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NEWS
September 30, 2004
I commend Gov. Rendell's declaration making Sept. 27 "Family Day," and his encouragement that parents talk to their children about drug and alcohol abuse. I'd like to offer a suggestion. Given the direction he is taking Pennsylvania, he might want to encourage parents to speak to their children about gambling addiction, too. As the fastest growing addiction among teens, and one not as easily detected as substance abuse (no slurred speech or dilated pupils), parent will need to speak clearly and firmly about the dangers posed from slot machines and other gambling.
NEWS
May 26, 2006
RE THE MAY 18 letter from Karen (Majewski) Waldsmit: I am a certified addiction counselor and about to complete a graduate-studies program. I have worked on inpatient psychiatric, detox and residential units and am currently working in an outpatient methadone program. I take issue with the statement in the letter that "there is an addictive gene"! Several studies since Blum and Noble's identification of the "common thread" have failed to replicate their findings. This misconception of an identified gene to explain this behavior fosters a perspective that exaggerates the significance of genetic research in addiction and ignores caveats and qualifications.
NEWS
April 30, 1997 | By Gerald K. McOscar
I had my first cigarette when I was about 10. My mother smoked Kents and my father smoked Camels, so it had to have been one of those. My parents knew, of course. They didn't approve, but they knew. But smoking was no big deal in the '50s. Besides, they had other things on their minds, such as feeding four hungry boys, making sure our homework was done and dragging us kicking and screaming out of bed and off to school each morning (always with a breakfast of hot oatmeal whether we wanted the stuff or not)
ENTERTAINMENT
June 20, 2003 | By Amy Phillips FOR THE INQUIRER
On the surface, Lisa Germano's Lullaby for Liquid Pig (Ineffable/Artist Direct), appears to be a concept album about alcoholism. Lyrics about wine, buzzes and "liquid pigs" float in and out of a woozy melodic haze, and songs such as "Dream Glasses Off" and "From a Shell" feel like the sonic equivalent of a lonely, drunken saunter home in the early-morning fog. But the 45-year-old Germano, who gained fame as a violinist in John Mellencamp's band in...
NEWS
April 19, 1990 | BY MATTHEW WEISS
I am an addict. Though I have heard or read thousands of confessions, sordid histories and tales of redemption over the years, I never expected to hear myself say those four words: I am an addict. One thing I can say for my addiction - it's not a lonely one. It is among the most pervasive, insidious, destructive habits in the world, and chances are that if you're reading this article, you are close to someone with this problem. I became a user at 16. This is when most Americans pick up the habit, although it can strike a person at anytime in his or her adult life.
NEWS
October 29, 2006 | By Valerie Reed INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
In Rick Pine's third-story office are inspirational messages painted by his mother on slate fragments. The familiar Serenity Prayer, which asks God for "courage to change the things I can," is propped near his desk in the Bensalem manor that for 40 years has served as headquarters of the Livengrin Foundation, a substance-abuse treatment center. For Pine, president and chief executive officer of the nonprofit center, inspiration comes from reaching out each day to those whose lives are controlled by alcohol or drugs.
NEWS
July 1, 1990 | By Melissa Dribben, Inquirer Staff Writer
Don Newcombe, former star pitcher for the Brooklyn Dodgers, hasn't pitched a game in 28 years. The only reason he picks up baseballs anymore is to sign them. The 8-by-10 glossy black-and-white photograph of him, looking as if he had just thrown a strike, was taken in 1958. He carries copies in his briefcase to autograph for his fans. Newcombe was in Norristown last week, signing baseballs, autographing photos and talking about alcoholism, which he said forced him to give up the career that earned him Rookie of the Year honors in 1949 and the Most Valuable Player and Cy Young Awards in 1956.
NEWS
October 22, 1997
If addicts weren't weak or bad, they wouldn't use drugs, right? And some drugs are addictive psychologically, but not physically, right? Both wrong. But these are true: Addiction is a brain disease. Almost all drugs that get abused - heroin, cocaine, amphetamines, nicotine, PCP, LSD - have much the same effect on the same pathway in the brain. Scientists see this as the common factor in why addicts keep seeking and using drugs regardless of the consequences - including prison or death.
NEWS
August 10, 1988 | By Desmond Ryan, Inquirer Movie Critic
One of the most predictable wrongs of spring - apart from the unfounded aura of optimism emanating from the Phillies camp - is the way great comic acting is slighted in the Oscar voting. True, Robin Williams was nominated this year for Good Morning, Vietnam, but he had no real shot at winning an Academy Award. More typically, Steve Martin's brilliant work in Roxanne was overlooked entirely. It's no wonder then that our leading comic actors feel compelled to take serious roles in order to be taken seriously by their peers.
NEWS
March 26, 2007 | By JUDY SHEPPS BATTLE
WHEN MY sons were young, they would take baseball cards to school to "flip" - heads you win, tails you lose, winner take all. Some days they came home in tears because they'd lost their favorite cards. Their father and I would wipe their noses and lecture them on the perils of betting. When they got to middle school, the tears stopped, but I did notice that many days they returned home extremely hungry. I heard stories about poker games in the boys' restroom but didn't give it much thought.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
June 20, 2016 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Staff Writer
Matthew Jonathon Bennett, 25, of Villanova, an aspiring entrepreneur who struggled with addiction for the last 11 years, died Sunday, June 12, of a drug overdose in Baltimore. Known as Matt, Mr. Bennett was found unresponsive in his car outside a Wawa after leaving a rehab program two days shy of completion. He could not be revived, his family said. The Maryland Medical Examiner's Office said the case was under investigation. Starting in his early teens, Mr. Bennett's life was a roller-coaster ride, with joyful, creative, and productive times interrupted by steep slides into depression and self-recrimination.
