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BUSINESS
December 18, 2013 | By Chris Mondics, Inquirer Staff Writer
A lawsuit alleging that Lundy Law L.L.P., a worker-compensation firm based in Philadelphia, violated federal antitrust restrictions by locking up advertising on SEPTA buses and KYW drive-time radio has been dismissed by U.S. District Judge Cynthia Rufe. Rufe said Lundy, whose advertisements can be seen on buses throughout the region, had not breached federal antitrust laws because competitor Larry Pitt & Associates likely had other advertising options. At the same time, Rufe permitted Pitt to move forward with a claim that Lundy falsely stated in its advertisements that it handled Social Security disability claims when in fact it referred those cases to other firms.
BUSINESS
July 23, 1986 | By Ewart Rouse, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Philadelphia Industrial Development Corp. yesterday fired Earle Palmer Brown Cos./Philadelphia as its advertising agency and hired Shaeffer & Associates. The account is valued at $400,000 a year. Joan McCallion, PIDC's director of marketing, said the corporation decided to switch agencies because several employees at Earle Palmer Brown who had worked on the account no longer worked at that agency. She said their departure followed the change in the ownership and the name of the agency in 1984 - from Kalish & Rice to Earle Palmer Brown.
NEWS
September 9, 2011 | By Sally A. Downey, Inquirer Staff Writer
Richard S. Meyer, 96, of Melrose Park, a retired department store advertising executive who restored vintage telephones, died Wednesday, Aug. 31, at Abramson Center for Jewish Life in Horsham. Mr. Meyer began his career at 15, working in the advertising office at the Hecht Co. in Washington, his hometown. During World War II, he worked for Martin Aircraft in Maryland. After the war, he did advertising for Lansburgh & Bro. in Washington before returning to Hecht's as advertising manager in 1948.
NEWS
September 26, 2011 | By Sally A. Downey, Inquirer Staff Writer
Anthony J. D'Lauro Jr., 80, formerly of Blue Bell, a retired advertising executive and owner of DiNardo's Famous Seafood in Old City, died of pulmonary fibrosis Wednesday, Sept. 14, at Physicians Regional Hospital in Naples, Fla. When he was working in advertising, Mr. D'Lauro took clients to the original DiNardo's restaurant in Wilmington. He used to say he could gauge clients' personalities watching them cope with platters of hard-shell crabs, a daughter, Jane DiNola, said. In 1976, Mr. D'Lauro opened DiNardo's Famous Seafood at Third and Race Streets, with partners Bill DiNardo and Ralph Patrone.
NEWS
April 28, 2012
SUBSCRIBER SERVICES http://service.philly.com Foryourconvenience,youcanstartasubscription,temporarilystopdelivery, registeraservicecomplaint,reviewyourrecentbilling history, or pay yourbill onlineby contactingusatourWeb site, http://service.philly.com . You can also call our toll-free customer service number: 1-800-222-2765. The Customer Service Center is open Monday through Friday, 6 a.m. to 1 p.m.; Saturday and Sunday, 7 a.m. to 10 a.m. You can reach us at 1-800-222-2765.
BUSINESS
October 23, 2013 | By Chris Mondics, Inquirer Staff Writer
Far from quietly settling their differences, two Philadelphia law firms locked in a dispute over the right to advertise on SEPTA buses have intensified their battle. Larry Pitt & Associates sued Lundy Law in U.S. District Court in Philadelphia in May, alleging that Lundy had illegally entered into contracts with SEPTA and other regional transit agencies giving the firm the exclusive right to advertise on the exterior of buses. Pitt accused Lundy of antitrust violations, and Lundy filed a motion asking that the suit be dismissed.
NEWS
June 27, 2008
PLEASE take out those disgusting ads for "My Rich Uncle. " I read the paper during lunch, and nearly it looking at the picture of a couple missing the tops of their heads. I'm all for advertising, but do they think people are going subscribe to their company by grossing them out? I'm heaving just thinking about it! Lenise Johnson, Wilmington, Del.
NEWS
May 3, 2013 | BY JAN RANSOM, Daily News Staff Writer ransomj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5218
WILL THERE soon be digital ads on publicly owned property? A bill sponsored by Council President Darrell Clarke that would authorize ads on city-owned property was overwhelmingly approved yesterday, but Clarke remained skeptical, noting that the city pulled back a request for proposals (RFP) on a similar bill last year. "The opportunities are limitless," Clarke said. "I would like to see us move ahead, get the RFP out, get a contract done and start bringing in some much needed revenue.
NEWS
December 16, 2011 | BY JAN RANSOM, ransomj@phillynews.com 215-854-5218
A CONTROVERSIAL bill that would have allowed gigantic wall-wrap advertising on a single building near the Vine Expressway officially died yesterday as City Council wrapped its last session of the year. As promised, Mayor Nutter vetoed the legislation sponsored by Councilman Frank DiCicco that would have permitted the advertising on a building at 7th and Willow streets - site of previous lawsuits and fines related to an illegally erected ad. DiCicco managed to get the measure passed Dec. 1 with 12 votes - the number needed to override a veto - but some of those supporters were uneasy after letters from the Pennsylvania Department of Transportation and City Solicitor Shelley Smith warned the measure could have jeopardized federal highway funding.
NEWS
February 2, 2012 | BY JAN RANSOM, ransomj@phillynews.com215-854-5218
Raising new dough is on City Council's to-do list, and members see dollar signs on school buses. Councilwoman Blondell Reynolds Brown introduced legislation Thursday that would allow advertising on the city's 1,250 school buses. That would yield roughly $1 million to help the school district, which recently said that it must cut another $61 million from its budget. "Some might argue that's a drop in the bucket, but when school boards have to figure out the difference between an art and music teacher or new textbooks or fewer costs, let's explore how we can fund those needed items," Reynolds Brown said.
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