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Aesthetics

NEWS
July 25, 2003 | By Amy S. Rosenberg INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Maybe it's the new mayor, riding into office on a mission to make the beach potty friendly, and a city commissioner sidekick who wants to wangle some choice parking spots for the common sunbather. Or maybe it is just the new Starbucks, which seems in just two weeks to have made this whole beach town a little over-caffeinated. Whatever. Between a fight over beach-block parking and the imminent arrival of Porta-Potties, things in tony Margate have become a bit, shall we say, edgy.
NEWS
December 26, 2004 | By Jan Hefler INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
It seems to capture the very moment when the dawn explodes into ripples of brilliant oranges and yellows, dwarfing grainy mountains and swatches of a royal blue sky. Where did the photographer find such an ethereal place? But appearances deceive. This is no hidden paradise one can visit. It's a grain of the common painkiller acetaminophen played against a bit of Vitamin C, of all things. The photographer, Edy Kieser of Switzerland, stumbled into its aura while gazing into a microscope.
NEWS
September 7, 2000 | By Lauren Mayk and Leonard N. Fleming, INQUIRER STAFF WRITERS
Planners have decided that, when it comes to reinventing the depressed Route 130 corridor, looks count. After years of talking about industry and economics, the Burlington County freeholders, Delaware Valley Regional Planning Commission, and state Department of Transportation are embarking on a study of the aesthetics of the corridor. The study, expected to cost the Department of Transportation more than $300,000, is to recommend ways to improve the appearance of Route 130 where it passes through seven municipalities.
NEWS
May 25, 1986 | By Nicole Brodeur, Special to The Inquirer
A crowded primary ballot illustrates the high interest in the race for two three-year terms on the Hainesport Township Committee. Of the five candidates, three are Republicans. In the GOP race, two incumbents, Charles W. Gray and Michael J. McMullen Sr., are facing a challenge by a newcomer, John Carnuccio. Although the two Democratic candidates will be unopposed on June 3, both are eagerly awaiting the campaign for the November election. Gray, 56, of Route 38, a technician for New Jersey Bell, is completing his first, three-year term.
NEWS
August 27, 1997 | By Christian Davenport, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Even though the 70,000-square-foot high school addition is almost a foot lower than the building it is supposed to join, there won't be any structural or aesthetic problems that cannot be fixed, the project's architect says. But some residents are not convinced and continue to question the credibility and competence of those involved. At a special school board meeting Monday, held about a month after the board was first told that the addition sits 11 5/8 inches below the main building, Scott Malin, the architect, outlined some steps that he said would remedy the error.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 23, 1994 | By Carrie Rickey, INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
By now, 60 years since Hitler's rise to power and approximately half a century (and 3,628 Discovery Channel documentaries) since his fall, it would seem that the Fuhrer and his Third Reich had been examined from every angle imaginable. Yet in rethinking Hitler as a frustrated artist, architect and kitsch opera librettist, The Architecture of Doom provides a new - and profoundly enlightening - twist to this supremely twisted figure. In the view of Swedish filmmaker Peter Cohen's documentary, Hitler's application of aesthetics to bioengineering laid the foundation for the Nazi genocide machine.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 4, 1988 | By Steven Rea, Inquirer Staff Writer
You say you want a birdhouse with a winged serpent coiled around it? You say you want an armoire crawling with coyotes and rattlesnakes? You say you want a wall-clock festooned with cows and corn? (You actually say "festooned"?) Or an art-deco gas stove that looks as if it's ready for intergalactic flight? Or a Day of the Dead diorama? A Partridge Family lunch box? A bolt of 1950s geometric-patterned upholstery fabric? A candelabrum embaubled in charms? The complete cast of Rocky and Bullwinkle (yes, Mr. Peabody and Dudley Do-Right, too)
ENTERTAINMENT
October 11, 2002 | By Edward J. Sozanski INQUIRER ART CRITIC
It's flashback time again at the Seraphin Gallery, where California assemblage artist George Herms is showing constructions that span nearly 50 years. Herms' sculptures, many dating from the last decade, are classic in being created from obviously cast-off junk, from rusty license plates to old shoes. This process is supposed to be transformative, to demonstrate that just about any dross can be invested with aesthetic value. This was a radical strategy when Kurt Schwitters was pasting together used bus tickets in the 1920s, and it was still provocative when Robert Rauschenberg stuck real objects onto his "combine" paintings in the mid-1950s, about the time Herms began to work.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 5, 1998 | By Desmond Ryan, INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
In his best-known poem, "The Ballad of Reading Gaol," Oscar Wilde declared that "each man kills the thing he loves. " In his own flamboyant life and tragic death, the reverse turned out to be true. The price society exacted from Wilde for his passionate love for Lord Alfred Douglas is the natural dramatic focus of any screen biography. The playwright and wit was well served in the '60s by Robert Morley in Oscar Wilde and Peter Finch in The Trials of Oscar Wilde. Brian Gilbert's Wilde is superior to both the earlier efforts and not just because it takes advantage of the greater sexual candor now possible and even expected in movies.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 20, 1998 | By Edward J. Sozanski, INQUIRER ART CRITIC
Yong Soon Min's exhibition at Temple Gallery, "Bridge of No Return," addresses 50 years of divided nationhood and all its personal and public ramifications. The nation is Korea, and the package of layered symbolism that Min has created to represent various aspects of the partition will challenge even those viewers who know something of Korea's recent history. Formally partitioned in 1948, Korea is the Cold War's last battleground. The two Korean states, North and South, are implacably hostile to one another, so the separation remains absolute.
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