FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
May 17, 2010
WE ADMIRE Stu Bykofsky for consistently speaking his mind and being willing to go against the grain. But in doing so by taking on critics of Arizona's immigration law he, unfortunately, misses the mark. We agree the federal government has failed and dragged its feet in not passing sorely needed legislation. Also, those who want to bring about more stringent enforcement and regulation of immigration should not be categorically charged with being bigots. But the Arizona statute seduces the state's residents with the false promise of improving safety and security.
NEWS
December 9, 1998 | by Marc Meltzer, Daily News Staff Writer
The Anti-Defamation League of B'Nai B'Rith yesterday demanded that the Carver High School Home and School Association oust Marvin A. Smith as its president. The call came a day after the Philadelphia school board unanimously passed a resolution condemning Smith for writing a letter that "was clearly racist and anti-Semitic. " The letter was sent about a year ago to George Washington Carver High School principal Ella Travis, before Smith became president of the association.
NEWS
November 1, 2002 | By Kristen A. Graham INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
The state chapter of the Anti-Defamation League has weighed in on the township's bitterly contested mayoral race, blasting the Republican candidate for a statement she made about her opponent. The criticism stems from comments by Alene Ammond that compared Bernie Platt to "a Nazi general" in an article in the Courier-Post. In the report, she criticized campaign literature mailed by Cherry Hill Democrats that attacked her record as a state senator in the late 1970s. Platt, a former mayor and Camden County freeholder who is Jewish, has denied responsibility for the mailings.
NEWS
October 8, 1998 | by William Bunch, Daily News Staff Writer
The controversial plan for what's been billed "the black primary" - a vote by Philadelphia NAACP members aimed at winnowing down the field of African-American mayoral candidates in 1999 - was blasted yesterday by a leading anti-discrimination group. The local chapter head of the Anti-Defamation League of B'nai B'rith, or ADL, said in a letter yesterday that the proposed vote by the mostly black civil rights group is "introducing race into the contest for mayor in a way that is unnecessary, divisive and counterproductive.
NEWS
May 14, 2013 | BY REBECCA BORISON, Daily News Staff Writer borisonr@gmail.com
IN OCTOBER 1913, Chicago's monthly B'nai B'rith News announced the formation of a group seeking "to stop, by appeals to reason and conscience, and if necessary, by appeals to law, the defamation of the Jewish people. " The fledgling group, organized the previous month, was named the Anti-Defamation League of America, and its executive committee included five Philadelphia men among 127 members of the Independent Order of B'nai B'rith. The immediate goal was specific: to combat demeaning caricatures of Jews in theater, movies, newspapers, magazines and textbooks.
NEWS
March 24, 1999 | by Myung Oak Kim, Daily News Staff Writer
The number of anti-Semitic incidents in Pennsylvania rose 12 percent between 1997 and 1998, while the number of incidents nationally rose only 2 percent, a new report by the Anti-Defamation League said. But matching the national trend, Pennsylvania saw an increase in acts of vandalism (28 cases compared to 12 in '97) and a drop in harassment incidents, threats and assaults (42 cases compared to 50 in '97), said regional ADL director Barry Morrison. With 70 reported anti-Semitic cases, Pennsylvania ranked sixth among states, behind New York, New Jersey, California, Florida and Massachusetts, according to the ADL's 1998 Audit of Anti-Semitic Incidents.
NEWS
July 1, 2013
"Injustice anywhere is a threat to justice everywhere. " - Martin Luther King Jr. A century ago, the Anti-Defamation League began with a simple but noble mission: "to secure justice and fair treatment to all citizens alike. " It remains the nation's most prominent Jewish civil rights group, fighting discrimination, racism, and anti-Semitism. The ADL was founded in Chicago in 1913 by a group of prominent Jewish leaders who wanted to stop the mistreatment of American Jews at a time when it was shamefully commonplace.
NEWS
January 19, 1990 | By Murray Dubin, Inquirer Staff Writer
Anti-Semitic incidents nationally rose in 1989 to their highest level in the decade - 1,432 - according to an audit conducted by the Anti-Defamation League of B'nai B'rith. The number is nearly 12 percent higher than 1988 and involves 845 incidents of vandalism and desecration and 587 episodes of harassment, assault and threats against Jews and Jewish institutions. The vandalism figure includes arson and bombings. The record number of incidents is "disturbing but not surprising," said Abraham H. Foxman, the ADL's national director.
BUSINESS
April 19, 2012 | Inquirer Staff Report
The Anti-Defamation League in Philadelphia publicly objected Thursday to a T-shirt being sold by Urban Outfitters Inc. that bears a symbol that critics said resembles a Star of David patch that Jews in Nazi Europe were forced to wear during the Holocaust, sometimes on concentration camp uniforms. "We find this use of symbolism to be extremely distasteful and offensive, and we are outraged that your company would make this product available to your customers," Barry Morrison, regional director of the ADL, wrote in a letter e-mailed to Richard A. Hayne, chairman and chief executive of the retail corporation headquartered at the Philadelphia Navy Yard.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
July 1, 2013
"Injustice anywhere is a threat to justice everywhere. " - Martin Luther King Jr. A century ago, the Anti-Defamation League began with a simple but noble mission: "to secure justice and fair treatment to all citizens alike. " It remains the nation's most prominent Jewish civil rights group, fighting discrimination, racism, and anti-Semitism. The ADL was founded in Chicago in 1913 by a group of prominent Jewish leaders who wanted to stop the mistreatment of American Jews at a time when it was shamefully commonplace.
