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NEWS
July 15, 2012 | By Christopher Elliott and Tribune Media Services
Jeff Emerson missed his flight from Minneapolis to Washington. He didn't make his connection to Addis Ababa, Ethiopia, and didn't arrive as scheduled in Kilimanjaro, Tanzania, where he was supposed to start work as a summer volunteer. The story of Emerson's delay is fascinating — maybe a little infuriating, too — for anyone flying this summer, particularly internationally. It raises an important question about who takes responsibility for delays that are beyond a passenger's control.
NEWS
September 3, 2012 | By Kirubel Tadesse, Associated Press
ADDIS ABABA, Ethiopia - Thousands of mourners gathered near a public square in Ethiopia's capital on Sunday to pay their final respects to Prime Minister Meles Zenawi, who was praised for lifting many out of poverty but vilified by some for restricting freedoms. Meles, who ruled for 21 years, died Aug. 20 of an undisclosed illness in a Belgian hospital. He was 57. During his rule, Ethiopia was a strong U.S. ally on counterterrorism issues, particularly in Somalia, and some saw him as Africa's intellectual leader in efforts to fight poverty.
NEWS
August 6, 2011 | By Sally A. Downey, Inquirer Staff Writer
Mae Goldstein Lutz, 85, of Center City, a former social worker in Philadelphia and press attache in Ethiopia who operated a jewelry store on Rittenhouse Square for more than 15 years, died of lung cancer Tuesday, Aug. 2, at Vitas Hospice at Methodist Hospital. Mrs. Lutz opened Repliqué in a beauty salon in 1977 and soon afterward moved the enterprise to the nearby Warwick Hotel at 17th and Locust Streets. A son, Barry Lutz, said Repliqué specialized in jewelry inspired by Tiffany, Cartier, and Van Cleef & Arpels, but sold at a fraction of the cost.
SPORTS
February 26, 1998 | By Sabrina Yohannes, FOR THE INQUIRER
Ethiopian distance running sensation Haile Gebrselassie was presented the Jesse Owens International Trophy award in New York last night, becoming the first black African to receive the prestigious honor. Previous winners of the award - which honors outstanding sportsmanship in athletics - include Michael Johnson, Carl Lewis and distance runners Sebastian Coe of Britain and Wang Junxia of China. The only other African athlete to have received this distinction is 1986 recipient Said Aouita of Morocco.
NEWS
July 28, 1988 | By Steve Goldstein, Inquirer Staff Writer
An Armenian dissident, stripped of his citizenship by Soviet authorities for leading nationalist demonstrations, has been expelled to Ethiopia, where he has applied to the U.S. Embassy for residence in the United States, the dissident's family said yesterday. Paruir Airikyan was "transported by force" to Addis Ababa on July 21, one day after the Kremlin stripped him of his citizenship, his mother-in-law, Ninel Serotenko, said in an interview yesterday in Moscow. Ethiopia is a strong Kremlin ally and its president, Mengistu Haile Mariam, is currently on a state visit to Moscow.
NEWS
September 24, 2012
China cancels its Japan events TOKYO - China has canceled events to commemorate 40 years of diplomatic relations with Japan, further signaling its anger over a simmering territorial dispute. Japanese Foreign Ministry official Hiroaki Sakamoto confirmed that China has canceled events, planned for Thursday. China's Xinhua news agency, citing officials with the China-Japan Friendship Association and another government-affiliated group, reported Sunday that the events would be held "at a proper time.
NEWS
May 29, 2000 | By Thomas L. Kirkpatrick
On May 12 Ethiopia opened its latest offensive against its northern neighbor Eritrea, an assault that quickly reclaimed some of the territory lost along their ill-defined common border in May 1998. The new onslaught reignited battles on three fronts: around the towns of Badme in the west, Zalambesa in the central highlands, and Bure in the east. Ethiopia promised a speedy end to the conflict this time. They had set a tentative victory date for May 24. The disputes date back to 1962, when Eritrea's Red Sea ports of Assab and Massawa caught the eye Ethiopia's Emperor Haile Selassie.
NEWS
December 23, 2004 | By Murray Dubin INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
An immigrant family success: Almaz Kebede, now 50, is a single parent with three children who lived in a homeless shelter, but she has a home in Ardmore. She works at Strawbridge's. Her older daughter, Senayish Addis, 26, is a graduate student at Bryn Mawr College who works finding housing for the disabled. Her son, Alemayehu, 25, is a graduate of the University of Pennsylvania now serving in the Army in Afghanistan. Her daughter Bruktaweit, 15, is in high school. Their success comes despite a gaping hole, a sadness you can see in pictures on the wall that show three children, a mother and a father.
