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Addiction

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NEWS
September 30, 2004
I commend Gov. Rendell's declaration making Sept. 27 "Family Day," and his encouragement that parents talk to their children about drug and alcohol abuse. I'd like to offer a suggestion. Given the direction he is taking Pennsylvania, he might want to encourage parents to speak to their children about gambling addiction, too. As the fastest growing addiction among teens, and one not as easily detected as substance abuse (no slurred speech or dilated pupils), parent will need to speak clearly and firmly about the dangers posed from slot machines and other gambling.
NEWS
August 13, 2014 | By Craig LaBan, Inquirer Restaurant Critic
Two months into the life of Zahav, with major reviews still pending for the groundbreaking Israeli restaurant, its star chef suddenly disappeared. Chef Michael Solomonov's culinary star had been rising and nearly $1 million had been invested in this 2008 passion project in Society Hill with partner Steven Cook. "There was no way forward that included failure for Zahav," said Cook. But then Solomonov was nowhere to be found for 10 days. Six years later, the now nationally celebrated chef is finally well enough to reveal where he went: to rehab to deal with his longtime addiction to heroin and crack cocaine.
NEWS
May 26, 2006
RE THE MAY 18 letter from Karen (Majewski) Waldsmit: I am a certified addiction counselor and about to complete a graduate-studies program. I have worked on inpatient psychiatric, detox and residential units and am currently working in an outpatient methadone program. I take issue with the statement in the letter that "there is an addictive gene"! Several studies since Blum and Noble's identification of the "common thread" have failed to replicate their findings. This misconception of an identified gene to explain this behavior fosters a perspective that exaggerates the significance of genetic research in addiction and ignores caveats and qualifications.
NEWS
April 30, 1997 | By Gerald K. McOscar
I had my first cigarette when I was about 10. My mother smoked Kents and my father smoked Camels, so it had to have been one of those. My parents knew, of course. They didn't approve, but they knew. But smoking was no big deal in the '50s. Besides, they had other things on their minds, such as feeding four hungry boys, making sure our homework was done and dragging us kicking and screaming out of bed and off to school each morning (always with a breakfast of hot oatmeal whether we wanted the stuff or not)
ENTERTAINMENT
June 20, 2003 | By Amy Phillips FOR THE INQUIRER
On the surface, Lisa Germano's Lullaby for Liquid Pig (Ineffable/Artist Direct), appears to be a concept album about alcoholism. Lyrics about wine, buzzes and "liquid pigs" float in and out of a woozy melodic haze, and songs such as "Dream Glasses Off" and "From a Shell" feel like the sonic equivalent of a lonely, drunken saunter home in the early-morning fog. But the 45-year-old Germano, who gained fame as a violinist in John Mellencamp's band in...
NEWS
April 19, 1990 | BY MATTHEW WEISS
I am an addict. Though I have heard or read thousands of confessions, sordid histories and tales of redemption over the years, I never expected to hear myself say those four words: I am an addict. One thing I can say for my addiction - it's not a lonely one. It is among the most pervasive, insidious, destructive habits in the world, and chances are that if you're reading this article, you are close to someone with this problem. I became a user at 16. This is when most Americans pick up the habit, although it can strike a person at anytime in his or her adult life.
NEWS
October 29, 2006 | By Valerie Reed INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
In Rick Pine's third-story office are inspirational messages painted by his mother on slate fragments. The familiar Serenity Prayer, which asks God for "courage to change the things I can," is propped near his desk in the Bensalem manor that for 40 years has served as headquarters of the Livengrin Foundation, a substance-abuse treatment center. For Pine, president and chief executive officer of the nonprofit center, inspiration comes from reaching out each day to those whose lives are controlled by alcohol or drugs.
NEWS
July 1, 1990 | By Melissa Dribben, Inquirer Staff Writer
Don Newcombe, former star pitcher for the Brooklyn Dodgers, hasn't pitched a game in 28 years. The only reason he picks up baseballs anymore is to sign them. The 8-by-10 glossy black-and-white photograph of him, looking as if he had just thrown a strike, was taken in 1958. He carries copies in his briefcase to autograph for his fans. Newcombe was in Norristown last week, signing baseballs, autographing photos and talking about alcoholism, which he said forced him to give up the career that earned him Rookie of the Year honors in 1949 and the Most Valuable Player and Cy Young Awards in 1956.
NEWS
October 22, 1997
If addicts weren't weak or bad, they wouldn't use drugs, right? And some drugs are addictive psychologically, but not physically, right? Both wrong. But these are true: Addiction is a brain disease. Almost all drugs that get abused - heroin, cocaine, amphetamines, nicotine, PCP, LSD - have much the same effect on the same pathway in the brain. Scientists see this as the common factor in why addicts keep seeking and using drugs regardless of the consequences - including prison or death.
NEWS
August 10, 1988 | By Desmond Ryan, Inquirer Movie Critic
One of the most predictable wrongs of spring - apart from the unfounded aura of optimism emanating from the Phillies camp - is the way great comic acting is slighted in the Oscar voting. True, Robin Williams was nominated this year for Good Morning, Vietnam, but he had no real shot at winning an Academy Award. More typically, Steve Martin's brilliant work in Roxanne was overlooked entirely. It's no wonder then that our leading comic actors feel compelled to take serious roles in order to be taken seriously by their peers.
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NEWS
October 11, 2014 | By Maddie Hanna, Inquirer Trenton Bureau
TRENTON - Between frequent trips out of state campaigning for Republicans, Gov. Christie has been spending much of his time at home talking about one topic: addiction. In one month, Christie has held events focused on addiction on four of the nine days he has appeared publicly in New Jersey - including Thursday, when he announced formation of a task force to improve prevention and treatment. "We need to continue to make change and deal with addiction differently," Christie said at a news conference at Catholic Charities of the Diocese of Trenton, where he said he had met with several women recovering from addiction.
