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BUSINESS
March 22, 2015 | By David Sell, Inquirer Staff Writer
Transicoil, L.L.C., which makes aerospace instruments in Collegeville, Montgomery County, is in the process of laying off 50 employees because one product line is being shifted to a "sister company" in Wichita, Kan. As required by the federal Worker Adjustment and Retraining Notification Act, Transicoil sent a letter to the Pennsylvania Department of Labor and Industry of regarding the permanent layoffs. The letter said the first of the 50 layoffs was to occur March 13. Four other employees have been notified they will lose their jobs between March 27 and May 9. "The remaining 45 employees will be separated at a date in the future which has not yet been determined," according to the company letter, dated March 13. Transicoil officials could not be reached for comment Friday evening.
NEWS
March 15, 2010 | By Sally A. Downey INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Charles Barry Albert, 75, formerly of Malvern, a General Electric aerospace engineer and sailing enthusiast, died of brain cancer Feb. 26 at home in St. Michaels, Md. For more than 40 years, Mr. Albert was a test engineer at GE aerospace facilities in Philadelphia and Valley Forge. He was involved in several NASA projects, including Skylab, the Landsat satellite, and the Pioneer Venus spacecraft. He retired from GE in 1998 but continued to consult. Mr. Albert grew up in Stroudsburg, Pa. He began working for GE while earning a bachelor's degree in electrical engineering from Pennsylvania State University.
NEWS
March 22, 2012
Sanford "Sandy" McDonnell, 89, who led the aerospace behemoth McDonnell Douglas Corp., has died, according to Boeing Co., which bought McDonnell Douglas in 1997. Mr. McDonnell, McDonnell Douglas' former chairman and chief executive officer, had been diagnosed with pancreatic cancer in November 2010 and died Monday at his home in Clayton, Mo., the St. Louis Post-Dispatch reported. Mr. McDonnell, the nephew of McDonnell Aircraft founder James McDonnell, was CEO from 1972 and became chairman eight years later after his uncle's death.
NEWS
February 5, 1987 | By Lisa Ellis, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Lavelle Aircraft Co. will move its plant, with 150 employees, from Newtown in Bucks County to the Red Lion Industrial Park in Northeast Philadelphia, president Richard Ludwig said this week. The company, which manufactures sheet-metal parts for the aerospace industry, will move into the Peabody & Wind Engineering Co. plant at 275 Geiger Rd. by early summer, he said. According to a draft agreement between the companies, completion of the $1.85 million sale will take place between April 30 and July 1. The plant, covering 86,000 square feet on an eight-acre site, will require little renovation to house Lavelle operations, Ludwig said.
NEWS
April 22, 1998 | By Herb Drill, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
John A. Tlush, 89, the retired founder and treasurer of an aerospace parts company, died Sunday at the Artman Lutheran Home in Ambler. He had resided in Jenkintown for 48 years before moving to the home four years ago. Mr. Tlush was born in Newark, N.J., where he graduated from high school and attended Newark College of Engineering. He joined Bendix Aviation Corp. in 1930 as a production engineer, then transferred to the firm's aviation electric motor division in Philadelphia, where he was a production supervisor from 1940 to 1946.
NEWS
May 28, 2013 | By Susan Snyder, Inquirer Staff Writer
When Princeton University seniors Aman Sinha and Amelia Bensch-Schaus were summoned to the dean's office, they both wondered: What did they do wrong? "It's sort of like being called down to the principal's office," Sinha said. "It's either something really good or something really bad. " It turned out to be something really, really good. Sinha, a mechanical and aerospace engineering major, was named valedictorian of the 2013 graduating class, and Bensch-Schaus, a classics major, was salutatorian.
BUSINESS
February 17, 1987 | By Larry Fish, Inquirer Staff Writer
General Electric Co. said yesterday that about 120 of the 2,800 employees at its aerospace facility in Valley Forge would be laid off within 30 days because of increased competition for a reduced amount of government contracts. The 120 employees include engineers, technicians and support personnel, said Shirley L. Ross, senior specialist in communications at the GE plant, which is known formally as the Astro-Space Division's Spacecraft Operations - Valley Forge. "Aerospace is going through a transition period right now - into an era of rather dramatic transformation," because of "tighter budgets" by the Department of Defense and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration , Ross said.
NEWS
May 14, 2010
Edward Uhl, 92, who helped invent the bazooka during World War II and later led the aerospace company Fairchild Industries Inc., died Sunday in Oxford, Md., of complications from a stroke he suffered three years earlier. In 1942, as an Army first lieutenant with an engineering degree, Mr. Uhl helped develop a shoulder-fired rocket launcher nicknamed the bazooka because it resembled a tube-shaped musical instrument. He joined Fairchild as president in 1961. He oversaw its transformation from a military aircraft manufacturer to an aerospace giant before retiring as chairman in 1985.
BUSINESS
January 20, 1990 | By Marian Uhlman, Inquirer Staff Writer
Hercules Inc. yesterday said troubles in its aerospace division had prompted it to set up a $323 million reserve that will result in an overall financial loss for the year. The Wilmington chemical and aerospace firm said the problems were rooted in three programs related to missile development. Hercules makes the solid-rocket propellent for the three Defense Department programs. Two involve space-launch vehicles for large satellites - the Titan IV solid-rocket motor upgrade and the Delta II graphite epoxy motor.
NEWS
October 5, 1993 | by Jim Smith, Daily News Staff Writer
A nuts and bolts dealer and his company have agreed to plead guilty to fraud charges and to forfeit more than $2.2 million to federal prosecutors in Philadelphia for cheating hundreds of customers, including the U.S. military. Under the plea bargain, David D'Lorenzo, 39, owner of American Precision Components, of Farmingdale, N.Y., also will go to prison for "more than a few years," said his New York lawyer, Louis Rosenthal, after prosecutors filed charges aginst D'Lorenzo and the company in U.S. District Court here.