NEWS
June 8, 2016 | By Stephanie Farr, Staff Writer
It was the summer of 2015, and Philadelphia Police Officer Thomas Vitanovitz was ashamed – and addicted. Two shoulder surgeries from on-the-job injuries had led to a prescription for pain pills, and when it was time to stop taking them, he couldn't. "By the time I needed help, I was scared, extremely scared," he said. "I was embarrassed and ashamed to be a cop that has a pill problem. " In a telephone interview Monday, just hours after the U.S. Attorney's Office charged him with attempted extortion - and a police spokesman confirmed he had been suspended for 30 days with the intent to dismiss - Vitanovitz, 31, shared his story of addiction, recovery, and gratitude.
NEWS
May 28, 2016 | By Don Sapatkin, Staff Writer
With effective therapy for opioid addiction in short supply, the Food and Drug Administration on Thursday approved a new option that is both groundbreaking and familiar. Probuphine, a six-month implant the size of a matchstick, will be the longest-acting therapy on the market. The medication that it dispenses, buprenorphine, is one of the most common for addiction to pain pills and heroin, currently available only in daily doses. The new formulation, from Braeburn Pharmaceuticals, a small, Princeton-based company, is intended for people in stable, long-term recovery who have been on low amounts of the oral medication for at least six months.
NEWS
May 27, 2016
ISSUE | PUBLIC HEALTH Let's call a cigarette a cigarette I applaud the Food and Drug Administration's recent ruling to ban e-cigarette sales to minors and require safety reviews for vaping products ("Thank you for not vaping?" May 17). Like traditional cigarettes, e-cigarettes contain nicotine, an extremely addictive substance. And e-cigarette products have been found to contain harmful chemicals than can cause respiratory disease. Should we be asking the public to "pick their poison," or should we be educating them that no matter what type of cigarette they smoke, they are putting their health at risk?
NEWS
May 26, 2016 | By Mike Newall, Columnist
Matt sits on a crate outside Jefferson Station, panhandling for the $10 bag of heroin that will get him through the next few hours. Some nights, the 28-year-old Army veteran from Horsham sleeps in the doorways of Midtown Village boutiques, other nights in the underpass outside the Convention Center. He tries not to think of the life he had, not so long ago, in his suburban hometown: an apartment, a $25,000 truck, a landscaping business with his father, a king-size bed. Tries not to dwell on the question he cannot answer: "What are you doing with yourself?"
NEWS
May 24, 2016 | BY JASON NARK, STAFF WRITER
On a cold March morning in Columbus, N.C., Sean Harrington sat shackled in an antebellum courthouse and saw through the window a mountain stretched out like a vast wall. The wind rattled bare trees there on White Oak Mountain and whipped up the falls on Horse Creek as it flowed south toward town. The sky above the Polk County Courthouse had been swept clean of clouds and Harrington's family filed past an American flag that thrashed atop a pole. The tallest thing Harrington, 26, had ever seen on Hancock Street, 600 miles away in South Philadelphia, was a telephone pole, and depending how his day in court went, he knew he might be an old man before he saw that skinny block by I-95 again.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 5, 2016 | By Tirdad Derakhshani, Staff Writer
Prince sought help Prince 's death has been made all the more poignant by a report that the pop genius had sought to meet with a drug-addiction specialist a day before he died, reports the Minneapolis Star Tribune. Minnesota lawyer William Mauzy says Prince's peeps reached out to his client, California doc Howard Kornfeld , on April 20. Kornfeld could not travel to Minnesota that day, so Mauzy arranged for the singer to meet with a local doctor the next morning - the day Prince was found dead.
BUSINESS
April 25, 2016 | By Jane M. Von Bergen, Staff Writer
For many, the path from opioid use to heroin addiction begins at work when an injury sustained on the job is treated, or rather, over-treated, with painkillers such as Oxycontin or Vicodin. "So, the original injury might have been a back, a knee, a shoulder that obviously you would hope could be treated, and [the worker] healed and returned to employment," explained Peter C. Madeja, 57, chief executive and president of Genex Services L.L.C. in Wayne. Genex handles workers' compensation claims for businesses as they try to keep medical costs down and return employees to work.
NEWS
April 6, 2016 | By Kevin Riordan, Columnist
Rafael Morales, who says he wants to get clean again, relishes a sandwich in the cold sunshine outside an East Camden 7-Eleven. The 45-year-old former cabdriver has come to the right place: Volunteers from the Faces of Change ministry are here, serving ham and cheese on white, hot soup, and hope. The weekly outreach, led by Wil and Lucy DuBose, of the Calvary Assembly of God Church in Pennsauken, offers alcoholics and other addicts a way off the street and into long-term inpatient treatment.
NEWS
April 4, 2016
American Girls Social Media and the Secret Lives of Teenagers By Nancy Jo Sales Knopf. 416 pp. $26.95. Reviewed by Hillary Rea Selfie. Thot. Yik Yak. Savage. Aesthetic. Slut pages. Emoji. Kik. Tinder. Tumblr. Snapchat. Such jargon pops up on page after page in Nancy Jo Sales' engrossing exposé, American Girls: Social Media and the Secret Lives of Teenagers . Sales, 51, is the author of The Bling Ring , which inspired the movie of the same name.
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