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Adoptive Parents

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NEWS
May 21, 1989 | By Christine Hausman, Special to The Inquirer
Couples who adopt children often look forward to the parenting job that lies ahead, but sometimes their hopes are dashed when problems arise. That's what Dr. Michael D. McGuire told an audience of about 50 doctors and counselors during his lecture on the topic Tuesday night at Northwestern Institute. Prospective parents should demand to know the history of a child they are considering adopting, said McGuire, medical director of the adopted adolescent program at the 142-bed private psychiatric hospital in Fort Washington.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 12, 2011
ANOTHER DAY, another set of people who aren't so gleeful about Fox's "Glee. " Not surprisingly, perhaps, this one consists of adoptive parents who don't think the Ryan Murphy show is reflecting their reality in a story line in which Quinn (Dianna Agron), having given up her baby for adoption, is now vowing to get the child back. They're also not too pleased with how the show's treating the uneasy reunion of Rachel (Lea Michele) with her birth mother (who's played by Idina Menzel, whose character, conveniently, also happens to be the woman who adopted Quinn's baby)
NEWS
June 20, 1991 | By Ovetta Wiggins, Special to The Inquirer
Natalie Gabrielle Fletcher sat on her dad's lap smiling. Then, like most 6- month-old babies, she became a little fidgety. Mark Fletcher quickly walked across the room and placed Natalie in her mother's arms. Her big, brown eyes lit up and her smile returned. Kathleen Fletcher couldn't help but smile as she rocked her baby in the wooden chair in her Victorian-style home in Edgewater Park last week. She knew, and Natalie seemed to know, that everything was fine now. But for a long time, that wasn't the case at all. It took a long time - five years and two months - to create a sense of family in the Fletcher home.
NEWS
November 15, 1990 | By Kathy Boccella, Inquirer Staff Writer
Howard Winkler rarely smiled. It was one of the first things his adoptive parents, Robert and Phyllis Winkler, noticed when they brought the frail, 5-year-old boy home from the adoption agency in 1978. As he got older, Howard began to act increasingly troubled. In 1987, he threatened to kill himself by standing in front of a train. The same year he broke into a neighbor's house armed with a gun and knife and attempted to assault a woman. In 1989 he exposed himself to an 11-year-old girl, an offense for which he has served nearly a year in a youth detention center.
NEWS
March 12, 1986 | By Mike Franolich, Special to The Inquirer
On Friday, a blustery, wintery day, many of the pupils at the Elizabeth Haddon School in Haddonfield whiled away their lunch recesses playing kickball and tag. Others, though, were thinking about other things, such as whales and which one - Arrow, Silver or Digit - their school would vote to adopt. Inside the building, teachers and administrators also were discussing whales, guessing at the results of weeklong balloting by pupils to select one of the whales. Before the voting started, the children had learned something about the contestants from fliers circulated in the school by Madeleine Salmon, chairwoman of the school's Cultural Enrichment Society.
NEWS
June 20, 2002 | By Eils Lotozo INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
In a playpen in the living room, the 10-month-old girl gleefully punched at the buttons of a toy that made animal sounds, as her parents looked on delightedly. Kelly Marie Christian had finally come home. For Jef and Eileen Christian it was the happy ending to an emotional saga that began in October, when the Downingtown couple received a Cambodian adoption decree for the baby. Instead of then traveling to Cambodia to get her, they found themselves among 400 American families stuck in legal limbo last fall when the Immigration and Naturalization Service suspended Cambodian adoptions over allegations of baby trafficking.
NEWS
April 27, 2006 | By Kathleen Brady Shea and Lini S. Kadaba INQUIRER STAFF WRITERS
Kevin is thriving. That is the first message the adoptive parents thrust into an emotional, racially charged custody dispute want everyone to know. "He's healthy, and he's happy," said Lisa Blanton, 40, of Hershey, a day after a judge rejected the bid of a white foster family to adopt the almost 4-year-old black boy, allowing the African American couple to adopt him instead. In an exclusive phone interview yesterday, Lisa Blanton and her husband Martin, 42, downplayed the role of race in their selection as adoptive parents.
NEWS
December 14, 2005 | By Jeff Gammage INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
One of the things that's changed about adoption is that it has developed its own affirming, positive vocabulary. No longer are children to be described as given up, surrendered or placed. The new, progressive parlance is to say that the people who gave birth to them "made an adoption plan. " But that language hardly applies to children like mine, who were born in China. My eldest, now 5, was found alone in an alley when she was three days old. My youngest was discovered outside the door of a health clinic.
NEWS
July 31, 1993 | By ELLEN GOODMAN
It's just about over now. The legal moving papers are all in order. The change of parental address has been finally determined. The last ditch effort to stop the process that will turn Jessica DeBoers into Anna Schmidt failed last Monday when Justice John Paul Stevens denied the emergency request. All that's left now is the packing. By Aug. 2, a 2-year-old girl will be transferred from her adoptive family to her biological family, from the people who raised her to the people who conceived her, from those she loves to those she doesn't even know.
NEWS
December 14, 1987 | By Suzanne Gordon and Mike Franolich, Special to The Inquirer
A 13-month-old boy who was taken at gunpoint from his California home on Friday was reunited with his adoptive parents yesterday, less than 12 hours after his biological parents were arrested for allegedly arranging the kidnapping. Brian Smith, a blond, blue-eyed toddler who has been the center of a custody battle, was returned unharmed to his adoptive parents last night in Newark, N.J., after a cross-country kidnapping that began outside Los Angeles and ended when he was found in a Moorestown apartment.
