FEATURED ARTICLES
LIVING
October 11, 1995 | By Stephan Salisbury, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
It was an obscure piece of legislation, quietly tacked onto an appropriations bill at summer's end, with virtually no public debate. Now, people are clamoring, charges of forgery and malfeasance and McCarthyism are swirling, and quiet no longer reigns. The legislation would severely limit the ability of any organization or individual who receives federal grant money to engage in "political advocacy. " Republican backers of the provision claim it would end a passel of abuses they lump under the rubric of "welfare for lobbyists.
NEWS
May 31, 2012 | By Kristen A. Graham, Inquirer Staff Writer
In 1986, Shelly Yanoff accepted a job as executive director of what was then called Philadelphia Citizens for Children and Youth. She thought she would stay a few months at the organization so tiny the only employees were Yanoff and a secretary. Plans changed. Yanoff announced Tuesday that she is stepping down after 25 years as the leader of what is now known as Public Citizens for Children and Youth, an advocacy and community education nonprofit that now has 14 employees and an annual budget of about $1.3 million.
NEWS
January 29, 2016 | By Andrew Maykuth, STAFF WRITER
Developers and potential customers of small modular reactors (SMR) have formed an advocacy group called SMR Start to promote public policy to accelerate the adoption of advanced nuclear reactors. The founding members of the consortium include PSEG Nuclear, which operates large a three-reactor complex in Salem County, and Holtec International, the Marlton energy company that is building a research center in Camden to support the development of its small modular reactor, the SMR-160.
BUSINESS
April 26, 2008 | By Jane M. Von Bergen INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
In the five years since her husband drowned on the job, Holly Shaw has had plenty of time for tears. Plenty of time to try to shield the children. Plenty of time to ponder the what-ifs and what-could-have-beens, like what would have happened if her husband had been wearing a life jacket. Those times, now, are over, though the memory is not. Because, these days, Holly Shaw wants to make sure no other family experiences what hers did. That's why yesterday, at the annual Workers' Memorial Day remembrance for those who died on the job, Shaw, a schoolteacher from South Philadelphia, announced the formation of a support and advocacy group created by and for the families of those whose relatives went to work and never came home.
BUSINESS
December 16, 2010 | By Maria Panaritis, Inquirer Staff Writer
It is the lifeblood of the political world: advocacy . And for the former lawmaker now heading the Greater Philadelphia Chamber of Commerce, it is becoming a bigger part of the job description. Since taking over as president and chief executive officer of the nonprofit business group 16 months ago, Rob Wonderling has expanded the chamber's political-advocacy agenda, seeing it as essential given the tough economic conditions of the day. Untangling persistently logjammed Route 422 - and the possibility of turning it into a toll road - is one of the initiatives the 11-county group has embraced since Wonderling joined the chamber in August 2009.
NEWS
April 8, 2001 | By Susan Weidener INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
The League of Women Voters is more than a group of women that studies government or registers new voters after naturalization ceremonies. It is a group that also studies issues and takes stands on the environment, health care and international relations. A nonpartisan political organization, the League of Women Voters, through regional meetings, online dialogues and written reports, is currently evaluating, for example, what governments have done to fulfill the commitments made at the Beijing World Conference on Women in 1995 to improve the status of women and girls.
NEWS
June 23, 1998 | by Marc Meltzer, Daily News Staff Writer
Parkside and Frankford may be on different sides of town, but they have one thing in common: community-based organizations whose commitment to their neighborhoods runs far and deep. While many Philadelphia neighborhoods are blessed with vigorous advocacy organizations, Parkside and Frankford are home to groups that are engaged in an almost endless variety of activities. Lucinda Hudson, president of Parkside Association of Philadelphia, says Parkside's future means "we're going to be fully redeveloped.
NEWS
September 13, 1989 | By Hank Klibanoff, Inquirer Staff Writer
Know that feeling you get when you drop your pen, bend down, pick it up, drop your glasses, bend down, pick them up, drop your keys, bend down, pick them up, and drop your pen again? Walking in Philadelphia can be like that. Every sense is affected, every nerve irritated, and you feel alternating currents of exhilaration and exhaustion. You cross the street to avoid the grizzled man with the colander on his head; tighten your shoulders and walk alongside a Center City building, wrinkling your nose at a sour smell; turn a corner and run mug-to-mug into another startled pedestrian who hugged the corner to avoid the five people clogged in front of a vending cart.
NEWS
November 24, 1995 | By Angela Paik, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
A measure that almost made it to Congress' bill reopening the government this week may resurface yet, and it has area nonprofit organizations more than a little uneasy. The measure, known as the Istook Amendment, would prohibit nonprofit organizations that receive federal money from spending more than 5 percent of their nonfederal dollars on political advocacy - a broadly interpreted term that could include all kinds of government contact and public education efforts. Proponents call the idea an attack on "welfare for lobbyists" - an attempt to end abuses by nonprofits - but others say it is an assault by the Republican-controlled Congress on organizations that use federal money to provide social services.
