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NEWS
March 16, 2012 | By Michael Smerconish
Though the advertising boycott of Rush Limbaugh is significant for its size and scope, it will ultimately prove ineffectual in dislodging him from his commanding perch above the talk-radio world. That kind of movement would require a different type of acquiescence, namely on the part of program directors, not advertisers. And though there is a strong case to be made for such a course correction, there are no guarantees those who determine content will stray from their current business model.
NEWS
March 6, 2012 | By Philip Elliott, Associated Press
WASHINGTON - Radio host Rush Limbaugh said his apology to the Georgetown law student whom he called a "slut" was sincere but also joked that he, too, got a busy signal Monday when he called the show to join the growing roster of advertisers abandoning it. The student, Sandra Fluke, said that Limbaugh's apology did nothing to change the corrosive tone of the debate over health-care coverage and that Americans had to decide whether they wanted to...
NEWS
February 29, 2012 | By Troy Graham, Inquirer Staff Writer
Following a poll that showed a growing majority of Philadelphians concerned about the city's high tax burden, Mayor Nutter pledged Tuesday not to seek any new taxes in the coming budget, though some recent increases billed as temporary may become permanent. "The mayor has no intention of requesting a tax increase," his spokesman, Mark McDonald, said. City residents have endured four years of tax increases, including two "temporary" property tax increases, as the city has scrambled to make up for revenue lost from the recession.
NEWS
February 19, 2012 | By Kevin Ferris, Inquirer Columnist
When it comes to the realities of life in journalism, no one prepared me more while I was an undergrad at Virginia Commonwealth University than Bill Turpin. He was No. 2 in the department of mass communications when I arrived in the fall of 1979 after three years in the Army. In a previous life, he had been a small-town newspaper publisher. And in that small Southern town, he saw the impact he had on his community every day. If readers didn't like something in his paper, he heard about it. If they didn't get their paper on time, they let him know.
NEWS
February 7, 2012 | By John F. Morrison, Daily News Staff Writer
James J. Brennan, 67, of South Philadelphia, a longtime advertising salesman for The Inquirer, died Friday, Feb. 3, at home of complications from Alzheimer's disease. Mr. Brennan was a Mummer, a traveler, and a Civil War buff, but above all, he was a skilled salesman and devoted family man. "He could sell ice to Eskimos," said his wife, the former Jacqueline Bonanno. "He was the love of my life. " "The sun really did rise and set in my father's eyes," said his daughter, Jennifer Brennan Matteo.
NEWS
February 2, 2012 | BY JAN RANSOM, ransomj@phillynews.com215-854-5218
Raising new dough is on City Council's to-do list, and members see dollar signs on school buses. Councilwoman Blondell Reynolds Brown introduced legislation Thursday that would allow advertising on the city's 1,250 school buses. That would yield roughly $1 million to help the school district, which recently said that it must cut another $61 million from its budget. "Some might argue that's a drop in the bucket, but when school boards have to figure out the difference between an art and music teacher or new textbooks or fewer costs, let's explore how we can fund those needed items," Reynolds Brown said.
BUSINESS
January 4, 2012 | By Michael Marot, Associated Press
INDIANAPOLIS - Super Bowl spots are still the hottest ticket in advertising. Comcast Corp.-owned NBC has sold all the commercial airtime for the Feb. 5 game in Indianapolis and even has a waiting list of advertisers. The average cost for a 30-second spot this year was $3.5 million, with some time slots costing as much as $4 million. Seth Winter, senior vice president of NBC Sports group sales and marketing, said in a recent interview that the last time slot was sold just after Thanksgiving.
NEWS
December 19, 2011 | By Jeff Gammage, Inquirer Staff Writer
Got your Stompeez yet? If not, it's too late. The rainbow-colored children's slippers, shaped like puppies, unicorns, or alligators, with mouths or eyes that open and close, are sold out. That's a fact that Sherri Hope Culver, a Temple University scholar who studies the impact of advertising, regards with a certain professional admiration. The endless holiday rotation of Stompeez TV commercials apparently did its job, enticing kids to crave an odd, previously unknown sort of footwear and parents to plunk down $19.95, plus postage and handling.
NEWS
December 16, 2011 | BY JAN RANSOM, ransomj@phillynews.com 215-854-5218
A CONTROVERSIAL bill that would have allowed gigantic wall-wrap advertising on a single building near the Vine Expressway officially died yesterday as City Council wrapped its last session of the year. As promised, Mayor Nutter vetoed the legislation sponsored by Councilman Frank DiCicco that would have permitted the advertising on a building at 7th and Willow streets - site of previous lawsuits and fines related to an illegally erected ad. DiCicco managed to get the measure passed Dec. 1 with 12 votes - the number needed to override a veto - but some of those supporters were uneasy after letters from the Pennsylvania Department of Transportation and City Solicitor Shelley Smith warned the measure could have jeopardized federal highway funding.
NEWS
December 16, 2011 | By Troy Graham, Inquirer Staff Writer
On a day when City Council wrapped up years of work on several major bills and bid adieu to six colleagues with more than a century of combined experience, Councilman Darrell L. Clarke was looking to the future. Clarke, who is slated to become Council president Jan. 2, introduced two bills Thursday at the final meeting of the term, perhaps offering a preview of his leadership. Both bills seek ways to generate money for the city without raising taxes - something the Nutter administration has been forced to do three years in a row. "I think it's time for us to come up with another strategy," Clarke said.
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