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BUSINESS
March 22, 2015 | By David Sell, Inquirer Staff Writer
Transicoil, L.L.C., which makes aerospace instruments in Collegeville, Montgomery County, is in the process of laying off 50 employees because one product line is being shifted to a "sister company" in Wichita, Kan. As required by the federal Worker Adjustment and Retraining Notification Act, Transicoil sent a letter to the Pennsylvania Department of Labor and Industry of regarding the permanent layoffs. The letter said the first of the 50 layoffs was to occur March 13. Four other employees have been notified they will lose their jobs between March 27 and May 9. "The remaining 45 employees will be separated at a date in the future which has not yet been determined," according to the company letter, dated March 13. Transicoil officials could not be reached for comment Friday evening.
NEWS
November 16, 2014 | By Walter F. Naedele, Inquirer Staff Writer
Edward G. Carideo Sr., 83, of Cinnaminson, a former director of ethics at the Ford Aerospace unit in Willow Grove, died of complications from Parkinson's disease on Tuesday, Nov. 11, at the Wiley Christian Retirement Community in Marlton. At one point, Mr. Carideo and several friends established the Martin Luther King Jr. Day Care Center in Camden, son Matthew said. Born in Philadelphia, Mr. Carideo graduated from St. Thomas More High School there and earned a bachelor's at St. Joseph's University.
NEWS
October 2, 2014 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
Leonard Markowitz, 86, of Huntingdon Valley, a chemist and later an aerospace engineer, died Monday, Sept. 29, at the Vitas Hospice at Nazareth Hospital of complications from a recent fall. Mr. Markowitz grew up in West Philadelphia and Wynnefield, and lived in the Philadelphia area all his life. He received his bachelor's and master's degrees from Temple University, where he majored in chemistry and minored in history. Mr. Markowitz worked in various capacities with Thiokol Chemical Corp., Radio Corp.
NEWS
June 26, 2013 | By Tara Nurin, NJ SPOTLIGHT
Joint Base McGuire-Dix-Lakehurst contributes $7 billion annually to the South Jersey economy. It's not just the largest employer in the region, it's the No. 2 employer in the state - second only to the state itself. But New Jersey's defense industry is far more than just the joint base. And those working to maximize its impact on the state economy say it's essential to leverage existing infrastructure and talent in the face of impending cuts to the federal defense budget. They also say it's crucial to increase profits and jobs in conjunction with New Jersey's uniquely positioned aerospace industry.
NEWS
May 28, 2013 | By Susan Snyder, Inquirer Staff Writer
When Princeton University seniors Aman Sinha and Amelia Bensch-Schaus were summoned to the dean's office, they both wondered: What did they do wrong? "It's sort of like being called down to the principal's office," Sinha said. "It's either something really good or something really bad. " It turned out to be something really, really good. Sinha, a mechanical and aerospace engineering major, was named valedictorian of the 2013 graduating class, and Bensch-Schaus, a classics major, was salutatorian.
NEWS
May 14, 2013 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
Robert Raymond Moser, 86, an aerospace engineer for General Electric, died Thursday, May 2, of pneumonia at the nursing skilled facility at Shannondell in Audubon. Mr. Moser's first job was as a design engineer for Baldwin-Lima-Hamilton Corp. in the mid-1950s. A longtime friend referred Mr. Moser to General Electric, where he worked from July 1956 until retiring in 1990. Sometimes his office was in Philadelphia; at other times, in King of Prussia. His family said that engineering was a passion for Mr. Moser and that he was "loyal and passionate about the company that employed him" for so many years.
NEWS
May 9, 2013 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON, Daily News Staff Writer morrisj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5573
IF THAT BROKEN thing had wheels or moving parts or plugged into an electrical socket, Charlie Tagg could fix it. It didn't matter if it was a car, a TV set, a radio or toy train, his daughter Chris Jakielaszek said. "Dad found enjoyment tinkering and fixing a wide variety of items," she said. "He liked the challenge of making something work again and helping someone. He never charged anyone for the work he did. " Charles W. Tagg, a retired aerospace and aviation engineer, died April 29 of a heart ailment.
BUSINESS
January 19, 2013
Aircraft parts maker Triumph Group Inc., of Berwyn, said it agreed to acquire Goodrich Pump & Engine Control Systems from United Technologies Corp. for an undisclosed amount. Triumph said the acquisition will add about $195 million in annual revenue, and will operate as Triumph Engine Control Systems L.L.C. The business, which supplies aerospace fuel systems, is located in West Hartford, Conn. It employs 530. The deal is expected to close in the current quarter, Triumph said.
NEWS
November 21, 2012 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
Jack J. Rudnick, 86, of Devon, a science and math whiz who worked as an aerospace engineer for more than 30 years, died of congestive heart failure at his home Sunday, Nov. 18. Born in Philadelphia and raised in the Wynnefield section, Mr. Rudnick graduated in 1942 from Overbrook High School and earned a bachelor's degree in science from the University of Pennsylvania by age 19. In 1946, Mr. Rudnick completed a master's degree in science and engineering...
NEWS
June 28, 2012 | By W.J. Hennigan, Los Angeles Times
LOS ANGELES - The nation's military contractors say they are preparing to shut facilities, tear up supplier contracts, and issue pink slips to thousands of aerospace employees to deal with proposed federal budget cuts threatening to hit Pentagon spending. After a decade of heady growth amid the military buildup following 9/11, contractors had already braced themselves for $487 billion in cuts over the next decade. But an additional $500 billion in cuts are now being discussed in Washington.
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