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Adulthood

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ENTERTAINMENT
October 8, 2010 | By Carrie Rickey, Inquirer Movie Critic
A glop of rom-com pabulum, Life as We Know It stars Katherine Heigl as Holly, tightly wound Atlanta chef, and Josh Duhamel as Messer, loosey-goosey sports producer. Fixed up by their respective best friends, they abort their blind date three minutes in. Three years later, when they are named foster parents to Sophie, said friends' orphaned infant, Holly and Messer take baby steps toward adulthood. With pratfalls and teardrops, the film swings from sitcom to sit-dram.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 4, 2010 | By Steven Rea, Inquirer Movie Critic
Not a great place to grow up, the Strobbe house: a cramped, ramshackle place with the toilet out back, a drunken father and three drunken uncles, their kindly but ineffectual mother pottering around, and Gunther - the protagonist of this very fine film from Holland - trying to focus on his schoolwork while mopping up the vomit and dodging the brawls. The Misfortunates , a beautifully shot adaptation of a semiautobiographical novel by Dimitri Verhulst, toggles between black and white and color, between Gunther's stormy adolescence, with its boozings and beatings, and his adulthood, when he's an aspiring novelist (he has the rejection letters to prove it)
NEWS
June 20, 1995 | by Theresa Conroy, Daily News Staff Writer
Please, please, don't make Deniece Rivera wear one of those poufy white dresses. Not one of those, you know, million-tiered, lacy fluffy numbers all covered with bows and ribbons. Puhleeze, no, she begs her mother. "I don't want to wear a big dress!" Deniece Rivera's parents, Rebecca and Julio Rivera, are willing to make that concession (and a few others) because they're trying to combine two cultures: Their Puerto Rican ancestry and their daily North American lives - into a celebration to mark their daughter's journey from young girl to woman.
LIVING
October 4, 1999 | By Susan FitzGerald, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
When Michael Gurian talks about "our boys," he's not referring to his boys. He's talking about all our boys - as in society's boys. He's worried about them. "Our boys are morally adrift," says Gurian, a family therapist and author from Spokane, Wash. "They get to puberty and past adulthood and don't know why they're alive. " His sentiments are easy to share in a nation still reeling from the images of Columbine High. But Gurian isn't talking about boys who kill their classmates.
LIVING
October 25, 1987 | By David O'Reilly, Inquirer Staff Writer
Can you recall the moment when you finally felt "adult"? Maybe it was the day you finished school, or got your own apartment. Maybe it was the day you got married or had your first child or got your first job. But perhaps this state called "adulthood" has proved strangely elusive, no matter what you do. If so, says Cheryl Merser, author of a new book called "Grown-Ups," you're not alone. "I know people around 40, and even older, still poised and waiting for their lives to begin," said Merser, a former publicist for Random House, during a recent interview.
NEWS
June 1, 1996 | By William Raspberry
You hear it a lot from men my age: "The Army made me a man. " It's never quite clear what we nostalgic ones (mostly draftees) have in mind. But it seems to involve some combination of learning to get along with all sorts of people, growing accustomed to putting the group's interest above our own and discovering we can handle physical discomfort and even danger. Nancy Geyer Christopher thinks we may simply be talking of growing up. Military service - at least during the days of the draft - was a rite of passage into adulthood.
NEWS
September 21, 1998 | BY TONY DPHAXILE KING
Colleges and universities grant millions of degrees to people. With all these brainiacs and intellects, why am I still waiting for a decent explanation for the infamous schoolyard shootings and murders? Why do some adolescents decide to walk into schoolyards, parade into classrooms or even tiptoe into their parents' bedrooms and pull a trigger? Unfortunately, not a single computer whiz or rocket scientist has offered an answer. Let me try. Children are the most fragile, honest, rational, reasonable, clear-headed species the human race has to offer.
NEWS
February 23, 2008 | By SOLOMON JONES
I'VE DECIDED that my 3-year-old son Solomon is a genius. No, he hasn't come up with a new theory of relativity. He hasn't developed a cure for cancer, either. Heck, he can't even read yet. So what is it that has me convinced of his superior mental ability? He told us that he doesn't want to grow up. At first, I thought Peter Pan made him say it. After all, Little Solomon has repeatedly watched the digitally restored, remastered, new and improved version of the original Disney classic (which looks a lot like the unrestored, unremastered, unimproved version that I watched when I was a kid)
NEWS
February 21, 1994 | by Mark de la Vina, Daily News Staff Writer
Gopher's gone to Washington. If people in their 20s ever needed a sign that their generation was in full-fledged adulthood, they need only to look back on the '80s when Fred Grandy, nautical nutboy Gopher on "The Love Boat," became U.S. Rep. Fred Grandy, R-Iowa But last week, Ben Stiller, hatchling of the television age and a guy who remembers the cast from "The Planet of the Apes" television series, has given us another milestone at the...
