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Adult Onset Diabetes

NEWS
January 18, 2001 | By Faye Flam, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Adult-onset diabetes has risen to an epidemic 14.4 million cases in this country, and while scientists know this rise parallels the expanding waistlines of Americans, they could not figure out how carrying extra fat triggered the disease. Now, scientists at the University of Pennsylvania say they have discovered a hormone, resistin, which is released by fat cells and appears to bring on adult-onset, or type II, diabetes, which can lead to kidney failure, heart failure, nerve damage, blindness, and amputation of limbs.
NEWS
August 12, 2002 | By Marian Uhlman INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
America has been batting 2 for 3 when it comes to diagnosing people with diabetes. While that would be a remarkable average in baseball, it's not a great statistic for the disease. It translates to nearly six million people with diabetes who do not know they have it. The size of the crowd that needs cluing in grew by roughly 16 million this year to include adults with something called "pre-diabetes. " The new term describes a condition in which sugar levels in the blood are higher than normal but have not yet reached diabetic levels.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 17, 1990 | By Andy Wickstrom, Special to The Inquirer
No one is going to pop Diabetes: A Positive Approach (30 minutes, $19.95) into the VCR and expect a million laughs. But this educational program about living with a permanent medical disorder is the zippiest health video I've seen. The producers have kept the entertainment value high by sacrificing the clinical side, but in this case the decision is defensible because the tape is designed to make one point: A person with diabetes can lead a full, active and rewarding life. It's a point made with great humor by Tom Parks, who wrote and stars in Diabetes.
LIVING
April 28, 1997 | By Marie McCullough, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Health insurance pays for the daily doses of insulin that keep 9-year-old Alicia Ertle's diabetes under control. But it doesn't pay for syringes to inject the insulin, or equipment to monitor her blood sugar, or even for the emergency medication she keeps with her in case she suffers a life-threatening plunge in blood sugar. "It doesn't make sense to me," said Alicia's mother, Carolyn, from their home in Easton. "It costs us about $135 a month out-of-pocket. We're among the lucky ones because we can afford it, but there are a lot of people who have a choice between buying food or medical supplies.
NEWS
June 9, 2012 | By Marie McCullough and INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
What used to be called "adult-onset diabetes" — a leading cause of kidney failure, limb amputations, blindness, heart disease, and stroke among adults — is now a growing problem for American children, too. This health challenge, and how to deal with it, will be one of the hottest topics at this weekend's American Diabetes Association conference. An expected 16,000 health professionals, researchers, advocates, and vendors from around the world are gathering at the Convention Center to share the latest in diabetes research.
NEWS
August 9, 2001 | By Marian Uhlman INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Moderate exercise - such as walking 30 minutes a day - and changes in diet can dramatically reduce the chance of getting diabetes for those most at risk, a groundbreaking nationwide study reported yesterday. The simple prescription offers a powerful antidote against the dramatic rise in Type 2 diabetes in the United States. The study is the first major trial indicating that lifestyle changes can postpone Type 2 diabetes in a diverse American population of overweight people who are at high risk.
NEWS
December 3, 1997 | By Shankar Vedantam, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Diabetics taking a new medicine whose sales were suspended Monday in Britain because of safety concerns should not stop taking it, doctors and researchers said. Rezulin has been thoroughly tested, they say, and its benefits outweigh side effects. "I personally don't think it is cause for alarm," said Mayer B. Davidson, president of the American Diabetes Association, and a Los Angeles doctor. "It's been known since the clinical studies that 2 percent of patients had these increases in liver enzymes.
NEWS
March 5, 1990 | Marc Schogol from reports from Inquirer wire services
INFANT MONITORS Watch out, parents - those infant monitors that let you listen to your kids from across the house may be broadcasting your most private affairs throughout the neighborhood. Radio-scanner enthusiasts with reasonably good roof antennas can pick up the signals up to half a mile away. And Monitoring Times, a magazine for scanner buffs, recently published the monitors' frequencies. DIET TIPS If you have an overactive sweet tooth, keep up your intake of chromium.
NEWS
July 12, 1989 | Marc Schogol and including reports from Inquirer wire services
GHOSTBUSTED. Hardee's restaurants will refit tiny "Ghostblasters" toys in the wake of numerous reports of children swallowing the batteries. About 2 million of the cigarette lighter-size, noise-generating toys, tied in with the movie Ghostbusters II, have been sold at $1.79. Two million more still unsold will be refitted by hand. Health experts urge parents to get immediate medical help for any child swallowing a battery. INSULIN AND DIET. A spaghetti dinner followed by a hot fudge sundae and washed down with a sugary soft drink could send insulin levels soaring, but a glass of beer or wine may bring things back in line.
NEWS
June 4, 2007
The best parties happen with plenty of planning. The National Park Service turns 100 in 2016, and the Department of Interior wants to spruce up its neglected 391 parks for a memorable birthday bash. After holding 40 "listening sessions" from Florida to Alaska and collecting 6,000 comments by mail and online, the agency has created a solid blueprint for stewardship, environmental leadership, recreation, education and staff development for its second 100 years. Interior Secretary Dirk Kempthorne is wisely trying to use the centennial to continue a welcome trend of healthier Park Service budgets.
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