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Advanced Placement

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NEWS
November 12, 1995 | By Matt White, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Keep up, everyone, because there's going to be a quiz before class ends. This is Advanced Placement Music Theory, one of three new college-level courses offered this year at West Deptford High School. Up on the chalkboard, teacher James Atkinson has filled several measures with notes. The lesson is chord analysis. Pay attention. "It would be C-sharp, E, G-sharp in root position. And the C-sharp is in the base," says Atkinson, scribbling notations and enigmatic musical formulas that, to an untrained eye, might look as inaccessible as vector calculus or Farsi.
NEWS
March 8, 2002 | By Maureen Fitzgerald INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Since September, Advanced Placement physics teacher Jim Hessler has been sprinting through Newton's laws, kinematics, systems of particles and momentum, circular motion and rotation, oscillations and gravitation, and electrostatics and magnetostatics. And now, with less than eight full weeks until the AP exam, he still has to teach his high school juniors and seniors about thermal, atomic and nuclear physics and quantum effects. "We do move pretty quickly," said Hessler, a teacher at Lenape High School in Medford.
NEWS
November 28, 1995 | By Gloria A. Hoffner, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
When the fall semester at the University of Pennsylvania began, there were no English composition or psychology 101 courses assigned to freshman Thomas Pologruto. Instead, Pologruto jumped right into the second-year math and science courses he needs to obtain two bachelor's degrees - one in biochemistry and the other in system science engineering - in four years. It's a timetable that the 18-year-old from Collingdale said he will meet, because he completed a year and a half of Ivy League college credits while he was a student at Monsignor Bonner High School in Drexel Hill.
NEWS
April 25, 1997 | By Steve Ritea, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Students who dream of attending prestigious schools and parents who have nightmares of paying prestigious tuition bills won a small victory in the school district this week. Advanced Placement (AP) courses, which impress university admissions officers and can reduce the number of costly college credits students need toward a degree, will be offered at Bensalem High School in the fall. About 25 students are expected to enroll in AP calculus or biology next semester, said Principal Steve Smith.
NEWS
October 26, 1994 | By Angela Paik, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Students in the Wallingford-Swarthmore School District are doing better than their peers nationally, but compared with their counterparts in suburbs coast to coast, they have work to do in some areas. Those results from standardized tests in several math and verbal areas, which were given to 1,829 district third to 10th graders last spring, were discussed at Monday's school board meeting. As part of the testing report, SAT and Advanced Placement test scores of older high school students also were disclosed.
NEWS
May 27, 2001 | By Gloria A. Hoffner INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Social-studies teacher Sister Nancy Bonshock doesn't believe in pop quizzes and quarterly exams. She believes in motivation. Students in her advanced-placement U.S. history and comparative-government classes at the Academy of Notre Dame de Namur can expect two to three hours of homework each night, including three weekly essays and daily reading assignments, but never a test. Her teaching style, and successful students, have earned her the 2001 Middle States Regional Assembly Advanced Placement recognition award from the College Board.
NEWS
May 6, 2003
WE CAN agree that Moorestown High School honor student Blair Hornstine has brought no honor to herself or her school. Her suit seeking $2.7 million from the school is excessive and frivolous. But the school's decision to name a co-valedictorian to share an honor that she alone earned doesn't seem fair, either. The school responded to complaints from irate parents who felt that Hornstine's achievement is tainted because she was home-schooled. She earned an A-plus average taking the same advanced- placement courses other high achievers took and from the same teachers.
NEWS
January 5, 2011 | By John P. Martin, Inquirer Staff Writer
An award-winning science teacher at Lower Merion High School has been suspended after one of his former students told school officials that she had a romantic relationship with him while she was his student. Robert G. Schanne, 43, left the school after officials confronted him with the allegations last month, according to multiple sources who had been made aware of the details but said they were not authorized to publicly discuss them. Reached at home last month by The Inquirer, Schanne did not dispute the allegations but said before hanging up, "I'm not allowed to comment.
NEWS
October 15, 1995 | By Louise Harbach, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Before coming to Cherokee High School five years ago to teach social studies, Scott Sax worked as a counselor for a drug rehabilitation center and halfway house, a psychodrama and music therapist, and an aide in a psychiatric crisis unit. Now he has a new role: psychology teacher in the Burlington County Interactive Television Consortium, a group of six high schools linked with Burlington County College through fiber optics. The consortium, which offers interactive courses in Italian, literature, Spanish, French, advanced-placement calculus, sociology and advanced-placement psychology, consists of Cherokee, Shawnee and Lenape, the three high schools in the Lenape district; Burlington County Institute of Technology's two campuses; Pemberton High School, and Burlington County College.
NEWS
July 21, 1995 | By Allie Shah, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Because more high school students are taking advanced-placement classes, the Souderton Area School District is considering offering more honors courses for juniors and seniors who want the rigor of an AP class but not its mandatory achievement exam. District policy now requires students enrolled in an AP class to take the test, which can exempt them from entry-level courses in many colleges nationwide. The students also must pay the $72 exam fee. In the past, the test was optional for students.