NEWS
March 19, 1993 | By Dale Mezzacappa, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Commonwealth Court Judge Doris Smith yesterday allowed three groups representing parents and advocacy organizations to intervene in the school district's long-running desegregation case, saying that she hoped the action would silence politicians trying to stir up fears of mandatory busing. "We finally have the voices of parents and other interested parties before the court," Smith said. "Hopefully, we can now resolve this matter. We hope to see an end to the efforts of certain politicians in this city who have used this case for their own political agenda.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
August 25, 2016 | By Julia Terruso, Staff Writer
Philadelphia's ban on noncommercial advertisements at the airport - sparked by one it rejected calling for prison reform - is unconstitutional, a federal appeals court ruled in a decision published Tuesday. The NAACP, in conjunction with the American Civil Liberties Union of Pennsylvania, filed a lawsuit in 2011 claiming the city's rejection of an NAACP ad violated the group's First Amendment rights. The ad, which was to be placed in the international arrivals section of Philadelphia International Airport, read: "Welcome to America, home to 5% of the world's people & 25% of the world's prisoners.
NEWS
May 3, 2016 | By Samantha Melamed, Staff Writer
FOR A HUNDRED or so activists who crowded into tents to escape the rain Sunday afternoon, the May Day U.S.A. March, Rally and Family Celebration at Clark Park in West Philadelphia was a chance to speak out on issues from the Verizon workers' strike to the perils of gentrification to the need for a $15 minimum wage. But for the handful of kids amid the sodden crowd, it was all about the face painting. The stars and cat whiskers were courtesy of the Philly Childcare Collective, an eight-year-old grassroots organization that provides free child care for social and economic justice movements powered by low-income and minority activists.
BUSINESS
April 16, 2016 | By Diane Mastrull, Staff Writer
A Pennsylvania nonprofit, nonpartisan, entrepreneur-driven advocacy group is expected to launch July 1 with the outgoing president and CEO of the Commonwealth Foundation, Matthew J. Brouillette, at its helm. Commonwealth Partners Chamber of Entrepreneurs will consist of entrepreneurs and philanthropists "working in partnership to advance better public policies in Pennsylvania," according to an announcement issued Thursday. Brouillette's term at the Commonwealth Foundation, a think tank in Harrisburg that advocates fiscally conservative and libertarian public policies, will end June 30. The new agency he will lead, also to be based in Harrisburg, will work to advance public policies in Pennsylvania, educate the public regarding laws and policies, and advocate for legislation to improve economic and educational opportunities for every resident of the state, according to the statement.
NEWS
February 16, 2016
ISSUE | HEALTH CARE Protect professionals By a vote of 177-0, Pennsylvania's House of Representatives sent a message Wednesday that more can be done to protect the state's health-care workers from assault during the performance of their jobs. House Bill 1219 adds health-care professionals to a protected class of individuals in cases of assault. Sponsored by Rep. Judy Ward (R., Blair), the bill raises the penalty from a second-degree misdemeanor to a felony. Nearly 60 percent of nonfatal assaults and violent acts occur in the health-care and social-assistance industry.
NEWS
January 29, 2016 | By Andrew Maykuth, STAFF WRITER
Developers and potential customers of small modular reactors (SMR) have formed an advocacy group called SMR Start to promote public policy to accelerate the adoption of advanced nuclear reactors. The founding members of the consortium include PSEG Nuclear, which operates large a three-reactor complex in Salem County, and Holtec International, the Marlton energy company that is building a research center in Camden to support the development of its small modular reactor, the SMR-160.
NEWS
October 30, 2015 | By Aubrey Whelan, Inquirer Staff Writer
Deputy Commissioner Kevin A. Bethel, one of the highest-ranking members of the Philadelphia Police Department, will retire in January to join an advocacy group that focuses on youth violence prevention. Bethel, a 29-year member of the force, runs patrol operations and is known as a strong proponent of community-oriented policing tactics. His name was among those floated as a possible replacement for Commissioner Charles H. Ramsey, who is retiring in January. Ramsey said working with Bethel was a "joy," and called his work for the department "immeasurable.
NEWS
October 15, 2015 | BY REGINA MEDINA, Daily News Staff Writer medinar@phillynews.com, 215-854-5985
A LOCAL GROUP of education advocates has sent Gov. Wolf a letter asking for the removal of Farah Jimenez from the School Reform Commission because of her husband's association with charter schools. The Alliance for Philadelphia Public Schools says it is also concerned about Jimenez's oversight of the school district's Charter School Office, which she details on her LinkedIn page. The group alleges in an Oct. 8 letter obtained by the Daily News that Jimenez, who was appointed to the SRC in February 2014 by former Gov. Tom Corbett, "has taken actions which raise additional problems with her continuing as a Commissioner.
BUSINESS
September 11, 2015 | By Jane M. Von Bergen, Inquirer Staff Writer
Uber's billboards promised opportunities to earn $25 to $30 an hour, so Takele Gobena quit his $9-an-hour job at the Seattle airport, borrowed money to buy a car, and began working as a driver for Uber and Lyft. "We're not earning a living wage," Gobena said. After expenses, he said, he wound up earning $2.64 an hour, not enough to cover car payments or support his infant daughter. Gobena served as Exhibit A on Wednesday as advocates for low-wage workers released a report about problems and possible solutions for a growing class of workers such as Gobena in what is known as the on-demand economy.
NEWS
August 26, 2015 | BY REGINA MEDINA, Daily News Staff Writer, medinar@phillynews.com, 215-854-5985
WHEN BARBARA Galarza was told by a high school psychologist last year that her teen daughter had "intellectual disabilities," she began to "cry, cry, cry. " She still had another surprise coming. The non-bilingual psychologist told her, "Don't worry, it's better this way. She'll get a lot of benefits," Galarza recalled yesterday in an interview conducted in Spanish. "She was heartless. " "Nobody would want news like that. It's not logical," she said. "For me that's not normal, [to]
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