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Adolescent Pregnancy

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NEWS
September 26, 1993 | By Marie McCullough, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Adolescent pregnancy rates in Philadelphia's Pennsylvania suburbs have been falling for nearly a decade, the Family Planning Council of Southeastern Pennsylvania has found. The trend in Bucks, Montgomery, Chester and Delaware Counties contrasts with city, state and national statistics. It is all the more surprising in light of national and local studies showing that more teenagers are sexually active. "The teen pregnancy problem has been seen by many as intractable," said Dorothy Mann, the executive director of the council, which administers federal funds for family planning services in the region.
NEWS
December 26, 1986
I read with encouragement the Dec. 10 front-page article "Panel backs the pill in teen-pregnancy fight. " The National Academy of Sciences has just made public a comprehensive research study that indicates that adolescent pregnancy is a critical health and social problem in this country and that aggressive public education and greater access to contraceptives are necessary. One can hardly pick up a periodical today that doesn't describe the ill societal effects of teen pregnancy. This problem has injured America and America's youth for too long.
NEWS
April 28, 1998
It's better than a Dumpster. Way better. In fact, the approximately 275 infants and toddlers in Teen Parent Centers in 13 Philadelphia public high schools receive much better care than that provided to many other teen parents' children - who may face futures of poverty, sickness, even abuse. The prospects of the babies at the high schools are enhanced even more, since their mothers are more likely to graduate. As reported yesterday by Daily News education writer Mensah M. Dean, the cost to the School District of Philadelphia for top-of-the-line day care is $11,000 per child - almost $4,000 more than is spent on their teen-age parents.
NEWS
December 15, 1988 | From Inquirer Wire Services
Public schools in New Jersey need to expand the availability of school- based clinics offering information about birth control and abortion if the state is to fight an "epidemic" of teenage pregnancy, a report issued yesterday said. The city of Camden led the state in the number of births by female teenagers ages 15 to 19, with 164.41 births per 1,000 people in that age group two years ago, according to the report. The New Jersey Task Force on Adolescent Pregnancy's report said school- based intervention is crucial to preventing sexually active teenagers from becoming mothers before they are ready.
NEWS
February 29, 2004
Teen pregnancies Re: "Just saying no to pregnancy," Feb. 23: While rates of adolescent pregnancy have decreased over the last 10 years, it is still a problem in need of attention. Many of these births are unwanted and a result of involuntary sexual relations, and these births often catapult young women and their babies into poor economic conditions. The research does not support the efficacy of abstinence-only-until-marriage programs on behavior such as having sex, using contraceptives, getting pregnant or having a child.
NEWS
February 19, 1987
As a member of the Panel on Adolescent Pregnancy and Childbearing for the National Academy of Sciences, I applaud the report on teen pregnancy recently issued by state Rep. Robert O'Donnell (D., Phila.) and the members of the Select Committee on Teen Pregnancy. This report is both timely and necessary. The costs of teen pregnancy have been mounting in recent years: high rates of abortion, infant mortality, high school dropout, public assistance, and increased medical costs. This report provides a plan for Pennsylvania to develop innovative and meaningful programs to prevent teen pregnancy and assist teen parents.
NEWS
December 7, 1988 | By Robin Palley, Daily News Staff Writer
A pregnant teen-ager here faces tough odds in taking advantage of the support services set up to help her. For the father of her child, it is even harder. So says a Temple University researcher who has just completed a study of services in Pennsylvania for teen-age parents - and found them fragmented and inadequate. Services after the birth are particularly lacking, the study found. Dr. Lulu Mae Nix, director of Temple University's National Institute of Adolescent Pregnancy and Family Services, directed the survey on behalf of a statewide committee on teen pregnancy.
NEWS
August 24, 1995
Condoms and counseling have not turned 10 Philadelphia high schools into red light districts. Or nunneries, either. Four years ago, the school board decided to allow health resource centers, staffed by professionals from outside the schools, to give out condoms - but only after teens were counseled about the benefits of abstinence. Studies show that, in high schools with centers that give out condoms, students are having sex at exactly the same rate as those in high schools without access to condoms.
NEWS
April 23, 2002 | By Theodore Johnson
As a society, we are conflicted when it comes to sexuality. We are bombarded with hypersexualized images and messages, yet we are unable to talk with our children about sex. How does this lack of communication affect our children? Every year, nearly one million teenagers become pregnant and 3.7 million cases of sexually transmitted infections are diagnosed in American teens. The goal of National Teen Pregnancy Prevention Month, which will be observed next month, is to help young people make responsible choices about their sexual health and to empower them to advocate for themselves and their peers in preventing teen pregnancy in their schools and communities.
NEWS
August 16, 1996 | By Michael Reisch
Spurred on by the political frenzy of an election year, the government is about to embark on a dangerous policy course that, under the guise of "welfare reform," will impoverish more than a million children, and cause millions of already poor children and their families to fall deeper into poverty. The termination of the 60-year-old federal guarantee of cash assistance for poor children and their caretakers signifies a retreat from our long-standing recognition that only the national government has the means to adequately address the economic needs of low-income individuals and families.
