FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
November 15, 2007
JOHN STREET has been invited to teach a Temple political science course at the "nominal salary" of $30,000. That's only some 10 times what an eminently qualified adjunct professor is paid. Perhaps Mr. Street might be induced to donate his token salary to provide hot lunches for underprivileged academics. Harold Gullan Philadelphia A case of a dime dropping Too many people are making a big deal about John Timoney catching Officer Cassidy's killer. They caught him because somebody recognized him and called it in. Timoney didn't use any special supercop techniques.
NEWS
August 5, 2011 | By Robert Moran, Inquirer Staff Writer
An adjunct mathematics professor died Wednesday after he reportedly dived off the second tier of a rotunda to the ground floor of a building at Chestnut Hill College in front of students and staff, a college source said Thursday. A statement on the college's website identified the professor as Rudolf Alexandrov and described his death as the result of a fall, but did not elaborate. Philadelphia police confirmed that there had been a suicide at the college, but declined to release any further information.
NEWS
September 17, 1996 | By Pam Louwagie, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
The Pennsylvania Labor Relations Board will hear a discrimination complaint filed by the adjunct instructors at Bucks County Community College. Adjunct faculty - instructors contracted to teach specific courses - filed an allegation last spring alleging that the college had discriminated against several adjunct faculty who had tried to join a union. The complaint says the individuals either were not hired to teach the spring semester or were assigned classes only days before the spring semester started.
NEWS
November 20, 2009 | By Susan Snyder INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Adjunct instructors, who say they make up nearly half of Temple University's faculty, called for better pay and working conditions yesterday at a demonstration in front of the campus bell tower near Paley Library. The part-time professors, who complain that they don't have their own offices or a clear path for promotion to full-time teacher, have held demonstrations every day this week and plan to be out again today. The group calls the event "adjunct awareness week" - the first of its kind on the Temple campus.
NEWS
March 19, 2016 | By Caroline Wiseblood Meline
Hooray for the St. Joe's men's basketball team for getting into this year's NCAA tournament. It's very exciting, and I hope they win the championship. I mean it. But there is something that gives me pause. In the heart of this supposed bastion of Jesuit integrity lies a worm eating away at its moral fiber. That worm is the university's reliance on a small army of adjuncts to teach a large portion of its courses while refusing to pay these professionals a living wage. I should know.
NEWS
March 1, 1998 | By Todd Bishop, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
In a first-floor office in the Bucks County Community College administration hall, negotiators for the college and its faculty union gathered last week to begin work on a precedent. Discussions began Tuesday afternoon to determine the terms under which part-time campus faculty would be covered under the same contract as their full-time counterparts. Union, college and state officials say the situation represents the first time at a Pennsylvania community college that both types of faculty would belong to the same bargaining unit.
NEWS
April 28, 1998 | By Todd Bishop, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
A contract proposed for part-time teachers at Bucks County Community College would bring hefty increases in county taxes or student tuition, college officials warn. Administrators and trustees, in their third month of negotiations with the college's newly organized adjunct faculty, predict that if the union's current proposal were approved, it would cost $4.1 million next year. If that spending increase were funded through tuition, students would face a 40 percent increase - $345 per semester for a student taking 12 units, administrators said.
NEWS
November 11, 2012
Pennsylvania higher education officials took a contentious pay cut off the table in contract talks with state university faculty Friday, but the union said it intended to press ahead with strike-authorization votes next week. The Association of Pennsylvania State College and University Faculties said the sides remain at odds on issues including compensation for temporary instructors, health-care benefits, and online education. During talks Friday in Harrisburg, negotiators for the State System of Higher Education withdrew a proposal for a 35 percent salary cut for temporary, or adjunct, faculty.
NEWS
April 12, 2001 | By Kaitlin Gurney INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
After five years of double-digit tuition increases, Rowan University officials introduced a 2002 budget yesterday that includes an increase of about 9 percent. The university also expects to raise tuition by 8 percent each of the next two years, president Donald Farish said. In the proposed budget, in-state students would pay $4,500, an increase of $360, and out-of-state students $9,000, an increase of $720. In-state graduate-student tuition would be $7,080, an increase of $576, while tuition for out-of-state graduate students would be $11,328, an increase of $912.
NEWS
March 21, 2011
Three things are clear after a meeting yesterday between Father Jim St. George and officials of from Chestnut Hill College, which had fired the former adjunct professor for being gay. He will not be reinstated at the college, there will be no legal action on his part and both sides agree it?s time to move on. ?I am pleased to announce that I have reached an amicable resolution with Chestnut Hill College that will end this controversy,? St. George said in a statement released after the meeting at the Center City firm of his attorney, George Bochetto.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
March 26, 2016
ISSUE | ST. JOE'S School owes adjuncts nothing Caroline Wiseblood Meline asserts that St. Joseph's University exploits adjunct faculty and therefore is not living up to its Jesuit standards ("Three cheers for St. Joe's, unless you're adjunct," March 18). But the university owes no adjunct more than payment for an agreed-upon service and will never unilaterally deliver benefits and raises. Unless, of course, the adjuncts unionize and collectively assert power at a bargaining table: Power, not sentimentality, advances economic interests.
