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SPORTS
August 14, 2015 | DAILY NEWS STAFF
TWO predictions: One, the day is coming, and soon, where North American teams will have advertising logos on their uniforms. And, two, nobody will care. Every sport is on a full-time mission to squeeze every buck it can out of the business. I mean, it has gotten to the point where the NFL is apparently considering moving the annual Super Bowl media day from Tuesday morning/afternoon to Monday night in primetime on the East Coast - apparently on the theory that if people will watch three days worth of draft coverage, and endless repetitions of players performing the shuttle run at the combine, they'll watch anything.
NEWS
April 20, 2013 | By Troy Graham, Inquirer Staff Writer
Philadelphia City Council President Darrell L. Clarke first proposed selling advertising on city property as a way to raise extra cash in November 2011, and he championed the idea again two months later from the stage at the Academy of Music before Mayor Nutter's second inauguration. Reporters afterward wanted to know if Nutter and the new Council president could get along, considering their past political animosities. If Clarke's municipal advertising proposal is any barometer, that relationship hasn't been going very well.
BUSINESS
May 24, 2012 | Paul Nussbaum
Philadelphia International Airport has awarded a $20.4 million, seven-year contract for airport advertising to Clear Channel Airports, of Allentown, the company said Wednesday. The company will install 76 large digital screens to display advertising, including thirteen 70-inch screens in baggage-claim areas and 50-square-foot digital walls on the overhead arches of concourses B and C, said president Toby Sturek. The city-owned airport will receive a minimum of $20.4 million over the seven years of the contract, or 60 to 65 percent of gross ad sales, if that amount is greater, under terms of a contract signed this month by Mayor Nutter.
NEWS
May 4, 2013 | By Troy Graham, Inquirer Staff Writer
  Philadelphia City Council passed a bill Thursday to allow advertising on municipal property - an idea championed by President Darrell L. Clarke to raise money without hiking taxes. The bill is just the first step, giving zoning permission and setting up a task force that would explore which buildings and other property would be appropriate for advertising and what kinds would be allowed. Ultimately, Mayor Nutter would have to sign a contract with a vendor that would seek and manage advertising.
NEWS
December 13, 2011 | BY VALERIE RUSS & JAN RANSOM, russv@phillynews.com 215-854-5987
MAYOR Nutter said yesterday that he would veto a controversial wall-wrap bill that City Council passed Dec. 1 despite a letter from the state saying that it violates federal law and jeopardizes federal highway funding for the city. The wall wrap, planned for a building at 7th and Willow, near Callowhill Street, would violate Federal Highway Administration regulations and the Highway Beautification Act because it would be within 660 feet of the Vine Expressway, according to the Dec. 1 letter from the Pennsylvania Department of Transportation.
BUSINESS
December 18, 2013 | By Chris Mondics, Inquirer Staff Writer
A lawsuit alleging that Lundy Law L.L.P., a worker-compensation firm based in Philadelphia, violated federal antitrust restrictions by locking up advertising on SEPTA buses and KYW drive-time radio has been dismissed by U.S. District Judge Cynthia Rufe. Rufe said Lundy, whose advertisements can be seen on buses throughout the region, had not breached federal antitrust laws because competitor Larry Pitt & Associates likely had other advertising options. At the same time, Rufe permitted Pitt to move forward with a claim that Lundy falsely stated in its advertisements that it handled Social Security disability claims when in fact it referred those cases to other firms.
BUSINESS
July 23, 1986 | By Ewart Rouse, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Philadelphia Industrial Development Corp. yesterday fired Earle Palmer Brown Cos./Philadelphia as its advertising agency and hired Shaeffer & Associates. The account is valued at $400,000 a year. Joan McCallion, PIDC's director of marketing, said the corporation decided to switch agencies because several employees at Earle Palmer Brown who had worked on the account no longer worked at that agency. She said their departure followed the change in the ownership and the name of the agency in 1984 - from Kalish & Rice to Earle Palmer Brown.
NEWS
September 9, 2011 | By Sally A. Downey, Inquirer Staff Writer
Richard S. Meyer, 96, of Melrose Park, a retired department store advertising executive who restored vintage telephones, died Wednesday, Aug. 31, at Abramson Center for Jewish Life in Horsham. Mr. Meyer began his career at 15, working in the advertising office at the Hecht Co. in Washington, his hometown. During World War II, he worked for Martin Aircraft in Maryland. After the war, he did advertising for Lansburgh & Bro. in Washington before returning to Hecht's as advertising manager in 1948.
BUSINESS
January 24, 2015 | By Bob Fernandez, Inquirer Staff Writer
From grass turf to the video stream inside your home, Comcast Corp. will have a hand in Super Bowl XLIX between the New England Patriots and the Seattle Seahawks. "Top to bottom, it's really a Comcast event," John Page, president of Comcast-controlled Global Spectrum, said of the Feb. 1 NFL championship. Global Spectrum, part of Comcast-Spectacor and based at the Wells Fargo Center in South Philadelphia, manages the state-of-the-art University of Phoenix Stadium in Glendale, Ariz., where 12,000 people are expected to work on game day - opening the gates for fans, shuttling the Katy Perry halftime show on and off the gridiron stage in the allotted time, and managing security.
BUSINESS
October 23, 2013 | By Chris Mondics, Inquirer Staff Writer
Far from quietly settling their differences, two Philadelphia law firms locked in a dispute over the right to advertise on SEPTA buses have intensified their battle. Larry Pitt & Associates sued Lundy Law in U.S. District Court in Philadelphia in May, alleging that Lundy had illegally entered into contracts with SEPTA and other regional transit agencies giving the firm the exclusive right to advertise on the exterior of buses. Pitt accused Lundy of antitrust violations, and Lundy filed a motion asking that the suit be dismissed.
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