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NEWS
February 29, 2004
Teen pregnancies Re: "Just saying no to pregnancy," Feb. 23: While rates of adolescent pregnancy have decreased over the last 10 years, it is still a problem in need of attention. Many of these births are unwanted and a result of involuntary sexual relations, and these births often catapult young women and their babies into poor economic conditions. The research does not support the efficacy of abstinence-only-until-marriage programs on behavior such as having sex, using contraceptives, getting pregnant or having a child.
NEWS
April 23, 2002 | By Theodore Johnson
As a society, we are conflicted when it comes to sexuality. We are bombarded with hypersexualized images and messages, yet we are unable to talk with our children about sex. How does this lack of communication affect our children? Every year, nearly one million teenagers become pregnant and 3.7 million cases of sexually transmitted infections are diagnosed in American teens. The goal of National Teen Pregnancy Prevention Month, which will be observed next month, is to help young people make responsible choices about their sexual health and to empower them to advocate for themselves and their peers in preventing teen pregnancy in their schools and communities.
NEWS
April 28, 1998
It's better than a Dumpster. Way better. In fact, the approximately 275 infants and toddlers in Teen Parent Centers in 13 Philadelphia public high schools receive much better care than that provided to many other teen parents' children - who may face futures of poverty, sickness, even abuse. The prospects of the babies at the high schools are enhanced even more, since their mothers are more likely to graduate. As reported yesterday by Daily News education writer Mensah M. Dean, the cost to the School District of Philadelphia for top-of-the-line day care is $11,000 per child - almost $4,000 more than is spent on their teen-age parents.
NEWS
November 24, 1996 | By Murray Dubin, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Why didn't they talk to someone? Why didn't they get help? How could it all have ended so tragically with a dead infant in a trash bin outside a Newark, Del., motel? Having a child out of wedlock is not the end of the world, especially for two well-educated, well-to-do, 18-year-old college freshmen. Or is it? The Nov. 12 death of baby boy Peterson, the newborn son of Brian C. Peterson Jr. and Amy S. Grossberg, has the nation collectively shaking its head and wondering.
NEWS
August 16, 1996 | By Michael Reisch
Spurred on by the political frenzy of an election year, the government is about to embark on a dangerous policy course that, under the guise of "welfare reform," will impoverish more than a million children, and cause millions of already poor children and their families to fall deeper into poverty. The termination of the 60-year-old federal guarantee of cash assistance for poor children and their caretakers signifies a retreat from our long-standing recognition that only the national government has the means to adequately address the economic needs of low-income individuals and families.
NEWS
August 24, 1995
Condoms and counseling have not turned 10 Philadelphia high schools into red light districts. Or nunneries, either. Four years ago, the school board decided to allow health resource centers, staffed by professionals from outside the schools, to give out condoms - but only after teens were counseled about the benefits of abstinence. Studies show that, in high schools with centers that give out condoms, students are having sex at exactly the same rate as those in high schools without access to condoms.
NEWS
September 26, 1993 | By Marie McCullough, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Adolescent pregnancy rates in Philadelphia's Pennsylvania suburbs have been falling for nearly a decade, the Family Planning Council of Southeastern Pennsylvania has found. The trend in Bucks, Montgomery, Chester and Delaware Counties contrasts with city, state and national statistics. It is all the more surprising in light of national and local studies showing that more teenagers are sexually active. "The teen pregnancy problem has been seen by many as intractable," said Dorothy Mann, the executive director of the council, which administers federal funds for family planning services in the region.
NEWS
April 19, 1989 | By Carol Towarnicky, Daily News Columnist
What do you think is important to being a parent? In the course of a rainy Monday morning, Rhonda Silverman will ask this question of three different classes at Strawberry Mansion Junior High School. The first, most obvious answer from the students is always the same: Money. "Having money?" asks Silverman, the adolescent outreach counselor/ educator at the Medical College of Pennsylvania (MCP). "Why do you have to have money to be a good parent?" "To buy clothes," says one young man. "Yeah, you want to spoil your kids," adds another.
NEWS
December 21, 1988 | By Carol D. Leonnig, Special to The Inquirer
Local teen-pregnancy counselors and maternity health officials agree that New Jersey Health Commissioner Molly Coye's push for school-based birth- control clinics will not solve what she calls the "epidemic" of teenage pregnancies, but they disagree when it comes to choosing another remedy. Health-care workers in Burlington County - from school nurses to the directors of programs for pregnant teens - responded to Coye's recommendation last week that the state's school districts should offer on-site birth-control clinics to keep the numbers of teenage pregnancies in check.
NEWS
December 15, 1988 | From Inquirer Wire Services
Public schools in New Jersey need to expand the availability of school- based clinics offering information about birth control and abortion if the state is to fight an "epidemic" of teenage pregnancy, a report issued yesterday said. The city of Camden led the state in the number of births by female teenagers ages 15 to 19, with 164.41 births per 1,000 people in that age group two years ago, according to the report. The New Jersey Task Force on Adolescent Pregnancy's report said school- based intervention is crucial to preventing sexually active teenagers from becoming mothers before they are ready.
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