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Advisory Board

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NEWS
May 25, 1993 | by Mark McDonald, Daily News Staff Writer
For City Councilman Michael Nutter, the question is where to find just one more vote to add to the 11 who voted for his bill to establish a police advisory board. Without that 12th vote, Council will be unable to override an expected veto by Mayor Rendell. Council passed the bill last week. Rendell has been adamant in his opposition to a police advisory board, although silent on whether he will veto it. The bill proposes a 13-member advisory panel that would examine broad policy issues and allegations of police misconduct.
NEWS
August 20, 1988 | By Inga Saffron, Inquirer Staff Writer
A controversial plan at Cooper Hospital-University Medical Center that calls for an eight-story pediatric unit in Camden has received a boost from a South Jersey hospital advisory board. The Southern New Jersey Health Systems Agency, which reviews hospital construction projects, gave its blessing early yesterday morning to the $76 million addition, despite objections of several area hospitals, including West Jersey Health Systems, Inc. and Our Lady of Lourdes Medical Center. Representatives of those hospitals warned the advisory board that a large pediatric specialty unit would create a glut of hospital beds for children, in part because of the proximity to Children's Hospital of Philadelphia and St. Christopher's Hospital for Children in Philadelphia.
NEWS
September 12, 1991 | By Christine Bahls, Special to The Inquirer
The Bristol Township Council is considering the creation of an advisory board to oversee how $643,200 in federal grants is spent. The proposal, outlined at Tuesday's council work session, followed accusations that the council majority was improperly favoring a private industrial-development corporation in distributing federal money. "It's a program that would take the onus off the board and would depoliticize the system of making economic loans," said David Laustsen, the lawyer whose firm is advising the township on its Community Development program.
NEWS
September 2, 1993
After an acrimonious debate this spring over the value, wisdom and necessity of creating a police advisory board, we thought at least the verbal battle was over. Not so. You may recall that City Council overrode Mayor Rendell's veto of legislation to establish an advisory board, and that afterward Mr. Rendell said he would issue an executive order mirroring the key points in the bill. But the chief sponsor of the legislation, Councilman Michael A. Nutter, objects strenously to certain elements of the mayor's proposal.
NEWS
September 25, 1988 | By Robert DiGiacomo, Special to The Inquirer
A proposal before the Cherry Hill Township Council to create a township- wide condominium advisory board has drawn strong support from condominium association officers and a mixed reaction from council members. The proposal - which calls for an advisory board of six condominium owners, three single-family homeowners and one representative of a condominium developer - would examine common problems inherent to condominium ownership such as trash collection cost and snow removal. "In the last 15 years, Cherry Hill and other towns across the nation have faced the phenomenon of condominium ownership," said Councilman John Adler, sponsor of the bill and a condominium owner.
NEWS
March 27, 1998 | By Dwight Ott, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Despite earlier objections from the city's police chief, the Camden City Council yesterday adopted an ordinance that creates an eight-member community advisory board. The board is not meant to be a police review board, officials said, but rather a community panel that will assist police by making suggestions on ways to improve public safety. "This is not against the police department," said Councilman Ali Sloan El before Council passed the measure unanimously. "It's to help it in knowing the issues in the community.
NEWS
March 31, 1995 | By Mark Fazlollah, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER Inquirer staff writer Jeff Gammage contributed to this article
The Fraternal Order of Police filed suit against Mayor Rendell yesterday in an attempt to disband the city's year-old Police Advisory Commission, contending the mere existence of the citizens' group cripples the department. The suit focuses on the commission's first major investigation - into the Aug. 24 death of Moises DeJesus, 30, a North Philadelphia tow-truck operator. DeJesus fell into a coma after he fought with police during his arrest, and died three days later. The FOP asked for an immediate court injunction yesterday to block the commission from taking action in any cases, including the DeJesus death.
NEWS
March 8, 1992 | By Steve Boman, SPECIAL TO THE INQUIRER
Upper Makefield supervisors agreed Wednesday night to advertise for a three-person advisory board to review a controversial park and recreation plan. The plan calls for the development of a 100-acre park, five smaller neighborhood parks and a multiuse trail along the Delaware Canal. Total costs of the plan have been estimated at $5.6 million by the township's Park and Recreation Board. The creation of an advisory board angered Ron Rusk, chairman of the Park and Recreation Board.
