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BUSINESS
July 23, 1986 | By Ewart Rouse, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Philadelphia Industrial Development Corp. yesterday fired Earle Palmer Brown Cos./Philadelphia as its advertising agency and hired Shaeffer & Associates. The account is valued at $400,000 a year. Joan McCallion, PIDC's director of marketing, said the corporation decided to switch agencies because several employees at Earle Palmer Brown who had worked on the account no longer worked at that agency. She said their departure followed the change in the ownership and the name of the agency in 1984 - from Kalish & Rice to Earle Palmer Brown.
NEWS
September 9, 2011 | By Sally A. Downey, Inquirer Staff Writer
Richard S. Meyer, 96, of Melrose Park, a retired department store advertising executive who restored vintage telephones, died Wednesday, Aug. 31, at Abramson Center for Jewish Life in Horsham. Mr. Meyer began his career at 15, working in the advertising office at the Hecht Co. in Washington, his hometown. During World War II, he worked for Martin Aircraft in Maryland. After the war, he did advertising for Lansburgh & Bro. in Washington before returning to Hecht's as advertising manager in 1948.
BUSINESS
January 22, 2015 | By Bob Fernandez, Inquirer Staff Writer
From grass turf to the video stream inside your home, Comcast Corp. will have a hand in Super Bowl XLIX between the New England Patriots and the Seattle Seahawks. "Top-to-bottom, it's really a Comcast event," John Page, president of Comcast-controlled Global Spectrum, said of the Feb. 1 NFL championship. Global Spectrum, part of Comcast-Spectacor and based at the Wells Fargo Center in South Philadelphia, manages the state-of-the-art University of Phoenix Stadium in Glendale, Ariz., where 12,000 people are expected to work on game day - opening the gates for fans, shuttling the Katy Perry halftime show on and off the gridiron stage in the allotted time, and managing security.
NEWS
June 27, 2008
PLEASE take out those disgusting ads for "My Rich Uncle. " I read the paper during lunch, and nearly it looking at the picture of a couple missing the tops of their heads. I'm all for advertising, but do they think people are going subscribe to their company by grossing them out? I'm heaving just thinking about it! Lenise Johnson, Wilmington, Del.
SPORTS
August 14, 2015 | DAILY NEWS STAFF
TWO predictions: One, the day is coming, and soon, where North American teams will have advertising logos on their uniforms. And, two, nobody will care. Every sport is on a full-time mission to squeeze every buck it can out of the business. I mean, it has gotten to the point where the NFL is apparently considering moving the annual Super Bowl media day from Tuesday morning/afternoon to Monday night in primetime on the East Coast - apparently on the theory that if people will watch three days worth of draft coverage, and endless repetitions of players performing the shuttle run at the combine, they'll watch anything.
NEWS
May 3, 2013 | BY JAN RANSOM, Daily News Staff Writer ransomj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5218
WILL THERE soon be digital ads on publicly owned property? A bill sponsored by Council President Darrell Clarke that would authorize ads on city-owned property was overwhelmingly approved yesterday, but Clarke remained skeptical, noting that the city pulled back a request for proposals (RFP) on a similar bill last year. "The opportunities are limitless," Clarke said. "I would like to see us move ahead, get the RFP out, get a contract done and start bringing in some much needed revenue.
NEWS
December 16, 2011 | BY JAN RANSOM, ransomj@phillynews.com 215-854-5218
A CONTROVERSIAL bill that would have allowed gigantic wall-wrap advertising on a single building near the Vine Expressway officially died yesterday as City Council wrapped its last session of the year. As promised, Mayor Nutter vetoed the legislation sponsored by Councilman Frank DiCicco that would have permitted the advertising on a building at 7th and Willow streets - site of previous lawsuits and fines related to an illegally erected ad. DiCicco managed to get the measure passed Dec. 1 with 12 votes - the number needed to override a veto - but some of those supporters were uneasy after letters from the Pennsylvania Department of Transportation and City Solicitor Shelley Smith warned the measure could have jeopardized federal highway funding.
NEWS
February 2, 2012 | BY JAN RANSOM, ransomj@phillynews.com215-854-5218
Raising new dough is on City Council's to-do list, and members see dollar signs on school buses. Councilwoman Blondell Reynolds Brown introduced legislation Thursday that would allow advertising on the city's 1,250 school buses. That would yield roughly $1 million to help the school district, which recently said that it must cut another $61 million from its budget. "Some might argue that's a drop in the bucket, but when school boards have to figure out the difference between an art and music teacher or new textbooks or fewer costs, let's explore how we can fund those needed items," Reynolds Brown said.
NEWS
February 29, 2012 | By Troy Graham, Inquirer Staff Writer
Following a poll that showed a growing majority of Philadelphians concerned about the city's high tax burden, Mayor Nutter pledged Tuesday not to seek any new taxes in the coming budget, though some recent increases billed as temporary may become permanent. "The mayor has no intention of requesting a tax increase," his spokesman, Mark McDonald, said. City residents have endured four years of tax increases, including two "temporary" property tax increases, as the city has scrambled to make up for revenue lost from the recession.
NEWS
December 25, 2013 | By Allison Steele, Inquirer Staff Writer
Robert Jawer, 91, of Rydal, a local television pioneer and producer whose career at KYW spanned almost 45 years, died Friday, Dec. 20, of complications from pneumonia at his home. Jawer was an early believer in the value of using television for advertisements, and is believed to have been Philadelphia's first broadcast television salesman. Raised in West Philadelphia, Mr. Jawer served in the Army during World War II. He was returning home when a magazine article about the then-new medium caught his eye, and after graduating from the University of Pennsylvania's Wharton School, he enrolled in the Television Workshop in New York City to learn the basics.
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