NEWS
April 19, 1988 | By Robert J. Terry, Inquirer Staff Writer
A woman who fled political persecution in Ethiopia for safety in the United States was found stabbed to death yesterday in her West Philadelphia apartment, police said. Mezgebnesh Abayu, 32, was found dead on the floor of the apartment she shared with her sister and brother-in-law in the 4800 block of Springfield Avenue, according to police. Abayu's sister, Tenagne Workeshetu, 26, discovered the body when she came home for lunch at 12:30 p.m. and called police, investigators said.
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NEWS
June 3, 2013
Europe facing flood threat BERLIN - Authorities in parts of central Europe issued disaster warnings and scrambled to reinforce flood defenses Sunday as rivers swelled by days of heavy rain threatened to burst their banks. Several people have died or are missing in the floods in Germany, the Czech Republic, and Switzerland since Thursday. Some residents also have been evacuated from flooding in southwestern Poland, as well as in Austria and Switzerland. Czech officials said waters of the Vltava River could reach critical levels in Prague and metal walls were being erected to prevent flooding.
NEWS
December 30, 2012 | By Jason Straziuso, Associated Press
WENCHI, Ethiopia - The children in this village wear filthy, ragged clothes. They sleep beside cows and sheep in huts made of sticks and mud. They have no school. Yet they all can chant the English alphabet, and some can make words. The key to their success: 20 tablet computers dropped off in their village in February by a U.S. group called One Laptop Per Child. The goal is to find out whether kids using today's technology can teach themselves to read in places where no schools or teachers exist.
NEWS
September 3, 2012 | By Kirubel Tadesse, Associated Press
ADDIS ABABA, Ethiopia - Thousands of mourners gathered near a public square in Ethiopia's capital on Sunday to pay their final respects to Prime Minister Meles Zenawi, who was praised for lifting many out of poverty but vilified by some for restricting freedoms. Meles, who ruled for 21 years, died Aug. 20 of an undisclosed illness in a Belgian hospital. He was 57. During his rule, Ethiopia was a strong U.S. ally on counterterrorism issues, particularly in Somalia, and some saw him as Africa's intellectual leader in efforts to fight poverty.
NEWS
July 25, 2012 | By Francis Kokutse and Krista Larson, Associated Press
ACCRA, Ghana - John Atta Mills, 68, who was elected president in the closest vote in Ghana's history and then led the West African country amid newfound oil wealth, died Tuesday just months before the end of his first term. Ghanaian state-run television stations GTV and TV3 broke into regular programming to announce the president's death. Chief of staff John Henry Martey Newman told the nation that Mr. Atta Mills had died Tuesday afternoon at the 37th Military Hospital in Accra but gave no details about the cause of his death.
NEWS
July 15, 2012 | By Christopher Elliott and Tribune Media Services
Jeff Emerson missed his flight from Minneapolis to Washington. He didn't make his connection to Addis Ababa, Ethiopia, and didn't arrive as scheduled in Kilimanjaro, Tanzania, where he was supposed to start work as a summer volunteer. The story of Emerson's delay is fascinating — maybe a little infuriating, too — for anyone flying this summer, particularly internationally. It raises an important question about who takes responsibility for delays that are beyond a passenger's control.
NEWS
February 28, 2012 | By Ahmed Al-Haj, Associated Press
SAN'A, Yemen - Aides to Ali Abdullah Saleh said Monday that the ousted Yemeni president plans to go into exile in Ethiopia, as pressures mounted on him to depart the country for fear of sparking new cycles of violence. The news that the longtime Yemeni leader might leave for Ethiopia marks the latest twist in the meandering story of Saleh's fall from grace. As rumors have circulated of Saleh's seeking refuge in a myriad of countries including Oman and the United Arab Emirates, where some of his family is already setting up residence, he has lingered on in Yemen, much to the dismay of his successor, the international officials who facilitated the handover of power, and people on the street who want his head.
NEWS
August 7, 2011 | By Sally A. Downey, Inquirer Staff Writer
Mae Goldstein Lutz, 85, of Center City, a former social worker in Philadelphia and press attache in Ethiopia who operated a jewelry store on Rittenhouse Square for more than 15 years, died of lung cancer Tuesday, Aug. 2, at Vitas Hospice at Methodist Hospital. Mrs. Lutz opened Repliqué in a beauty salon in 1977 and soon afterward moved the enterprise to the nearby Warwick Hotel at 17th and Locust Streets. A son, Barry Lutz, said Repliqué specialized in jewelry inspired by Tiffany, Cartier, and Van Cleef & Arpels, but sold at a fraction of the cost.
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