NEWS
November 12, 1993 | By Galina Espinoza, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
In a move to placate angry residents who have opposed expansion of the Lutheran Home, representatives of the home last night told the township planning board that they would accept the establishment of a neighborhood advisory board as a condition for the plan's approval. During a 90-minute presentation before a crowd of more than 100, representatives of the home conceded that there had been "neighbor-to- neighbor' ' problems over the years. Many of those problems were then detailed by residents of the east end of town, by Zelley Avenue and Main Street, who lined up at a microphone to testify.
NEWS
September 10, 1993 | by Yvonne Latty, Daily News Staff Writer Staff writer Scott Flander contributed to this report
Hey, Mayor Rendell, some angry Puerto Ricans don't want you to march in the Puerto Rican Day Parade this month. Wilfredo Rojas, the president of National Congress of Puerto Rican Rights says if you are seen marching in the barrio on Sept. 26, the community will make you feel miserable. But he said if you really want to march, all you have to do is implement the police advisory board with subpoena power as soon as possible. The community also wants two Latinos to sit on the board.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
BUSINESS
January 13, 2016 | By Diane Mastrull, Inquirer Staff Writer
Philadelphia advertising executive Marc Brownstein has been appointed chair of the Arts & Business Council of Greater Philadelphia's advisory board to help further collaboration between the region's creative and business communities. Brownstein, president and CEO of the Brownstein Group, succeeds Ray Carballada, president and CEO of ShootersINC, a digital content firm with offices in Philadelphia and New York. Brownstein said he looks forward "to strengthening the links between creativity and workforce innovation, and helping ABC continue to develop nationally renowned programs that incorporate design thinking, employee engagement and social impact.
BUSINESS
December 29, 2015
The Pennsylvania SPCA, the advocate for animals since 1867, has elected the following board members: Mary Carroll, senior project manager at CRB; Jennifer Crawford , managing principal at Blackney Hayes Architects; Carol Erickson, former CBS3 meteorologist and anchor and reporter for Calkins Media; and Roland Kassis, founder of Kassis Ventures. The Delaware County Community Foundation , a Media nonprofit that supports charitable giving in the county through grant making, charitable vehicles, fund management, and community resources, has elected the following to its board: Ty McGillberry, a financial adviser for Wechsler Marisco Simpson; John Reilly, a vice president at 1919 Investment Co.; and Joe Saunders , retired president of Crozer Chester Medical Center.
FOOD
February 6, 2015 | By Samantha Melamed, Inquirer Staff Writer
In a kitchen on Drexel University's campus in January, notable chef/mad scientist Shola Olunloyo stood before a rapt crowd of professionals and culinary students, extolling the uses of a blast chiller. He showed off its potential for juicing strawberries ("the only other way I know is with a centrifuge"), and transforming Brie ("Any cheese can now be grated. That's what temperature allows you to do. ") The demonstration was part of the Philly Chef Conference, which, in its second year, has become a locus for networking and continuing education in the industry.
NEWS
December 31, 2014 | By Joseph N. DiStefano and Erin Arvedlund, Inquirer Staff Writers
A group of business people and professionals has assembled properties for new classrooms, a field house, a fine arts center, and parking at all-boys Roman Catholic High School so it can grow beyond its 124-year-old Gothic home at Broad and Vine Streets. Roman's backers have acquired a parcel of land behind the school from a homeless-services program, the Sunday Breakfast Association Inc. Roman will use the space to construct a field house and classrooms that will connect to the main building.
NEWS
November 15, 2013 | By Julie Zauzmer, Inquirer Staff Writer
Two days after Cardinal O'Hara High School principal Marie Rogai was abruptly fired, parents expressed frustration Wednesday at what they perceived as a lack of communication from the Archdiocese of Philadelphia. Superintendent of Secondary Schools Carol Cary told about 100 parents gathered in the school auditorium that the archdiocese felt the school needed a new leader right away. "It couldn't have waited any longer," she said. She said she would not answer any questions, but many stood up to shout questions anyway.
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