FEATURED ARTICLES
LIVING
October 11, 1995 | By Stephan Salisbury, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
It was an obscure piece of legislation, quietly tacked onto an appropriations bill at summer's end, with virtually no public debate. Now, people are clamoring, charges of forgery and malfeasance and McCarthyism are swirling, and quiet no longer reigns. The legislation would severely limit the ability of any organization or individual who receives federal grant money to engage in "political advocacy. " Republican backers of the provision claim it would end a passel of abuses they lump under the rubric of "welfare for lobbyists.
NEWS
May 31, 2012 | By Kristen A. Graham, Inquirer Staff Writer
In 1986, Shelly Yanoff accepted a job as executive director of what was then called Philadelphia Citizens for Children and Youth. She thought she would stay a few months at the organization so tiny the only employees were Yanoff and a secretary. Plans changed. Yanoff announced Tuesday that she is stepping down after 25 years as the leader of what is now known as Public Citizens for Children and Youth, an advocacy and community education nonprofit that now has 14 employees and an annual budget of about $1.3 million.
BUSINESS
April 26, 2008 | By Jane M. Von Bergen INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
In the five years since her husband drowned on the job, Holly Shaw has had plenty of time for tears. Plenty of time to try to shield the children. Plenty of time to ponder the what-ifs and what-could-have-beens, like what would have happened if her husband had been wearing a life jacket. Those times, now, are over, though the memory is not. Because, these days, Holly Shaw wants to make sure no other family experiences what hers did. That's why yesterday, at the annual Workers' Memorial Day remembrance for those who died on the job, Shaw, a schoolteacher from South Philadelphia, announced the formation of a support and advocacy group created by and for the families of those whose relatives went to work and never came home.
BUSINESS
December 16, 2010 | By Maria Panaritis, Inquirer Staff Writer
It is the lifeblood of the political world: advocacy . And for the former lawmaker now heading the Greater Philadelphia Chamber of Commerce, it is becoming a bigger part of the job description. Since taking over as president and chief executive officer of the nonprofit business group 16 months ago, Rob Wonderling has expanded the chamber's political-advocacy agenda, seeing it as essential given the tough economic conditions of the day. Untangling persistently logjammed Route 422 - and the possibility of turning it into a toll road - is one of the initiatives the 11-county group has embraced since Wonderling joined the chamber in August 2009.
NEWS
April 8, 2001 | By Susan Weidener INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
The League of Women Voters is more than a group of women that studies government or registers new voters after naturalization ceremonies. It is a group that also studies issues and takes stands on the environment, health care and international relations. A nonpartisan political organization, the League of Women Voters, through regional meetings, online dialogues and written reports, is currently evaluating, for example, what governments have done to fulfill the commitments made at the Beijing World Conference on Women in 1995 to improve the status of women and girls.
NEWS
June 23, 1998 | by Marc Meltzer, Daily News Staff Writer
Parkside and Frankford may be on different sides of town, but they have one thing in common: community-based organizations whose commitment to their neighborhoods runs far and deep. While many Philadelphia neighborhoods are blessed with vigorous advocacy organizations, Parkside and Frankford are home to groups that are engaged in an almost endless variety of activities. Lucinda Hudson, president of Parkside Association of Philadelphia, says Parkside's future means "we're going to be fully redeveloped.
NEWS
September 13, 1989 | By Hank Klibanoff, Inquirer Staff Writer
Know that feeling you get when you drop your pen, bend down, pick it up, drop your glasses, bend down, pick them up, drop your keys, bend down, pick them up, and drop your pen again? Walking in Philadelphia can be like that. Every sense is affected, every nerve irritated, and you feel alternating currents of exhilaration and exhaustion. You cross the street to avoid the grizzled man with the colander on his head; tighten your shoulders and walk alongside a Center City building, wrinkling your nose at a sour smell; turn a corner and run mug-to-mug into another startled pedestrian who hugged the corner to avoid the five people clogged in front of a vending cart.
NEWS
November 24, 1995 | By Angela Paik, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
A measure that almost made it to Congress' bill reopening the government this week may resurface yet, and it has area nonprofit organizations more than a little uneasy. The measure, known as the Istook Amendment, would prohibit nonprofit organizations that receive federal money from spending more than 5 percent of their nonfederal dollars on political advocacy - a broadly interpreted term that could include all kinds of government contact and public education efforts. Proponents call the idea an attack on "welfare for lobbyists" - an attempt to end abuses by nonprofits - but others say it is an assault by the Republican-controlled Congress on organizations that use federal money to provide social services.
NEWS
March 19, 1993 | By Dale Mezzacappa, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Commonwealth Court Judge Doris Smith yesterday allowed three groups representing parents and advocacy organizations to intervene in the school district's long-running desegregation case, saying that she hoped the action would silence politicians trying to stir up fears of mandatory busing. "We finally have the voices of parents and other interested parties before the court," Smith said. "Hopefully, we can now resolve this matter. We hope to see an end to the efforts of certain politicians in this city who have used this case for their own political agenda.
NEWS
December 24, 2005 | By Adam Fifield INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A children's advocacy group's request that New Jersey's child-welfare system be handed over to a court-appointed receiver is unwarranted and "fundamentally flawed," the state said yesterday. On Dec. 1, Manhattan-based Children's Rights Inc. asked a federal judge to turn over the state's child-welfare system to U.S. Sen. Jon Corzine, who takes over the governor's office in January. The organization had accused the state of contempt, saying the current leadership had failed to make adequate progress under a 2003 court settlement mandating an overhaul of its child-welfare system.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
June 3, 2015 | Wendy Ruderman, Daily News Staff Writer
IT'S SUNDAY about 7 p.m., a time when most people try to wring out that last drip of relaxation before the start of another workweek. Nope. Not the high-octane "Jim Kenney for Mayor" team. Instead of kicking back, Kenney's campaign spokeswoman, Lauren Hitt, was at her computer, alerting the media to a clean-water advocacy event: "Kenney joins representatives from the EPA, Philadelphia Water Department and PennEnvironment to discuss new, historic clean water protections for Philadelphia.
