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Adoption

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NEWS
June 30, 2016 | By Andee Hochman
THE PARENTS: Brigit Barry, 30, and Michael Cottone, 33, of Broomall THE CHILD: Vincent (Vin) Kai Barry-Cottone, adopted April 27, 2016 WHO PROPOSED TO WHOM: After three years of dating, Brigit said, "Let's go to the ring store. " The new house, the one on which they'd just closed, reeked of smoke. Water pooled in the basement. Firefighters had punched holes in the back in order to fight a smoldering blaze that began when a faulty heat lamp in the bathroom ignited fibers from stripped wallpaper.
NEWS
February 18, 2003 | By Marie McCullough INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Listen to Jacque Kenney Guinan's story of how she reluctantly gave up her son 34 years ago, and it is easy to understand why she battled depression for decades, and why she is no fan of adoption. The petite, soft-spoken 52-year-old was middle-class, unmarried, and pregnant at age 17 in 1969. Like hundreds of thousands of other young women of that time, she disappeared into a "home for unwed mothers" to bear - and then lose - her child. In the three decades between the end of World War II and the legalizing of abortion in 1973, adoption flourished in America as never before, or since.
NEWS
October 1, 2000
Tell us about your family's experiences with adoption. What factors went into the decision? What did you do to prepare? Were you ready when it happened? How did you find out about your own adoption? What advice would you give to other families considering adoption? Send essays of 200 to 300 words by Oct. 16 to Voices/Adoption, The Inquirer, Box 41705, Philadelphia, Pa. 19101. Send e-mail to inquirer.letters@phillynews.com or faxes to 215-854-4483. Questions? Call Kevin Ferris, readers' editor, at 215-854-4543.
NEWS
February 18, 1990 | By Fawn Vrazo, Inquirer Staff Writer
Adoption magazine, a new self-help publication aimed specifically at people seeking to adopt, is postponing its second issue until the beleaguered publishers redesign its format. Magazine co-founder Terry Ulick said last week that Adoption had experienced a problem that other publications might welcome. There was so much publicity surrounding the release of the first bi-monthly issue in November, Ulick said, that an initial printing of 50,000 copies sold out on many newsstands.
NEWS
February 19, 1987
I have followed every detail of Mary Beth Whitehead's ordeal with great sympathy as a new mother of a 9-month-old. But please, legislators, the resolution of this case must not be the end of the story. We must have laws to be sure a surrogate arrangement does not end in tragedy. At the very least, a surrogate mother should have the same right to change her mind as a mother considering adoption has. I do not believe anyone can decide absolutely, in advance of a birth, to give the child away.
NEWS
December 20, 2005 | By CAROL WINTER & WINSTON GRIZZARD
IN EARLY August, my wife called me at work; she was crying. My chest tightened as I feared someone in the family was hurt. She composed herself and exclaimed, "They gave AbuBakarr a visa. " AbuBakarr is our adopted 8-year-old son, a war orphan from Sierra Leone. We had been waiting for a year and a half to bring him to the U.S. after we had completed the home study, law-enforcement clearance and gained INS approval, which added another year. (The Daily News had reported our difficulties in a piece by John Baer on Aug. 1.)
NEWS
October 22, 1987 | By Lini S. Kadaba, Inquirer Staff Writer
Deborah Heart and Lung Center in Browns Mills, N.J., "adopted" Philadelphia's School District 8 last week in a business-education alliance formalized in ceremonies at Northeast High School at Cottman and Algon Avenues. In most such adoptions, the business forms an alliance with a single school. Ruth Ingebretsen, director of the Pennsylvania Region for Deborah, said in a telephone interview that the hospital was large enough to take on a number of schools. The adoption will provide District 8's schools with a variety of health- oriented programs, Ingebretsen said.
NEWS
August 4, 1991 | By Lynn Hamilton, Special to The Inquirer
In 1982, Carol Hallenbeck of Wayne spent about $6,000 to launch a publishing company, Our Child Press, specializing in adoption-related publications. Hallenbeck, a former community-health nurse who taught childbirth classes, used that money to produce 500 copies of her book, Our Child: Preparation for Parenting in Adoption - Instructor's Guide. It's for teaching infant-care classes to parents waiting to adopt children. "It's a very limited market, so I didn't even try to have someone else publish it," said Hallenbeck, 42, during a recent interview in her Wayne home, which also serves as her office.
NEWS
April 17, 1995 | by Yvonne Dennis, Daily News Staff Writer
GIVING AWAY SIMONE: A MEMOIR Jan L. Waldron Times Books / $22 While Jessica Lange and Halle Berry personify on the big screen the pain between mothers in a tug-of-war adoption, a real-life drama goes deeper into the effects on a family living a pattern of abandonment. The movie "Losing Isaiah" pits a successful white professional against a black former drug addict in a custody battle fought with lioness ferocity. In a contrast better than fiction, "Giving Away Simone," a memoir by free-lance writer Jan Waldron, paints a sad portrait of five generations of mothers giving up their daughters with an almost uncaring sense of defeat.
