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NEWS
October 19, 2015 | By Don Sapatkin, Inquirer Staff Writer
Pat McGuckin barely recognized her 39-year-old son. Once a personal trainer and bodybuilder, Michael now was exhausted, his limbs bloated, his mood so volatile that he ripped the phone off her wall. He told his worried mother that he was in pain from a car accident but that a doctor was helping him. On Oct. 21, 2007, his younger brother found Michael in bed, his body cold. A few days later, their mother stared at the words on the death certificate, struggling to understand what had killed her son. She dialed Richard J. Hollawell, a friend of Michael's since childhood in Northeast Philadelphia.
NEWS
April 21, 2014 | By Angelo Fichera, Inquirer Staff Writer
WASHINGTON TWP. The Rev. John Stabeno calls his Monday-night meetings a sobering dose of "reality. " In the basement of St. Charles Borromeo, dozens of drug addicts and alcoholics and their family members meet weekly to vent, cry, laugh, and smile. Stabeno, a 14-year priest in the Diocese of Camden, says he tries to keep it real himself - right down to his attire. At a recent meeting, he wore loose jeans and a T-shirt as about 60 people gathered in a circle. "He's not just a priest," said Rich Bilo, 26, of Deptford, who on this warm spring night had reached 38 days without alcohol with Stabeno's assistance.
NEWS
September 30, 2004
I commend Gov. Rendell's declaration making Sept. 27 "Family Day," and his encouragement that parents talk to their children about drug and alcohol abuse. I'd like to offer a suggestion. Given the direction he is taking Pennsylvania, he might want to encourage parents to speak to their children about gambling addiction, too. As the fastest growing addiction among teens, and one not as easily detected as substance abuse (no slurred speech or dilated pupils), parent will need to speak clearly and firmly about the dangers posed from slot machines and other gambling.
NEWS
May 26, 2006
RE THE MAY 18 letter from Karen (Majewski) Waldsmit: I am a certified addiction counselor and about to complete a graduate-studies program. I have worked on inpatient psychiatric, detox and residential units and am currently working in an outpatient methadone program. I take issue with the statement in the letter that "there is an addictive gene"! Several studies since Blum and Noble's identification of the "common thread" have failed to replicate their findings. This misconception of an identified gene to explain this behavior fosters a perspective that exaggerates the significance of genetic research in addiction and ignores caveats and qualifications.
NEWS
April 30, 1997 | By Gerald K. McOscar
I had my first cigarette when I was about 10. My mother smoked Kents and my father smoked Camels, so it had to have been one of those. My parents knew, of course. They didn't approve, but they knew. But smoking was no big deal in the '50s. Besides, they had other things on their minds, such as feeding four hungry boys, making sure our homework was done and dragging us kicking and screaming out of bed and off to school each morning (always with a breakfast of hot oatmeal whether we wanted the stuff or not)
ENTERTAINMENT
June 20, 2003 | By Amy Phillips FOR THE INQUIRER
On the surface, Lisa Germano's Lullaby for Liquid Pig (Ineffable/Artist Direct), appears to be a concept album about alcoholism. Lyrics about wine, buzzes and "liquid pigs" float in and out of a woozy melodic haze, and songs such as "Dream Glasses Off" and "From a Shell" feel like the sonic equivalent of a lonely, drunken saunter home in the early-morning fog. But the 45-year-old Germano, who gained fame as a violinist in John Mellencamp's band in...
NEWS
April 19, 1990 | BY MATTHEW WEISS
I am an addict. Though I have heard or read thousands of confessions, sordid histories and tales of redemption over the years, I never expected to hear myself say those four words: I am an addict. One thing I can say for my addiction - it's not a lonely one. It is among the most pervasive, insidious, destructive habits in the world, and chances are that if you're reading this article, you are close to someone with this problem. I became a user at 16. This is when most Americans pick up the habit, although it can strike a person at anytime in his or her adult life.
NEWS
October 29, 2006 | By Valerie Reed INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
In Rick Pine's third-story office are inspirational messages painted by his mother on slate fragments. The familiar Serenity Prayer, which asks God for "courage to change the things I can," is propped near his desk in the Bensalem manor that for 40 years has served as headquarters of the Livengrin Foundation, a substance-abuse treatment center. For Pine, president and chief executive officer of the nonprofit center, inspiration comes from reaching out each day to those whose lives are controlled by alcohol or drugs.
NEWS
July 1, 1990 | By Melissa Dribben, Inquirer Staff Writer
Don Newcombe, former star pitcher for the Brooklyn Dodgers, hasn't pitched a game in 28 years. The only reason he picks up baseballs anymore is to sign them. The 8-by-10 glossy black-and-white photograph of him, looking as if he had just thrown a strike, was taken in 1958. He carries copies in his briefcase to autograph for his fans. Newcombe was in Norristown last week, signing baseballs, autographing photos and talking about alcoholism, which he said forced him to give up the career that earned him Rookie of the Year honors in 1949 and the Most Valuable Player and Cy Young Awards in 1956.
NEWS
October 22, 1997
If addicts weren't weak or bad, they wouldn't use drugs, right? And some drugs are addictive psychologically, but not physically, right? Both wrong. But these are true: Addiction is a brain disease. Almost all drugs that get abused - heroin, cocaine, amphetamines, nicotine, PCP, LSD - have much the same effect on the same pathway in the brain. Scientists see this as the common factor in why addicts keep seeking and using drugs regardless of the consequences - including prison or death.