NEWS
July 1, 2013 | By Harold Brubaker, Inquirer Staff Writer
This summer, 21 Catholic school teachers will spend four days at Daylesford Abbey near Paoli, learning about the history of Catholic-Jewish relations and the Holocaust. The program, for middle- and high-school teachers from Pennsylvania, South Jersey, and Delaware, is a partnership of the Archdiocese of Philadelphia and the Anti-Defamation League. Bearing Witness, as the program is called, is one of numerous efforts by the Anti-Defamation League, which is celebrating its 100th anniversary this year, to combat anti-Semitism and to counter hatred, prejudice, and bigotry.
NEWS
May 14, 2013 | BY REBECCA BORISON, Daily News Staff Writer borisonr@gmail.com
IN OCTOBER 1913, Chicago's monthly B'nai B'rith News announced the formation of a group seeking "to stop, by appeals to reason and conscience, and if necessary, by appeals to law, the defamation of the Jewish people. " The fledgling group, organized the previous month, was named the Anti-Defamation League of America, and its executive committee included five Philadelphia men among 127 members of the Independent Order of B'nai B'rith. The immediate goal was specific: to combat demeaning caricatures of Jews in theater, movies, newspapers, magazines and textbooks.
BUSINESS
April 19, 2012 | Inquirer Staff Report
The Anti-Defamation League in Philadelphia publicly objected Thursday to a T-shirt being sold by Urban Outfitters Inc. that bears a symbol that critics said resembles a Star of David patch that Jews in Nazi Europe were forced to wear during the Holocaust, sometimes on concentration camp uniforms. "We find this use of symbolism to be extremely distasteful and offensive, and we are outraged that your company would make this product available to your customers," Barry Morrison, regional director of the ADL, wrote in a letter e-mailed to Richard A. Hayne, chairman and chief executive of the retail corporation headquartered at the Philadelphia Navy Yard.
NEWS
April 1, 2012
Benjamin Weinthal ?is a Berlin-based fellow at the Foundation for Defense of Democracies French authorities brought a recent dramatic standoff with a crazed gunman to an abrupt end when they shot him dead in a house in the southwestern town of Toulouse. Mohammed Merah, a 23-year-old French citizen of Algerian origin, is suspected of killing four Jews outside a school and three soldiers after returning to France from South Asia. Merah's murder spree represents a new European tradition of importing radical Jew-hatred.
NEWS
October 19, 2010 | By QUEEN MUSE, museq@phillynews.com 215-854-5880
Frank Meeink wasn't always a good guy. As a member of an underground Nazi movement dubbed the Strike Force, Meeink said that he "rarely went more than a week without beating on somebody. " Meeink was so proud of his violent acts, he videotaped them. When a video of the skinhead kicking and beating a victim for hours fell into the hands of Illinois authorities, Meeink was arrested and served nearly a year in prison when he was 18. While in prison, he forged a close friendship with two black inmates.
NEWS
August 23, 2010
News Corp. should get out of politics There is something frighteningly apropos about Tony Auth's editorial cartoon Thursday satirizing News Corp.'s $1 million donation to the Republican Governors Association. The lone elephant bathing in cash is an all-too-accurate symbol of this country's dash toward the concentration of obscene wealth in an ever-shrinking portion of the population. More frightening still is the near-fascist domination of our Supreme Court, which recently defied age-old precedent and practice to open the floodgates to such corporate political donations.
NEWS
August 9, 2010 | By MICHAELLERNER
THE ADL publicly opposes the construction two blocks from Ground Zero of Cordoba House, which the planners imagine hosting a range of activities like those offered at the 92nd Street Y, and including a mosque at which Muslims could worship. The plan is opposed by some who have consistently used the attack on the World Trade Center as justification for fear and hatred of Muslims. ADL leader Abe Foxman presented the position of this organization that claims to oppose discrimination by reading a statement that seemed to be a perfect example of "shooting and crying" (first you attack brutally, then you cry about how sad it is to be put into this difficult position, often blaming the victims for having "forced" us to attack them)
NEWS
May 17, 2010
WE ADMIRE Stu Bykofsky for consistently speaking his mind and being willing to go against the grain. But in doing so by taking on critics of Arizona's immigration law he, unfortunately, misses the mark. We agree the federal government has failed and dragged its feet in not passing sorely needed legislation. Also, those who want to bring about more stringent enforcement and regulation of immigration should not be categorically charged with being bigots. But the Arizona statute seduces the state's residents with the false promise of improving safety and security.
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