NEWS
February 11, 2013 | By Jim Heintz, Associated Press
MOSCOW - After weeks of anxiety plodding through the opaque Russian legal system, two U.S. women have custody of their adopted Russian children and are preparing to take them home to start a new life together. Jeana Bonner of South Jordan, Utah, and Rebecca Preece of Nampa, Idaho, told the Associated Press on Saturday about the expenses, the confusion, and emotional swings they have gone through since arriving in Moscow in mid-January, expecting to quickly leave with their children, both of whom have Down syndrome.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
June 30, 2016 | By Andee Hochman
THE PARENTS: Brigit Barry, 30, and Michael Cottone, 33, of Broomall THE CHILD: Vincent (Vin) Kai Barry-Cottone, adopted April 27, 2016 WHO PROPOSED TO WHOM: After three years of dating, Brigit said, "Let's go to the ring store. " The new house, the one on which they'd just closed, reeked of smoke. Water pooled in the basement. Firefighters had punched holes in the back in order to fight a smoldering blaze that began when a faulty heat lamp in the bathroom ignited fibers from stripped wallpaper.
NEWS
June 18, 2016 | By Mari A. Schaefer, STAFF WRITER
Still looking for a Father's Day gift? The Animal Care & Control Team of Philadelphia (ACCT) is waiving all adoption fees this weekend. The "Who's Your Daddy?" promotion for all pets will run this weekend from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. at 111 W. Hunting Park Ave, in North Philadelphia. "Summer is an extremely busy time of year for us," Vincent Medley, ACCT Philly executive director, said in a statement. "This event makes it fun and stress-free to come find a new best friend. " The regular screening procedures that include "meet and greets" with children and and other pets in the prospective household will apply, according to the shelter.
NEWS
June 3, 2016 | By Emma Platoff, Staff Writer
After a journey of 7,000 miles, Joey, Liberty, and Tisha are looking for new homes in South Jersey. The three dogs, all females, were taken in late April from a dog meat farm in Wonju, South Korea, as part of a broader effort by the Humane Society International to shut down such farms in that country. They arrived in Camden County about two weeks ago and are available for adoption at the Camden County Animal Shelter in Gloucester Township. The Humane Society delivered 171 Korean dogs to U.S. shelters, including St. Hubert's Animal Welfare Center in Madison, N.J., where Joey, a golden retriever; Liberty, a Siberian husky; and Tisha, a Tosa Inu, first traveled.
NEWS
May 23, 2016 | By Julie Shaw, Staff Writer
When former Daily Show host Jon Stewart and his wife, Tracey, agreed to adopt Lily - the horse possibly shot more than 100 times with paintballs and dumped at a Lancaster County sale stable earlier this year - someone must have been looking down from above, the director of the rescue group that has taken care of the mare said Saturday. "It's an incredible gift," said Kelly Smith, of the Omega Horse Rescue & Rehabilitation Center in York County. "Certainly, I don't think we could have planned this or imagined this," Smith said.
NEWS
May 13, 2016
DEAR ABBY: We have a child who was adopted through a closed adoption. We met the birth parents briefly at the hospital, but they wanted no further contact. Both birth parents had issues with drug abuse, and our daughter was born with drug issues, too. A few years later, we were contacted via the adoption agency by the paternal birth grandparents. They requested some photos because the birth father was getting out of jail, and they thought the photos would help keep him out of trouble.
NEWS
May 9, 2016
On April 27, the National Adoption Center hosted its Celebration of Family at the Crystal Tea Room, honoring those who have supported the organization's mission of expanding adoption for children living in foster care. The evening included dinner, cocktails, and a silent auction. The Stan Hochman Compassion for Kids Award was presented to the Codkind family - Melissa, Mitch, Rachel, and Ryan - for their dedication to enhancing the lives of children. The award is named after the former Philadelphia Daily News sports columnist, who died last year and was a longtime adoption supporter.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 5, 2016 | Anndee Hochman, For The Inquirer
That proverbial village - you know, the one everyone says is essential to raise a child - might be the other sling-wearing, Bugaboo-pushing mommies on your block. Or it might be the whole world. Two new books by Philly-connected authors - albeit in very different ways - upend the notion that parenting is meant to be a solo gig. The Mommy Group: Freaking Out, Finding Friends, and Surviving the Happiest Time of Our Lives by Elizabeth Isadora Gold follows a group of women in a flush section of Brooklyn who weather miscarriages, births, sleep training, and the sea change that motherhood brings to one's sense of self.
NEWS
March 26, 2016 | By Martha Woodall, Staff Writer
The Philadelphia School Reform Commission on Thursday approved the broad outlines of a proposed $2.8 billion budget for next year that, while anticipating it will have to pay more for charters and pensions, does not see the district's having to ask City Council for new revenue. In a briefing before the SRC meeting, Superintendent William R. Hite Jr. said the district would ask Harrisburg for more money in the fiscal year that begins July 1, but for the first time in years the city will not be tapped for more.
NEWS
March 24, 2016
WHAT WOULD happen if your wages rose 2 percent a year, while your expenses increased by 4 to 5 percent? No need to get out your calculator. Common sense tells you that eventually you would sink into debt. There might be temporary steps you could make - say, emptying your savings account - but once that money is spent, it is gone. The reality is that sooner or later, without increasing your income or cutting spending, you will be in serious financial difficulty. In Pennsylvania, sooner is about to meet later.
NEWS
March 14, 2016 | By Dan Geringer, Staff Writer
When Farrah, a German shepherd stray, came to Francisvale Home for Smaller Animals in 2012 with a tumor on her right eye, she refused to live anywhere in the no-kill shelter except its bustling kitchen. There, she fell in love with everyone but went ballistic every day when staffers prepared to feed Francisvale's 65 cats. The sounds of kibble being poured into metal bowls sent Farrah into a frenzy of jumping, barking, spinning in circles, and biting her tail. Bright sunlight streaming through a kitchen window and the moving shadow of a ceiling fan were equally powerful triggers.
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