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NEWS
February 5, 2016
ISSUE | DRUG ABUSE A helping hand Concerning the suspected heroin overdose of John Decker, I can attest as a social-service provider to the fact that opiate abuse has hit our cities and suburbs ("Life of promise lost to addiction," Sunday). Heroin found in our region is at its purest levels, making it tremendously dangerous. The young are particularly at risk of overdose. Organizations such as the Samost Jewish Family and Children's Service of Southern New Jersey (JFCS) are taking the lead by educating young adults and their parents.
NEWS
February 1, 2016 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Staff Writer
John Decker, 30, of Gladwyne, a gifted athlete, financial analyst, and loyal friend whose smile "was second to none," died Saturday, Jan. 16, at home. Thomas A. "Tad" and M. Candace Decker found their son unresponsive when they returned home from a trip. The Montgomery County Coroner's Office listed the cause of death as pending while tests were underway. Test results were expected in several weeks. But Mr. Decker's father, vice chairman of the Cozen O'Connor law firm, said he believed his son died of an accidental drug overdose, as he grappled with heroin addiction.
NEWS
January 28, 2016
By Dan Boyle The overdose and death of Brian Fetterman, a resident of Providence Recovery Living in Wallingford, is a deep tragedy and sad reminder of the loss experienced by too many families. This tragic death has been met with fear and anxiety by some neighbors, but to conclude that Providence Recovery Living represents a risk to the community is to fail to understand the function of a sober house or the nature of addiction. I am not a professional in the areas of health care, addiction, or law. However, I do have personal experience with addiction and recovery, and firsthand knowledge of the Providence Recovery Living sober house.
NEWS
January 22, 2016 | BY JASON NARK, Staff Writer
Dealers don't get snow days and addiction doesn't go sledding. When the Philadelphia area gets dumped on by winter's first blizzard this weekend, police, users, hustlers and those in recovery all agree that it won't have much effect on street-level drug sales. It mostly just makes everyone colder and a tad more desperate, a sad situation a little bit sadder, with a backdrop of fresh, white powder. Dealers have more of a choice, like the one standing by a pay phone outside of Sports Kingdom at E. Kensington Avenue and Cambria Street Thursday afternoon.
BUSINESS
January 18, 2016 | By Harold Brubaker, Staff Writer
When King of Prussia developer Brian O'Neill convinced a New York private equity firm to back his fledgling Recovery Centers of America, he capitalized on one key trend: The long stigmatized field of addiction treatment has become one of health care's hottest investment sectors. Federal changes boosting access to care for alcoholics and drug addicts as well as people with mental illness, and growing attention to deaths from prescription painkillers and heroin, are luring investors to buy into addiction treatment.
NEWS
January 15, 2016
DEAR ABBY: I moved overseas for work when I was 18. My father divorced my mom around the same time. I used to come back to the U.S. for two weeks every year to visit and stay with Mom. However, for the past eight years, she has sent me emails "suggesting" in a roundabout way that I was not totally welcome. Because of this, I haven't been back in six years. For the last 20-plus years. I have given my mother about $7,000. Because I'm not welcome in her home, I told her I won't give her any more.
NEWS
January 11, 2016 | By Michael Smerconish
Brian O'Neill's plate was already full in 2011 when an assistant interrupted a meeting to ask whether he'd take a phone call from the wife of a high school friend. The King of Prussia-based developer was enmeshed in the financial crisis, trying to work himself out of a hole that included being ordered to repay $64 million in loans for a pair of local projects. But he didn't hesitate to take the call. That's when he learned that "Francis" had just bottomed out. His 52-year-old friend had been on an alcohol- and drug-induced downward spiral for several years.
NEWS
December 28, 2015
Natalie Pompilio is a Philadelphia writer Marietta admits she's often "an object of curiosity. " The 65-year-old suburban grandmother is a longtime follower of the eating plan endorsed by Food Addicts Anonymous, meaning she doesn't consume anything containing sugar, flour, or wheat. She'll pack her own food before holiday parties, leaving it in the car at first to ensure she won't upset her host by bringing it in. If there's any possibility her food will offend, she'll sip water during the event, eating after she leaves.
NEWS
December 23, 2015 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON, Staff Writer
SOME OF THE women patients of the Diagnostic and Rehabilitation Center in Philadelphia couldn't figure out what Flora Wilson was doing there. It was obvious that she knew her job as a senior residential aide at the drug-and-alcohol-treatment facility, but she was not a recovering addict, so how could she know what the women had gone through? However, it also had to have been obvious to the women that even though Flora had not experienced drug addiction and its horrors - as many of the center's counselors had - she had a natural empathy for those who had. Flora Ruth Wilson, who previously worked with seniors at a nursing home in Germantown and taught all who knew her about courage after she lost a leg to artery disease, died Nov. 18 of respiratory complications.
BUSINESS
December 18, 2015 | By Harold Brubaker, STAFF WRITER
Recovery Centers of America, of King of Prussia, said Wednesday it had secured $231.5 million equity committment from Deerfield Management Co. to build a network of addiction treatment centers. Recovery Centers said it has already acquired eight sites in the Northeastern U.S. and planned to open its first facility in May in Earleville, Md., with additional campuses expected to open next year in the Washington, Boston, and Philadelphia metro areas. J. Brian O'Neill, who founded the company, said he hoped to change the current model of addiction treatment, which often leads patients to travel far from their homes for care.
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