NEWS
May 14, 2015 | Chris Brennan, Inquirer Staff Writer
Add another independent expenditure (IE) group to the mix in the final week of the Democratic primary campaign for mayor of Philadelphia. A new nonprofit, Leadership Matters Inc., is expected to start airing commercials Wednesday. Former City Councilman James F. Kenney, the front-runner in Tuesday's election, appears to be the group's target. The group was registered with the Pennsylvania Department of State last week by Chris Lapetina, a Democratic political consultant with a firm in Washington.
NEWS
May 4, 2015 | By Jeremy Roebuck, Inquirer Staff Writer
LAYTON, Utah - There are days when Aaron Fisher believes he has finally put the past behind him. Days when his chief concerns are the new friends he met at a party or a truck axle he snapped during an off-roading trip in the foothills of the Allegheny Mountains. Days when he hardly gives a thought to the aging man he helped put in a prison cell hundreds of miles away. But those days tend to be fleeting. Even now, Fisher is still growing up in Jerry Sandusky's shadow. Seven years ago, Fisher, then a scared 15-year-old, publicly accused the former Pennsylvania State University assistant coach of sexual abuse, launching an investigation that would shake the state and its flagship college to its core.
NEWS
May 1, 2015 | By Caitlin McCabe, Inquirer Staff Writer
Two weeks ago, a child who was sexually abused in Delaware County was shuffled from sterile office to sterile office as police, then prosecutors, and then social workers all asked the child to recount the incident. That was standard procedure, and one that often further traumatized child victims, experts say. But now, a victim will have to tell that story only once. On Tuesday, Delaware County dedicated a Children's Advocacy Center in Media that will serve as a child-friendly setting in which investigators and social workers can coordinate responses to child-sex-abuse cases.
NEWS
April 28, 2015 | By Angelo Fichera, Inquirer Staff Writer
A school-choice advocacy group in Philadelphia will roll out on Monday the first of a planned series of television advertisements to promote its cause as voters consider whom to support in the mayor's race. Mike Wang, executive director of Philadelphia School Advocacy Partners, said his organization intended to spend more than $1 million on television ads in the coming months, much of it after the May 19 primary. "This is about getting every child access to a great school," Wang said, adding that the group would spend "whatever it will take to do that.
NEWS
March 6, 2015 | By Michael Matza, Inquirer Staff Writer
The reintroduction of a Pennsylvania bill that would bar undocumented immigrants from state and federal benefits is again drawing fire from immigrant advocacy groups. They contend the legislation would cost the state $20 million to verify what it already knows - that Pennsylvania immigrants are not illegally accessing public benefits. The bill, introduced by Sen. Patrick Stefano (R., Fayette) with 19 co-sponsors, recently passed the Senate and went to the House, where it awaits action in the state government committee.
NEWS
January 16, 2015 | BY MORGAN ZALOT, Daily News Staff Writer zalotm@phillynews.com, 215-854-5928
DECADES AGO - before houses sprang up between his block of 12th Street and Broad Street - Wes Hatton used the open space in his North Philadelphia neighborhood to teach his daughter and her friend Kim Jones how to ride bikes. Hatton, who has lived on 12th Street near Jefferson for 55 years, knew Jones all her life. He can't grasp the fact that someone killed her Tuesday morning, firing a single bullet into the back of her skull just steps from Hatton's and Jones' side-by-side rowhouses.
NEWS
January 15, 2015 | BY MORGAN ZALOT, Daily News Staff Writer zalotm@phillynews.com, 215-854-5928
FOR KIM JONES, life was about caring for others. The mother spent the last several years working at an organization that helps abused and neglected children. But with the pull of a trigger yesterday morning - a single bullet fired into the dedicated child-advocacy worker's head as she went off to work - that was all gone. Police said Jones, 56, left her North Philadelphia home about 9 a.m. and walked less than a block to a bus stop at 12th and Jefferson streets, just as she had each day for several years on her way to her job at Center City-based Turning Points for Children.
NEWS
November 7, 2014 | BY REGINA MEDINA, Daily News Staff Writer medinar@phillynews.com, 215-854-5985
THE EDUCATION advocacy group Alliance for Philadelphia Public Schools has taken legal steps to challenge the School Reform Commission's decision last month to cancel the teachers' contract. Retired teacher Lisa Haver, a member of the alliance, alleges the SRC was "in clear violation" of the state's Sunshine Law when it called the Oct. 6 meeting to impose conditions on the Philadelphia Federation of Teachers. The action would have forced PFT members to begin paying for health-care benefits next month, but subsequent filings by the district and the PFT has stayed the decision.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 25, 2014 | By Samantha Melamed, Inquirer Staff Writer
As with anything involving small children, the monthly Kidical Mass Philadelphia bike ride was running behind schedule on a recent Saturday morning. But before it could get underway, a precautionary pit stop was necessary. "That is true Kidical Mass style," said Dena Driscoll, 30, with a laugh. "Bringing the Ikea potty with you is something that always happens. " Anything goes at this monthly family biking event, which Driscoll brought to Philadelphia two years ago as a way to build a community of parents and kids who can ride safely together.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
|
|
|
|
|