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NEWS
March 23, 2015 | By Kathy Boccella, Inquirer Staff Writer
It was not your typical March Madness for the competitors who were vying to become the Final Five. The fans inside the Chester County high school weren't crowded around a basketball court, but around lab tables. The only hoops the kids had to jump through were metaphoric: the pressure of defending scientific theories during sharp questioning from physics experts. Success meant a trip of a lifetime to Thailand this summer. The students, who in June will become the first U.S. team in eight years to take part in the prestigious International Young Physicists Tournament, aren't from any upscale private academy - they're just hardworking kids from Phoenixville Area High School.
NEWS
February 11, 2015 | By Kelly Flynn, Inquirer Staff Writer
When Clearview Regional High School teacher Jenna Scott informed her students that U.S. Rep. Frank LoBiondo (R., N.J.) was coming to their Advanced Placement government and politics class, she told them to do their research and ask about something more than his life. They did, questioning the congressman on Monday on a variety of issues, including the plight of Atlantic City, the implications of the Patriot Act, and the future of the Guantanamo Bay detention camp for terror suspects.
NEWS
January 13, 2014 | By Kristen A. Graham, Inquirer Staff Writer
RADNOR Jillian Hughes attends a public school with 22 Advanced Placement courses, 96 percent of students going on to college or trade school, and a sense of community so strong that 300 students formed a club just to turn up and cheer at school sporting events. "We have everything we need," Hughes, 15, said of Radnor High. Moved by the Philadelphia School District's extraordinary budget crunch and the wide gulf between her own education and that of city students, Hughes recently gathered and distributed supplies for pupils at one Philadelphia elementary school.
NEWS
December 5, 2013 | By Kathy Boccella, Inquirer Staff Writer
The five teenagers gathered around a table at Upper Darby High School had journeyed from every corner of the planet to reach this place and achieve a shared dream: a college education and a successful career. "I want to be a dermatologist and go back to my country and help people," said Washington Saah, a 16-year-old who came from Liberia to the Philadelphia suburbs by way of Arkansas. Maria Jimenez, 15, from Nicaragua, wants to become a psychologist, but acknowledged that learning English and fitting in has been a struggle.
NEWS
April 19, 2013 | BY REGINA MEDINA, Daily News Staff Writer medinar@phillynews.com, 215-854-5985
THE SCHOOL DISTRICT of Philadelphia is getting into the cyber-school business this fall in an attempt to win back city students who attend cyber-charter schools, which cost the district more per pupil. The Philadelphia Virtual Academy, for kids in grades six through 12, would offer some real-life perks, such as a drop-in center where students can meet up with fellow students as well as a support team for each pupil. Every team includes a teacher and technical specialist. "We want to begin competing for students," schools Superintendent William Hite said in a news briefing.
NEWS
April 19, 2013 | By Kristen A. Graham, Inquirer Staff Writer
Cyber charter schools, watch out. The Philadelphia School District is coming for your students. Come September, the district - pending School Reform Commission approval Thursday night - will launch the Philadelphia Virtual Academy, an online school for city sixth through 12th graders. The move could net the financially distressed district millions of dollars. This year, about 6,000 city students are enrolled in cyber charters, at a cost to the school system of about $60 million.
NEWS
January 5, 2011 | By John P. Martin, Inquirer Staff Writer
An award-winning science teacher at Lower Merion High School has been suspended after one of his former students told school officials that she had a romantic relationship with him while she was his student. Robert G. Schanne, 43, left the school after officials confronted him with the allegations last month, according to multiple sources who had been made aware of the details but said they were not authorized to publicly discuss them. Reached at home last month by The Inquirer, Schanne did not dispute the allegations but said before hanging up, "I'm not allowed to comment.
NEWS
December 2, 2009 | By Dan Hardy INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
In 1976, a year after Amy S. Sichel arrived in Philadelphia for graduate school at the University of Pennsylvania, she saw a job posting for a counselor in the Abington School District. "Knowing nothing about the suburbs, I applied for the job and got it," Sichel said this week. It turned out to be a great match. Sichel, now 56, rose through the system, becoming superintendent in 2001. Yesterday, she was named Pennsylvania's Superintendent of the Year by the state's association of school administrators.
NEWS
February 8, 2008 | By Susan Snyder INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The 10th-grade English class spilled onto the steps of West Philadelphia High School yesterday, armed with notebooks and pens for a poetry assignment. Shamir Harper, 15, gazed up and wrote "how big and beautiful" the clouds were. Rasoul Knight, 16, felt the warmer-than-usual breeze and wrote that it "smells like fresh clothes out of the laundry. " Another classmate inched closer to a tree to try to think of a metaphor or simile to describe it. Passersby saw a far different scene last year outside the school at 4700 Walnut St., not far from the University of Pennsylvania campus.
NEWS
February 8, 2006 | By Kristen A. Graham and Kellie Patrick INQUIRER STAFF WRITERS
On the heels of President Bush's call to raise the level of difficulty in high schools through an expansion of the Advanced Placement program, the College Board reported yesterday that more AP students are mastering difficult work. Nationwide, 14.1 percent of all students who graduated in June demonstrated mastery of at least one AP course, according to Advanced Placement's newly released "Report to the Nation. " Pennsylvania's students fared worse than the national average, with 10.5 percent of its students earning that distinction; New Jersey surpassed the average, at 16.5 percent.
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