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NEWS
February 2, 2012 | BY JAN RANSOM, ransomj@phillynews.com215-854-5218
Raising new dough is on City Council's to-do list, and members see dollar signs on school buses. Councilwoman Blondell Reynolds Brown introduced legislation Thursday that would allow advertising on the city's 1,250 school buses. That would yield roughly $1 million to help the school district, which recently said that it must cut another $61 million from its budget. "Some might argue that's a drop in the bucket, but when school boards have to figure out the difference between an art and music teacher or new textbooks or fewer costs, let's explore how we can fund those needed items," Reynolds Brown said.
BUSINESS
January 4, 2012 | By Michael Marot, Associated Press
INDIANAPOLIS - Super Bowl spots are still the hottest ticket in advertising. Comcast Corp.-owned NBC has sold all the commercial airtime for the Feb. 5 game in Indianapolis and even has a waiting list of advertisers. The average cost for a 30-second spot this year was $3.5 million, with some time slots costing as much as $4 million. Seth Winter, senior vice president of NBC Sports group sales and marketing, said in a recent interview that the last time slot was sold just after Thanksgiving.
NEWS
December 19, 2011 | By Jeff Gammage, Inquirer Staff Writer
Got your Stompeez yet? If not, it's too late. The rainbow-colored children's slippers, shaped like puppies, unicorns, or alligators, with mouths or eyes that open and close, are sold out. That's a fact that Sherri Hope Culver, a Temple University scholar who studies the impact of advertising, regards with a certain professional admiration. The endless holiday rotation of Stompeez TV commercials apparently did its job, enticing kids to crave an odd, previously unknown sort of footwear and parents to plunk down $19.95, plus postage and handling.
NEWS
December 16, 2011 | BY JAN RANSOM, ransomj@phillynews.com 215-854-5218
A CONTROVERSIAL bill that would have allowed gigantic wall-wrap advertising on a single building near the Vine Expressway officially died yesterday as City Council wrapped its last session of the year. As promised, Mayor Nutter vetoed the legislation sponsored by Councilman Frank DiCicco that would have permitted the advertising on a building at 7th and Willow streets - site of previous lawsuits and fines related to an illegally erected ad. DiCicco managed to get the measure passed Dec. 1 with 12 votes - the number needed to override a veto - but some of those supporters were uneasy after letters from the Pennsylvania Department of Transportation and City Solicitor Shelley Smith warned the measure could have jeopardized federal highway funding.
NEWS
December 16, 2011 | By Troy Graham, Inquirer Staff Writer
On a day when City Council wrapped up years of work on several major bills and bid adieu to six colleagues with more than a century of combined experience, Councilman Darrell L. Clarke was looking to the future. Clarke, who is slated to become Council president Jan. 2, introduced two bills Thursday at the final meeting of the term, perhaps offering a preview of his leadership. Both bills seek ways to generate money for the city without raising taxes - something the Nutter administration has been forced to do three years in a row. "I think it's time for us to come up with another strategy," Clarke said.
NEWS
December 13, 2011 | BY VALERIE RUSS & JAN RANSOM, russv@phillynews.com 215-854-5987
MAYOR Nutter said yesterday that he would veto a controversial wall-wrap bill that City Council passed Dec. 1 despite a letter from the state saying that it violates federal law and jeopardizes federal highway funding for the city. The wall wrap, planned for a building at 7th and Willow, near Callowhill Street, would violate Federal Highway Administration regulations and the Highway Beautification Act because it would be within 660 feet of the Vine Expressway, according to the Dec. 1 letter from the Pennsylvania Department of Transportation.
NEWS
November 18, 2011 | By Troy Graham, Inquirer Staff Writer
After members of Occupy Philly interrupted City Council on Thursday, shouting down attempts to restore order and creating a circus-like atmosphere for their own mock session, the actual elected members got down to a varied and lengthy agenda. The results included a bill to let restaurant servers keep all of their tips, approval of a major construction project to turn gas from a city wastewater plant into electricity, and a debate on the place of advertising in the public sphere.
SPORTS
October 17, 2011 | BY MIKE KERN, kernm@phillynews.com
THERE WERE NO real surprises in the season's first BCS standings. Louisiana State was first, by a narrow margin over Alabama, followed by Oklahoma. That's the same order as the polls. But it gets a little different at No. 4, where Oklahoma State checks in with its highest ranking ever. In 2008, OSU started No. 6 and finished 13th. Boise State is next. The rest of the top 10 reads: Wisconsin, Clemson, Stanford, Arkansas and Oregon. Penn State checks in at No. 21. The BCS is a three-pronged formula that uses the Harris Interactive (media)
NEWS
September 26, 2011 | By Sally A. Downey, Inquirer Staff Writer
Anthony J. D'Lauro Jr., 80, formerly of Blue Bell, a retired advertising executive and owner of DiNardo's Famous Seafood in Old City, died of pulmonary fibrosis Wednesday, Sept. 14, at Physicians Regional Hospital in Naples, Fla. When he was working in advertising, Mr. D'Lauro took clients to the original DiNardo's restaurant in Wilmington. He used to say he could gauge clients' personalities watching them cope with platters of hard-shell crabs, a daughter, Jane DiNola, said. In 1976, Mr. D'Lauro opened DiNardo's Famous Seafood at Third and Race Streets, with partners Bill DiNardo and Ralph Patrone.
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