NEWS
October 10, 2014 | By Mister Mann Frisby, For The Inquirer
Long before national morning talk shows became enthralled with Fifty Shades of Grey , Zane had the tongues of hot and bothered readers wagging nonstop. For more than a decade, fans of wildly popular Zane novels have been burning their fingertips on her steamy page-turners. And Friday, the reigning queen of erotic fiction will see Addicted , one of her 30 titles to date, hit the big screen. The foray into the world of erotic literature was at first anonymous for Zane. Because of the nature of her books, the Maryland author initially did not even tell her family and closest friends she was the writer behind the popular and sexually charged material.
NEWS
October 2, 2014 | By Maddie Hanna, Inquirer Trenton Bureau
NEWARK, N.J. - Gov. Christie joined with the pastor of a church here Tuesday to call for lessening the stigma of drug addiction, invoking a friend's death as he sought to frame the issue as a universal problem. Addiction "can and does happen to anyone," Christie said, after treatment providers, family members, and recovering addicts shared their perspectives during a summit at the New Hope Baptist Church that also was led by Pastor Joe A. Carter. In front of more than 200 people - some involved in addiction-treatment programs - the Republican governor said he had made repeated efforts to help a former law school classmate who died this year after struggling with an addiction to painkillers.
NEWS
October 1, 2014 | BY DAVID GAMBACORTA, Daily News Staff Writer gambacd@phillynews.com, 215-854-5994
IN THE END, "Tollie" had no choice but to enter the guilty plea. The line of people who were ready to take the stand and testify that they'd been ripped off by former local TV sportscaster Don Tollefson was already long - and, ominously, still growing. So Tollefson pleaded guilty in Bucks County court yesterday to scamming more than 200 people out of at least $317,000 by peddling bogus sports-ticket packages that were supposed to benefit a host of different charities. It remains to be seen if his dramatic fall from grace will include a lengthy prison term.
NEWS
September 16, 2014 | BY WENDY RUDERMAN, Daily News Staff Writer rudermw@phillynews.com, 215-854-5924
THERE IS NO formal state oversight of recovery homes. No regulations. No certification. No licensure. And for a city like Philadelphia, where addiction is endemic and hundreds of recovery homes operate largely off the grid, the lack of controls creates a free-wheeling landscape rife for abuse. "Right now, you have recovery homes that are actually good stewards in the sense that they are in it for the right reasons and provide sober, clean and safe living environments because they want people to be successful in their recovery," said state Rep. Frank Farry, R-Bucks County.
NEWS
September 10, 2014 | BY JASON NARK, Daily News Staff Writer narkj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5916
THERE'S A PART that Peter Bruun is expected to play in the drama of his daughter's death, but he's tossed that script and taken a different approach toward the South Philly man who police say is responsible for her fatal overdose. The Baltimore artist says he never wanted Sean Michael Harrington arrested or prosecuted, even though Harrington is charged with second-degree murder for allegedly mailing heroin and cocaine to Elisif Bruun while she was in a recovery center in North Carolina.
NEWS
August 21, 2014 | BY JASON NARK, Daily News Staff Writer narkj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5916
THE IMAGE OF a guy in baggy jeans appearing to buy drugs near a gated driveway in Camden is stuck in time forever, or until Goggle remaps Carman Street, with no way to know who the blurry-faced buyer was or where he went after getting high. But T.J., a former heroin addict who once copped dope at that fence almost daily, said he can see himself in that nameless stranger and knows that heroin likely drove the guy down a hard road to death, jail or, like himself, recovery. The 28-year-old Cherry Hill native, who now lives in Pennsylvania and works as a counselor's assistant at a treatment facility, said he was on Google Maps looking for directions and found that his route would take him through Camden.
NEWS
August 13, 2014 | By Craig LaBan, Inquirer Restaurant Critic
Two months into the life of Zahav, with major reviews still pending for the groundbreaking Israeli restaurant, its star chef suddenly disappeared. Chef Michael Solomonov's culinary star had been rising and nearly $1 million had been invested in this 2008 passion project in Society Hill with partner Steven Cook. "There was no way forward that included failure for Zahav," said Cook. But then Solomonov was nowhere to be found for 10 days. Six years later, the now nationally celebrated chef is finally well enough to reveal where he went: to rehab to deal with his longtime addiction to heroin and crack cocaine.
NEWS
August 8, 2014 | By Michael Boren, Inquirer Staff Writer
Tears dripped from Sona Turner's face as she drove, but her lips stayed silent. It had been more than five months since an unknown killer had stuffed her 30-year-old daughter, Tara Alicea, into a suitcase and left it in the woods behind Egg Harbor Township's Harbor Square mall. Now, as Turner drove past the mall to drop off her boyfriend at a bus station, she felt like vomiting. On the way home to Clayton, Turner's granddaughter - Alicea's 8-year-old daughter, Nilza - moved to the front seat and asked to wear her grandmother's glasses.
NEWS
July 25, 2014 | BY JULIE SHAW, Daily News Staff Writer shawj@phillynews.com, 215-854-2592
A SOUTH PHILLY drug addict who conspired with a Philly police officer to steal drugs from dealers was sentenced yesterday in federal court to 10 months behind bars. Robert Nagy, 26, was awarded for cooperating with the government, and as part of his sentence was ordered to continue cooperating with the feds. The identity of the cop with whom he conspired was not revealed in court and has not been revealed in public court documents. He has been identified only by the initials C.S. Nagy pleaded guilty in April to conspiracy to commit extortion.
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