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Advice And Consent

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NEWS
March 21, 2001 | By Vicki McClure INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Four months after Mayor Gerald Luongo lost his bid for reelection and five days after the new administration named a permanent police chief, the Appellate Division of Superior Court ruled yesterday that Luongo had the authority to name an interim police chief. A three-judge panel found that "no statute or legal principle" prohibits a mayor "from making an interim appointment within the executive branch of government. " The judges decided that the case had not been "rendered moot" by Luongo's November defeat because Mayor Randee Davidson appointed an interim chief after she took office Jan. 1. The case originated from a lawsuit filed in December 1999 by Deputy Chief James Murphy, who challenged not only his demotion to lieutenant but also Luongo's promotion of Cpl. Edmund Giordano to interim chief without the "advice and consent" of the Township Council.
NEWS
October 17, 1991 | From Bill Tammeus, Kansas City Star
BILL'S WORLD From Bill Tammeus, Kansas City Star: Norman Mailer's new CIA epic, "Harlot's Ghost," is being widely panned. Oh, come on. It can't be much worse than the Gates hearings. "What the economy needs is a shot of confidence," says President Bush. What's the economic equivalent of invading Grenada? Midlife crisis: It's not just when you tell your kids things your folks told you but also when they reply with the same smart-aleck words you used as a kid. On Supreme Court nominees, the Senate is supposed to give advice and consent.
NEWS
January 4, 1989 | By Frank Langfitt, Special to The Inquirer
Washington Township's new council kicked off its first meeting of the year with the usual partisan wrangling last night as two Republican councilmen tried but failed to delay consent on key administrative appointments by Democratic Mayor Gerald Luongo. Despite the objections of Republican councilmen Leonard Simmons and John Rogale, the Township Council consented to the reappointment of Joseph Alacqua as township solicitor, James Devereaux as business administrator, Mark F. Fruits as head of the Department of Public Works and William Hampton as township engineer.
NEWS
May 27, 1986 | By Maureen Graham, Special to The Inquirer
The local law-enforcement union has taken a stand in a power struggle between Washington Township Mayor John Robertson and the township council over the selection of a new police chief. Detective Edmund Giordano, president of the 52-person Police Benevolent Association No. 318, said yesterday that members present at the union's monthly meeting last week had "voted unanimously to support Detective Sgt. Richard Moore," the mayor's appointee. But a majority of council members have objected to the way Robertson selected Moore, asserting that they had no input in the selection.
NEWS
August 9, 1986
William Rehnquist's supporters act as though it's dirty pool for senators to ask rude questions of their hero at Senate Judiciary Committee hearings. But the senators are just doing their job. According to the U.S. Constitution, federal judicial appointments by the president require the "advice and consent" of the Senate, and rubber-stamping appointment of so powerful an official as the chief justice of the United States would be a betrayal of the trust placed in those we have elected.
NEWS
January 26, 1989 | By Donna Shaw, Inquirer Staff Writer
A Bucks County judge has declared the position of Bristol Township solicitor vacant as of Wednesday and has given the township executive the right to choose a replacement, with the "advice and consent" of the Township Council. The opinion from Common Pleas Court Judge Oscar S. Bortner, issued Tuesday and announced yesterday, was a political victory for Township Executive Edna Roth, who has been trying to fire solicitor Donald B. McCoy since June 1986. But at a council meeting last night, a majority of the members met in closed session and decided to ask the judge to reconsider his ruling.
NEWS
August 4, 1997
"[The president] . . . by and with the advice and consent of the Senate, shall appoint ambassadors . . . " With those few words, the U.S. Constitution spells out the selection process for appointive positions in the federal government, from consuls to Supreme Court justices. But increasingly, the straightforward process of advice and consent has become a heated rhetorical war that plays out in the media, pre-empting the traditional confirmation hearing before a committee of thoughtful and deliberative senators.
NEWS
December 3, 2003
ARTICLE II of the Constitution states in part: "The President . . . shall nominate, and by and with the Advice and Consent of the Senate, shall appoint . . . Judges of the Supreme Court, and all other officers of the United States. " The current filibuster rules being used to block a vote on President Bush's judicial nominees is perverting the intention of the Framers and therefore is unconstitutional. Nothing in the Constitution or amendments requires a super-majority to bring a filibuster to closure.
NEWS
June 22, 1986 | By Garry Wills
Two misconceptions are deployed every time a nomination is made for the Supreme Court: 1. The "advice and consent" of the Senate is limited to the professional qualifications of the nominee, not to his views. 2. The President is free to appoint people congenial to his views, so long as the nominees are competent professionally. We have here a double standard, with the President able to consider ideology, and the Senate unable to. The Constitution says nothing of the standards by which either party is to act - which means, at the least, that it does not propose different standards.
NEWS
July 19, 1987 | By Michael D. Schaffer, Inquirer Staff Writer
Even as Federal Convention delegates work to devise a government to bring stability to the nation, there's unrest in Philadelphia. Reports have been confirmed that last week, while the delegates argued over how to fashion the most enlightened of governments, a scene from the Dark Ages was played out nearby. An unidentified woman, accused by her neighbors of being a witch, was dragged through the streets on July 10 by a crowd that hooted at her and pelted her before finally letting her go. The mob shouted insults at a man who tried to help the woman.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
September 6, 2005 | Richard Stengel
Richard Stengel is president and CEO of the National Constitution Center. Though dwarfed by Hurricane Katrina, confirmation hearings for John G. Roberts Jr. will be one of the most significant spectacles Washington has seen in recent years. The stakes were only raised by President Bush's nomination yesterday of Roberts to replace William H. Rehnquist as chief justice. Before hearings start, it might be useful to see if the past can be a guide to the present. In 1795, the Senate voted 14-10 to reject George Washington's nominee for chief justice, former South Carolina Gov. John Rutledge.