NEWS
March 19, 2016 | By Caroline Wiseblood Meline
Hooray for the St. Joe's men's basketball team for getting into this year's NCAA tournament. It's very exciting, and I hope they win the championship. I mean it. But there is something that gives me pause. In the heart of this supposed bastion of Jesuit integrity lies a worm eating away at its moral fiber. That worm is the university's reliance on a small army of adjuncts to teach a large portion of its courses while refusing to pay these professionals a living wage. I should know.
NEWS
December 19, 2015 | By Jonathan Lai, Inquirer Staff Writer
A Rutgers University course studying black feminism through the singer Beyoncé was effectively canceled by the department of women's and gender studies, the course's instructor and creator says. The university denied Thursday that the class was ever canceled, saying it was moved to the American studies program. But Kevin Allred, an adjunct at the New Brunswick campus who teaches the course, said he had to ask American studies to offer it after the women's studies department would not schedule it. Allred was finishing teaching two sections of Politicizing Beyoncé this semester, the 10th and 11th times he has taught the class, when he learned it was not listed for the spring semester.
NEWS
November 27, 2015 | By Susan Snyder, Inquirer Staff Writer
Temple University's 1,400 adjunct professors will become part of the faculty union, after more than two-thirds of those voting approved the proposal. The tally - 609-266 - came after years of efforts to unionize the adjunct faculty. The Temple Association of University Professionals will double in size as a result of the vote, whose results were released by both the university and the union. Adjunct faculty become union members immediately but their work terms will have to be negotiated, and the vote has to be officially certified by the Pennsylvania Labor Relations Board, said Art Hochner, president of the union and a professor in the Fox School of Business.
NEWS
October 19, 2015
ISSUE | TEMPLE Let adjuncts decide As a Temple University alumnus and employee for the last 10 years, I am calling on the university to let me and my fellow adjunct professors vote on joining the faculty union without a campaign of false information and intimidation ("Adjunct faculty at Temple win right to hold union election," Philly.com, Sept. 30). The majority of adjunct professors filed for a union election with the Pennsylvania Labor Relations Board in December 2014. We want a union because we deserve fair pay, respect, and a voice in our workplace.
NEWS
December 17, 2013 | By Susan Snyder, Inquirer Staff Writer
Jennie Shanker committed to teaching two classes in sculpture at a Philadelphia college for the spring 2012 semester. She turned down other teaching offers to keep that commitment. One week before the semester began, the college abruptly canceled one of the classes because it was one student shy of its enrollment target. "That was half my income," said Shanker, who earns $3,000 to $5,000 per three-credit course. Such is the plight of an adjunct professor. Adjuncts work without benefits or job security, often for little pay and with no stable career path, though providing a substantial portion of the higher education workforce.
NEWS
September 10, 2013 | By Jonathan Lai, Inquirer Staff Writer
Each fall, a transition almost imperceptible to students occurs at South Jersey community colleges - a handful of the vast adjunct teaching staff begin to stride the halls as full-time faculty. For those promoted, it can be an adjustment both exciting and stressful. "It seems like not only do you have the stuff that technically you're responsible for, but people have far higher expectations now," Joseph D'Argenio, 38, said Friday, the end of his first week as an instructor of history, geography, and political science at Gloucester County College after several years as an adjunct teaching the same subjects.
BUSINESS
November 14, 2012 | By Jane M. Von Bergen, Inquirer Staff Writer
They're not quite a union - not yet, and maybe not ever, but the adjunct faculty at St. Joseph's University are beginning to act like one. They have formed a group, held meetings with the university administration, and managed to win a pay raise along with a handful of professional perks important to academics. "We've made a lot of noise, and we are in the process of making a lot of noise, and I'm making a lot of noise myself," said Caroline Meline, an instructor in the philosophy department who earns $3,780 per three-credit course.
NEWS
November 11, 2012
Pennsylvania higher education officials took a contentious pay cut off the table in contract talks with state university faculty Friday, but the union said it intended to press ahead with strike-authorization votes next week. The Association of Pennsylvania State College and University Faculties said the sides remain at odds on issues including compensation for temporary instructors, health-care benefits, and online education. During talks Friday in Harrisburg, negotiators for the State System of Higher Education withdrew a proposal for a 35 percent salary cut for temporary, or adjunct, faculty.
NEWS
August 5, 2011 | By Robert Moran, Inquirer Staff Writer
An adjunct mathematics professor died Wednesday after he reportedly dived off the second tier of a rotunda to the ground floor of a building at Chestnut Hill College in front of students and staff, a college source said Thursday. A statement on the college's website identified the professor as Rudolf Alexandrov and described his death as the result of a fall, but did not elaborate. Philadelphia police confirmed that there had been a suicide at the college, but declined to release any further information.
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