's "You Are Not Alone" as if she were pleading for her life, Gina Albater said, "I always wanted to be a singer, but I started using drugs when I was 13, so all my dreams went down the drain. " She's 36 now, lucky to be alive, lucky to be dreaming again - and she knows it. Like her fellow competitors in the first round of Recovery Idol 2014 - which ends in September when two finalists will battle at Penn's Landing in front of 20,000 people in recovery - the South Philly singer is now clean and sober, and fighting to stay that way. "I was raised around a bunch of addicts, so I thought that was normal," Albater said.
NEWS
March 24, 2014 | By Ronnie Polaneczky, Daily News Columnist
EVER HAVE A CHAT with an impressively mature kid and wistfully think, "If only I'd known at her age what she knows"? I get that way every time a child shares a sage insight that took me years to learn the hard way. Like last week, when I chilled with teacher Joanna Bottaro's fifth-graders at the Gen. George A. McCall School, on 7th Street near Spruce. The students are researching the phenomena of emotional neglect (which they endearingly refer to as "neglection"). They've managed to boil down the topic to an essential truth that I wish I'd learned decades sooner: We'd all be better off if we listened more closely and more often to each other, with more empathy and less judgment.
NEWS
March 8, 2014 | By Rita Giordano, Inquirer Staff Writer
At Cooper B. Hatch Family School on Thursday, a 17-year-old boy described how his mother introduced him to getting high when he was in the sixth grade. An 18-year-old told the middle-school audience of seeing her boyfriend being stabbed, and of how he died in her lap on the way to the hospital. Another boy admitted selling drugs and robbing even before he got to high school. Yet another described being well on the road to addiction by his teens. All four - all residents in the state's youth correctional and rehabilitation system - are working to reclaim their lives.
NEWS
February 19, 2014
I AM a 28-year-old recovering heroin addict. Having said that, Ms. Flowers, I now need to address your perceptions of addiction and specifically Philip Seymour Hoffman's death. Being educated in this field, both academically and personally, I am blessed with a unique insight into the disease of addiction. And, make no mistake about it, it is a disease. However, it is not a disease like cancer or diabetes, as some like to compare it to. It is a disease not like any other. It is threefold in nature: a mental obsession, like obsessive-compulsive disorder; a physical allergy, like one would have to peanut butter; and a spiritual malady, which I have no words to explain.
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