NEWS
December 3, 2003
ARTICLE II of the Constitution states in part: "The President . . . shall nominate, and by and with the Advice and Consent of the Senate, shall appoint . . . Judges of the Supreme Court, and all other officers of the United States. " The current filibuster rules being used to block a vote on President Bush's judicial nominees is perverting the intention of the Framers and therefore is unconstitutional. Nothing in the Constitution or amendments requires a super-majority to bring a filibuster to closure.
NEWS
October 4, 2002 | By Martin L. Haines
One day, two lawyers (Smith for the plaintiff and Jones for the defendant) stood before a Pennsylvania judge with their clients to argue an important motion that could result in the dismissal of the plaintiff's case. The plaintiff's lawyer, having learned that morning that Jones had contributed $1,000 to the judge's recent election campaign, asked Smith how much he had contributed. Smith's answer: "Nothing. " What did that lawyer think when his case was dismissed by the judge? Another Pennsylvania judge, recently elected, was faced with a case involving the right to an abortion.
NEWS
March 21, 2001 | By Vicki McClure INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Four months after Mayor Gerald Luongo lost his bid for reelection and five days after the new administration named a permanent police chief, the Appellate Division of Superior Court ruled yesterday that Luongo had the authority to name an interim police chief. A three-judge panel found that "no statute or legal principle" prohibits a mayor "from making an interim appointment within the executive branch of government. " The judges decided that the case had not been "rendered moot" by Luongo's November defeat because Mayor Randee Davidson appointed an interim chief after she took office Jan. 1. The case originated from a lawsuit filed in December 1999 by Deputy Chief James Murphy, who challenged not only his demotion to lieutenant but also Luongo's promotion of Cpl. Edmund Giordano to interim chief without the "advice and consent" of the Township Council.
NEWS
August 4, 1997
"[The president] . . . by and with the advice and consent of the Senate, shall appoint ambassadors . . . " With those few words, the U.S. Constitution spells out the selection process for appointive positions in the federal government, from consuls to Supreme Court justices. But increasingly, the straightforward process of advice and consent has become a heated rhetorical war that plays out in the media, pre-empting the traditional confirmation hearing before a committee of thoughtful and deliberative senators.
NEWS
October 17, 1991 | From Bill Tammeus, Kansas City Star
BILL'S WORLD From Bill Tammeus, Kansas City Star: Norman Mailer's new CIA epic, "Harlot's Ghost," is being widely panned. Oh, come on. It can't be much worse than the Gates hearings. "What the economy needs is a shot of confidence," says President Bush. What's the economic equivalent of invading Grenada? Midlife crisis: It's not just when you tell your kids things your folks told you but also when they reply with the same smart-aleck words you used as a kid. On Supreme Court nominees, the Senate is supposed to give advice and consent.
NEWS
June 15, 1989 | By Jeffrey Fleishman, Inquirer Staff Writer
William Carlin had made the argument so many times before that he didn't need the 7 1/2 minutes the Commonwealth Court allotted him to present his case. It took Carlin only four minutes to tell the court that Bristol Township Executive Edna Roth had the inherent power to fire township solicitor Donald B. McCoy. Citing the U.S. and Pennsylvania Constitutions, Carlin argued before the three-judge panel that "it's clear . . . (Roth) has the power to appoint and it's equally clear she has the power to dismiss.
NEWS
June 8, 1989 | By Jeffrey Fleishman, Inquirer Staff Writer
If President Bush can remove his secretary of state without congressional approval, then Bristol Township Executive Edna Roth can fire solicitor Donald B. McCoy without the consent of council. That's one of the arguments expected to be delivered tomorrow when Roth and McCoy bring their three-year legal battle before Commonwealth Court in Philadelphia. Some see the battle as a complex - possibly precedent-setting - case that will more clearly define the separation of powers between the township executive and the five-member council.
NEWS
January 26, 1989 | By Donna Shaw, Inquirer Staff Writer
A Bucks County judge has declared the position of Bristol Township solicitor vacant as of Wednesday and has given the township executive the right to choose a replacement, with the "advice and consent" of the Township Council. The opinion from Common Pleas Court Judge Oscar S. Bortner, issued Tuesday and announced yesterday, was a political victory for Township Executive Edna Roth, who has been trying to fire solicitor Donald B. McCoy since June 1986. But at a council meeting last night, a majority of the members met in closed session and decided to ask the judge to reconsider his ruling.
NEWS
January 4, 1989 | By Frank Langfitt, Special to The Inquirer
Washington Township's new council kicked off its first meeting of the year with the usual partisan wrangling last night as two Republican councilmen tried but failed to delay consent on key administrative appointments by Democratic Mayor Gerald Luongo. Despite the objections of Republican councilmen Leonard Simmons and John Rogale, the Township Council consented to the reappointment of Joseph Alacqua as township solicitor, James Devereaux as business administrator, Mark F. Fruits as head of the Department of Public Works and William Hampton as township engineer.
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