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Addiction

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NEWS
February 4, 2015 | By Jessica Parks, Inquirer Staff Writer
Judge Steven T. O'Neill is used to hearing tales of addiction, depression, and cries for help in his Montgomery County drug court. But Monday's scene, with about 50 well-to-do Main Line supporters coming out to speak on behalf of one young defendant, was unusual. Timothy C. Brooks, 19, of Villanova, pleaded guilty in October to five charges as the No. 2 man in a drug ring that sought to corner the market on marijuana sales at Main Line prep schools. The operation was short-lived and its scope was modest in comparison to its extraordinarily high media profile.
NEWS
September 30, 2004
I commend Gov. Rendell's declaration making Sept. 27 "Family Day," and his encouragement that parents talk to their children about drug and alcohol abuse. I'd like to offer a suggestion. Given the direction he is taking Pennsylvania, he might want to encourage parents to speak to their children about gambling addiction, too. As the fastest growing addiction among teens, and one not as easily detected as substance abuse (no slurred speech or dilated pupils), parent will need to speak clearly and firmly about the dangers posed from slot machines and other gambling.
NEWS
May 26, 2006
RE THE MAY 18 letter from Karen (Majewski) Waldsmit: I am a certified addiction counselor and about to complete a graduate-studies program. I have worked on inpatient psychiatric, detox and residential units and am currently working in an outpatient methadone program. I take issue with the statement in the letter that "there is an addictive gene"! Several studies since Blum and Noble's identification of the "common thread" have failed to replicate their findings. This misconception of an identified gene to explain this behavior fosters a perspective that exaggerates the significance of genetic research in addiction and ignores caveats and qualifications.
NEWS
April 30, 1997 | By Gerald K. McOscar
I had my first cigarette when I was about 10. My mother smoked Kents and my father smoked Camels, so it had to have been one of those. My parents knew, of course. They didn't approve, but they knew. But smoking was no big deal in the '50s. Besides, they had other things on their minds, such as feeding four hungry boys, making sure our homework was done and dragging us kicking and screaming out of bed and off to school each morning (always with a breakfast of hot oatmeal whether we wanted the stuff or not)
ENTERTAINMENT
June 20, 2003 | By Amy Phillips FOR THE INQUIRER
On the surface, Lisa Germano's Lullaby for Liquid Pig (Ineffable/Artist Direct), appears to be a concept album about alcoholism. Lyrics about wine, buzzes and "liquid pigs" float in and out of a woozy melodic haze, and songs such as "Dream Glasses Off" and "From a Shell" feel like the sonic equivalent of a lonely, drunken saunter home in the early-morning fog. But the 45-year-old Germano, who gained fame as a violinist in John Mellencamp's band in...
NEWS
April 19, 1990 | BY MATTHEW WEISS
I am an addict. Though I have heard or read thousands of confessions, sordid histories and tales of redemption over the years, I never expected to hear myself say those four words: I am an addict. One thing I can say for my addiction - it's not a lonely one. It is among the most pervasive, insidious, destructive habits in the world, and chances are that if you're reading this article, you are close to someone with this problem. I became a user at 16. This is when most Americans pick up the habit, although it can strike a person at anytime in his or her adult life.
NEWS
October 29, 2006 | By Valerie Reed INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
In Rick Pine's third-story office are inspirational messages painted by his mother on slate fragments. The familiar Serenity Prayer, which asks God for "courage to change the things I can," is propped near his desk in the Bensalem manor that for 40 years has served as headquarters of the Livengrin Foundation, a substance-abuse treatment center. For Pine, president and chief executive officer of the nonprofit center, inspiration comes from reaching out each day to those whose lives are controlled by alcohol or drugs.
NEWS
July 1, 1990 | By Melissa Dribben, Inquirer Staff Writer
Don Newcombe, former star pitcher for the Brooklyn Dodgers, hasn't pitched a game in 28 years. The only reason he picks up baseballs anymore is to sign them. The 8-by-10 glossy black-and-white photograph of him, looking as if he had just thrown a strike, was taken in 1958. He carries copies in his briefcase to autograph for his fans. Newcombe was in Norristown last week, signing baseballs, autographing photos and talking about alcoholism, which he said forced him to give up the career that earned him Rookie of the Year honors in 1949 and the Most Valuable Player and Cy Young Awards in 1956.
NEWS
October 22, 1997
If addicts weren't weak or bad, they wouldn't use drugs, right? And some drugs are addictive psychologically, but not physically, right? Both wrong. But these are true: Addiction is a brain disease. Almost all drugs that get abused - heroin, cocaine, amphetamines, nicotine, PCP, LSD - have much the same effect on the same pathway in the brain. Scientists see this as the common factor in why addicts keep seeking and using drugs regardless of the consequences - including prison or death.
NEWS
August 10, 1988 | By Desmond Ryan, Inquirer Movie Critic
One of the most predictable wrongs of spring - apart from the unfounded aura of optimism emanating from the Phillies camp - is the way great comic acting is slighted in the Oscar voting. True, Robin Williams was nominated this year for Good Morning, Vietnam, but he had no real shot at winning an Academy Award. More typically, Steve Martin's brilliant work in Roxanne was overlooked entirely. It's no wonder then that our leading comic actors feel compelled to take serious roles in order to be taken seriously by their peers.