NEWS
August 25, 2003 | By Matthew P. Blanchard INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Meaningful adulthood rituals are hard to come by in modern America. But we do have college move-in day, a lengthy ritual of minivans, plastic shelving units, and tearful goodbyes that for some mark the attainment of adulthood more than any other moment. "Parents have invested so much in their kids and now they must dump them off and drive away," said the Rev. Rick Malloy, a sociology professor at St. Joseph's University. "This is ritual. This is pure anthropology. " The ritual was in full swing over the weekend as some of the Philadelphia region's 215,000 students headed back to the dorms.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
June 3, 2013
By Caren Lissner As the "new adult" genre moves beyond books, what does it mean about our own willingness to grow up? At the end of last month, the editors of Publishers Lunch, the publishing industry's daily digest of book deals, announced that they would add a new subgenre of literature to their ever-growing database of deals. "Welcome, new adult books," they wrote. "With six 'new adult' deal reports in the last month alone, we have created a new Deals subcategory for this growing genre.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 13, 2013 | By Wendy Rosenfield, For The Inquirer
There are plays about adolescence and plays for adolescents. Theatre Confetti's inaugural production, A. Rey Pamatmat's Edith Can Shoot Things and Hit Them , aims high at adults, but its bull's-eye is a younger target audience. Plenty of plays with kids as their subject make an easy transition to adulthood: Paula Vogel's How I Learned to Drive and Noah Haidle's Mr. Marmalade are but two examples of adult works with children as their messengers. But despite what could, in certain circles, be considered "adult themes," Pamatmat's sincerity and the straightforward, episodic nature of his script keep Edith Can Shoot Things and Hit Them squarely within the realm of Hansel-and-Gretel-style child-fantasy fulfillment (that's the Grimm edition, not this year's bounty-hunting witch-chasers)
BUSINESS
October 26, 2012 | By Jeff Gelles, Inquirer Columnist
In people years, the World Wide Web is barely 21. In technology time, it sometimes seems like eons since the first website went online in 1991, as the personal computer has morphed into increasingly powerful desktops, laptops, smartphones and tablets. Innovations, companies and devices have come and gone in the years since - which makes it all the more remarkable that we're focused this week on announcements by Apple and Microsoft, two players there at the start thanks to their pre-Web origins.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 8, 2010 | By Carrie Rickey, Inquirer Movie Critic
A glop of rom-com pabulum, Life as We Know It stars Katherine Heigl as Holly, tightly wound Atlanta chef, and Josh Duhamel as Messer, loosey-goosey sports producer. Fixed up by their respective best friends, they abort their blind date three minutes in. Three years later, when they are named foster parents to Sophie, said friends' orphaned infant, Holly and Messer take baby steps toward adulthood. With pratfalls and teardrops, the film swings from sitcom to sit-dram.
NEWS
September 23, 2010 | By GARY THOMPSON, thompsg@phillynews.com 215-854-5992
"Never Let Me Go" takes place in a monochrome British boarding school wherein each gray, regimented day blends dully into the next. The school is called Hailsham, but it might also be called Charlotte Rampling's Dour School for Expressionless Children Living Hopeless Lives, and you can guess, from Rampling's look of merciless authority (Judi Dench was unavailable) that nothing good goes on there. And you have to guess because "Never Let Me Go," adapted from Kazuo Ishiguro's equally withholding novel, is sly about doling out the details of the school's dark secret.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 4, 2010 | By Steven Rea, Inquirer Movie Critic
Not a great place to grow up, the Strobbe house: a cramped, ramshackle place with the toilet out back, a drunken father and three drunken uncles, their kindly but ineffectual mother pottering around, and Gunther - the protagonist of this very fine film from Holland - trying to focus on his schoolwork while mopping up the vomit and dodging the brawls. The Misfortunates , a beautifully shot adaptation of a semiautobiographical novel by Dimitri Verhulst, toggles between black and white and color, between Gunther's stormy adolescence, with its boozings and beatings, and his adulthood, when he's an aspiring novelist (he has the rejection letters to prove it)
NEWS
May 19, 2010 | By Monica Yant Kinney, Inquirer Columnist
Four fifth graders at the Russell Byers Charter School practically spit out the news of where they're headed next year: Springside, Agnes Irwin, Episcopal, and the Haverford School. Tuition at each elite private school runs well over $20,000 a year, but if the children suffer from sticker shock, they don't let on. Neither does Laurada Byers, 61, who sits across from her giddy charges silently sweating the dollar signs. Though many of Byers' brightest lights land at other rigorous charters or city magnets, it can be harder for them to get into Masterman than Baldwin.
NEWS
May 8, 2010 | By Robert Moran INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Ten miles from the Ohio border, Mike Gallagher, a 27-year-old from Philadelphia who is "just taking a stroll" to San Francisco, reflected on his monthlong trek across Pennsylvania. Once he passed Lancaster, he said, "it was like breaking through the atmosphere. Everything was new. " He is reporting his experiences on his blog, thewalk2010.com - like the time he decided to lie down for a rest near Bedford and drew the attention of police, who had received calls from passing motorists that there was a dead man on the side of the road.
NEWS
December 3, 2009 | By David Hiltbrand INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
'Socrates said the unexamined life is not worth living," says Mary Karr. "My life is certainly worth living. " That borders on understatement. Karr has distilled three acclaimed memoirs from her 54 turbulent years on the planet. Tonight at the Free Library she will be reading from her newest one, Lit, which chronicles a failed marriage, motherhood, alcoholism, and saving grace. It follows The Liars' Club in 1995, which recounts Karr's childhood in East Texas with a dipso, flipso mother, and Cherry in 2000, which plumbs her rebellious adolescence.
BUSINESS
April 19, 2009 | By Maria Panaritis INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
It was the rip-roaring Wall Street 1980s. Women were stuffing shoulder pads into power suits for a workforce on stock market steroids. The J. Geils Band was striking it rich with a more traditional spin: "Centerfold," a chart-topping ode to a classmate-turned-nude model. And in home-economics class, public school, Delaware County, Generation X was being prepared for the next two decades of boom-to-bust financial Darwinism by learning to make trail mix. I also learned to embroider purple thread onto the white felt teeth of a stuffed mouse with floppy ears.
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