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ENTERTAINMENT
June 14, 2016 | By Patricia Mans, For The Inquirer
Joseph is a lovable 7-year-old who enjoys being cuddled, spoken to, sung to, and held. He responds well to musical toys and contrasting colors. Joseph benefits from being with other children. He does not get upset easily, but when he does, he can quickly be calmed or redirected. Joseph is slowly learning to speak. Nonambulatory, Joseph requires the assistance of his wheelchair, leg braces, hand splints, and body jacket to help him maintain his posture and standing abilities. Although his main source of nutrition is through a tube, he does receive some oral feeding, as well.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 8, 2015 | By Patricia Mans, For The Inquirer
Despite his many physical challenges, Darnell is a happy 13-year-old. He enjoys being surrounded by people, and when someone says his name, he responds with a smile. Although he is unable to see the television screen, he likes listening to cartoons, and delights in singing and being sung to. When in his recreational swing, he smiles often and makes cooing sounds. Darnell receives physical, occupational, and speech therapy in his specialized school setting. He has a feeding tube and a tracheotomy tube, and will need lifelong care.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 18, 2015 | By Patricia Mans, For The Inquirer
Joseph is a lovable 6-year-old who enjoys being cuddled, spoken to, sung to, and held. He responds well to musical toys and contrasting colors. Joseph benefits from being with other children. He does not get upset easily, but when he does he can quickly be calmed or redirected. Joseph is slowly learning to speak. Non-ambulatory, Joseph requires the assistance of his wheelchair, leg braces, hand splints, and body jacket to help him maintain his posture and standing ability. Although his main source of nutrition is through a tube, he does receive some oral feeding, as well.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 21, 2015 | By Patricia Mans, For The Inquirer
Suzie likes to have her long hair styled into Pippi Longstocking-style pigtail braids. But if someone is reading to her, she'd much rather hear a Dr. Seuss story than one about the spunky redhead. A petite, fun-loving 13-year-old with big blue eyes and long eyelashes, she points to her favorite pictures and tries to verbalize the words. Classified as multiply disabled, Suzie attends a specialized school, where she receives services to meet her physical, behavioral, therapeutic, and educational needs.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 19, 2015 | By Anndee Hochman, For The Inquirer
You can parse a pregnancy into trimesters, divide labor into stages. You can figure that after nine months of gestation, give or take a few days, you will hold a squirming infant in your arms. But adoption, Rachel says, meant a journey with no timetable. Neither she nor Rob felt attached to the idea of a biological child; in fact, Rachel and a friend had always half-joked that if they reached age 35 and didn't have kids, they'd just adopt. "But I did have a vision of how the process [of parenthood]
NEWS
May 29, 2014 | By Suzette Parmley, Inquirer Staff Writer
TRENTON - Gov. Christie signed the New Jersey Adoptees' Birthright Bill into law Tuesday in front of several adoptees and their families and other advocates who had championed the measure for more than three decades. The new law allows adoptees 18 and older to access their original birth certificates without court intervention and makes New Jersey the 10th state since 1995 to unseal adoptee records. Colorado's governor signed that state's bill into law Thursday, while Pennsylvania is reviewing a similar adoptee-access measure.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 22, 2014 | By Patricia Mans, For The Inquirer
At 18, Douglas is handsome, athletic, and passionate about sports. He plays on his school's football and basketball teams, and he hopes to be a professional hoops star one day. He also enjoys softball and soccer and has participated in seasonal leagues in both sports. But his interests do not end there. He also likes stand-up comedy. "I laugh when something is funny," he says. Enrolled in 12th grade, Douglas receives special education services and benefits from the small class size and individual attention.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 11, 2014 | By Patricia Mans, For The Inquirer
Mason, who will celebrate his second birthday next month, is an appealing toddler. His social worker describes him as pleasant and happy. Born prematurely, he is considered medically fragile. Although Mason is nonverbal, he is making some progress through speech therapy. He also benefits from occupational, physical, and feeding therapies, and his skills and abilities are improving daily. He is able to make eye contact, respond to sounds, and coo and babble. Mason is in a foster placement, where he receives all the care he requires.
NEWS
June 27, 2013 | By Jesse J. Holland, Associated Press
WASHINGTON - A divided Supreme Court ruled Tuesday that federal law does not require that a Native American girl be given back to her biological father but also does not clear her adoptive parents to immediately regain custody of the now 3-year-old child. In a resolution that one justice said could compound "the anguish this case has caused," justices voted 5-4 to send the case back to South Carolina to decide the final home for an adopted girl named Veronica. South Carolina courts originally said the 1978 Indian Child Welfare Act - a federal law intended to keep Indian children from being taken from their homes and typically placed with non-Indian adoptive or foster parents - favored her living with her biological father, who took custody of her in 2011.
NEWS
March 28, 2013 | By Robert Moran, Inquirer Staff Writer
Sam Salotti, 19, woke up Tuesday to a Facebook message from a woman who said she was an editor with Russia's state-run Channel One. The channel was planning a show about Salotti's adoptive brother, Josh, 18, who returned to Russia late last year after a tumultuous stay with the Collegeville couple who adopted the pair six years ago. Josh Salotti, now going by the name Alexander Abnosov, sparked an uproar in Russia by accusing his and Sam's adoptive...
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