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NEWS
February 6, 2015 | By Helen Ubinas, Daily News Columnist
NO PARENT ever dreams their kid will become an addict. If that weren't obvious enough, it lay bare in the despair and desperation on the faces of many of the parents who attended a recent forum about young people struggling with substance abuse. Nancy and Kevin Peter, of West Mount Airy, were panelists at the Horsham Township Community Center forum last week. When it was their turn to speak, Nancy began with an admission that moved other parents to nod in agreement. When the Peters envisioned their only son's life, addiction wasn't part of it. "I suspect it's what happens when a child is suddenly hurt in an accident, or is stricken with a disease . . . parents have to 'recalibrate' the future they envisioned for their son or daughter," she later said.
NEWS
February 4, 2015 | By Jessica Parks, Inquirer Staff Writer
Judge Steven T. O'Neill is used to hearing tales of addiction, depression, and cries for help in his Montgomery County drug court. But Monday's scene, with about 50 well-to-do Main Line supporters coming out to speak on behalf of one young defendant, was unusual. Timothy C. Brooks, 19, of Villanova, pleaded guilty in October to five charges as the No. 2 man in a drug ring that sought to corner the market on marijuana sales at Main Line prep schools. The operation was short-lived and its scope was modest in comparison to its extraordinarily high media profile.
NEWS
January 30, 2015 | BY GARY THOMPSON, Daily News Staff Writer thompsg@phillynews.com, 215-854-5992
"BLACK OR WHITE" is a movie about race that should have been called "Crack or White Label" for the way it gets lost in subplots about addiction. Kevin Costner stars as Elliot, a wealthy lawyer raising a mixed-race granddaughter (Jillian Estell) born to his now-dead daughter and a black man (Andre Holland) in the throes of addiction. When Elliot's own wife dies, he succumbs to a pattern of alcohol abuse that causes the child's paternal grandmother, Rowena (Octavia Spencer), to sue for custody.
NEWS
January 26, 2015 | BY DANA DiFILIPPO, Daily News Staff Writer difilid@phillynews.com, 215-854-5934
PROSTITUTES looking to leave the streets behind just got some good news: City prisons officials have agreed to help fund a halfway house intended to help women break the cycle of prostitution. The $214,000 approved will fund salaries, training and some supplies for one year at Breaking the Cycle, a program University of Pennsylvania nursing professor Kathleen Brown designed and partnered with the Rev. Michelle Simmons to run at Simmons' halfway house in Germantown. "This is going to be a blessing," said Simmons, who has run transitional housing for ex-offenders since 2003.
NEWS
January 26, 2015 | By Robert Calandra, For The Inquirer
A year before Healthy Pennsylvania's rollout, Michael Harle, president and CEO of Gaudenzia, the drug and alcohol treatment center, was assured by top state Medicaid officials his clients would not see their health insurance change. Harle has been around. So he asked for that guarantee in writing. He didn't get it. A high-placed executive "promised me that they would get it right," he said. But "they" didn't. After Medicaid recipients began shifting to the new program on Dec. 1, "all hell broke loose," Harle said.
NEWS
January 16, 2015 | By Helen Ubinas, Daily News Columnist
IN 1999, DOUGLAS KRATZ was a $200-a-day heroin addict. Nothing mattered but his next fix. That's all he was thinking about when he and an acquaintance were arrested by two SEPTA cops one October night. Officers Eric Cohn and Steven Zambon were on patrol around the North Broad railroad station shortly after 9 p.m. Oct. 18 when they spotted Kratz and a woman on the outbound platform with drug paraphernalia, according to a transit police report. They later discovered a needle and seven small bags of heroin known on the streets as "Al Pacino.
NEWS
January 8, 2015 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON, Daily News Staff Writer morrisj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5573
IT WAS ALL about love. And Tony Neri had an abundance of it. What else could have driven him out of his warm house on a bitter-cold New Year's Eve to check on the broken furnace of a desperate elderly woman in Southwest Philadelphia? Tony was in the basement of the home, working on the furnace, doing what he felt destined to do with his life - helping people in need - when he collapsed. He was rushed to Lankenau Medical Center, where he was pronounced dead of a ruptured aorta.
NEWS
October 11, 2014 | By Maddie Hanna, Inquirer Trenton Bureau
TRENTON - Between frequent trips out of state campaigning for Republicans, Gov. Christie has been spending much of his time at home talking about one topic: addiction. In one month, Christie has held events focused on addiction on four of the nine days he has appeared publicly in New Jersey - including Thursday, when he announced formation of a task force to improve prevention and treatment. "We need to continue to make change and deal with addiction differently," Christie said at a news conference at Catholic Charities of the Diocese of Trenton, where he said he had met with several women recovering from addiction.
NEWS
October 10, 2014 | By Mister Mann Frisby, For The Inquirer
Long before national morning talk shows became enthralled with Fifty Shades of Grey , Zane had the tongues of hot and bothered readers wagging nonstop. For more than a decade, fans of wildly popular Zane novels have been burning their fingertips on her steamy page-turners. And Friday, the reigning queen of erotic fiction will see Addicted , one of her 30 titles to date, hit the big screen. The foray into the world of erotic literature was at first anonymous for Zane. Because of the nature of her books, the Maryland author initially did not even tell her family and closest friends she was the writer behind the popular and sexually charged material.
NEWS
October 2, 2014 | By Maddie Hanna, Inquirer Trenton Bureau
NEWARK, N.J. - Gov. Christie joined with the pastor of a church here Tuesday to call for lessening the stigma of drug addiction, invoking a friend's death as he sought to frame the issue as a universal problem. Addiction "can and does happen to anyone," Christie said, after treatment providers, family members, and recovering addicts shared their perspectives during a summit at the New Hope Baptist Church that also was led by Pastor Joe A. Carter. In front of more than 200 people - some involved in addiction-treatment programs - the Republican governor said he had made repeated efforts to help a former law school classmate who died this year after struggling with an addiction to painkillers.
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