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Aetna

BUSINESS
January 29, 2012 | By Stacey Burling, Inquirer Staff Writer
Up to 10,000 Aetna subscribers are caught in the middle of a contract fight between the insurance company and a 19-member cardiology group that says it provides most of the heart care at Abington Memorial Hospital. Negotiation battles between hospitals or doctors and insurers that go down to the wire - and beyond it - have become more common in recent years as insurance companies have faced more pressure from subscribers and employers to curb costs. The contract between Aetna and Abington Medical Specialists (AMS)
NEWS
August 13, 2003 | By Brian Newbert
Being a quadriplegic insured by Aetna, I can understand why one of the nation's largest managed-care firms recently settled for $170 million a class-action lawsuit filed by physicians. My managed-care company stopped paying my specialty physician for his services more than one year ago. On May 18, 2000, I was a Cub Scout leader conducting a meeting in my backyard. After climbing a tree to retrieve a swing, I lost my footing and fell 20 feet, landing on my chin. I sustained a cervical spinal cord injury.
NEWS
March 17, 2012
In the Region Medical group back with Aetna Abington Medical Specialists , a large cardiology practice, is back in the Aetna network. The contract between the health insurer and the group, which has 17 cardiologists and two internists, expired Jan. 1. Adam Cohen, a doctor in the practice, said the group was back in the Aetna network as of Friday. He said he could not discuss terms of the contract because of a confidentiality agreement. The contract dispute, which focused on reimbursement rates, affected up to 10,000 Aetna subscribers.
NEWS
October 18, 1993 | by Banning Lyon, From the New York Times
I was one of hundreds of teenagers put in U.S. psychiatric hospitals in the mid-'80s for such "unusual" behavior as arguing with parents or having trouble in school. Most of us were diagnosed, by non-physicians, as suffering from serious depression. A doctor would later come in to confirm the diagnosis and bill our parents' insurance companies. We were held in institutions against our will until our insurance policies ran out. At that moment, we were somehow miraculously cured and discharged.
BUSINESS
August 3, 2002 | By Joseph N. DiStefano INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Rising medical costs plus losses from investments meant lower second-quarter profits for Cigna Corp. Its shares fell 4 percent yesterday to close at $83.95 after the Philadelphia employee-benefits giant reported second-quarter earnings of $214 million, down from an adjusted $264 million a year earlier. Cigna blamed higher losses from its bond and real estate portfolios, including investments in bankrupt WorldCom Inc. and other troubled companies. Also, chief financial officer James Stewart told investors that the company's insurance price increases had not kept pace with annual medical cost inflation of about 14 percent.
NEWS
February 19, 1993
For two years, Philadelphia has endured the charred hulk of One Meridian Plaza, towering at its center just yards from City Hall. If One Liberty Place is testimony to the booming '80s in Philadelphia, One Meridian Plaza symbolizes the '90s bust. It's a constant downer for a city trying to become upbeat again. Desert Storm's ground war was launched the day of the fire - Feb. 23, 1991. The campaign would conclude 100 hours later. Kuwait City - and even Baghdad - would be rebuilt.
BUSINESS
June 22, 2003 | By Karl Stark INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Like many businesses, the American Federation of State, County and Municipal Employees District Council 33 has seen its medical costs surge, rising by 28 percent last year alone. The union, which represents nearly 11,000 city workers and retirees, had an unusual response. It decided to spend more money. In January it hired a Blue Bell start-up named Health Advocate to help patients navigate the bewildering complexities of health insurance and medical care. Health Advocate operates on the notion that employees will work better if they can find the right doctor quickly and aren't spending time disputing hospital bills.
BUSINESS
December 7, 2011 | By Jane M. Von Bergen, Inquirer Staff Writer
At a time when health-insurance premiums continue their steady rise, Pennsylvania legislators will likely pass twin bills in the Senate and House that will broaden the state Insurance Department's ability to review rate increases. That sounds as if it should be good news to health advocates such as Antoinette Kraus and Sharon Ward, who have been tracking the legislation in Harrisburg. The bills are set to come to a vote Wednesday. But it's not good news, Kraus and Ward say. "If this law passes, fewer rate reviews will be scrutinized," said Ward, director of the Pennsylvania Budget and Policy Center in Harrisburg.
BUSINESS
August 14, 2001 | By Joseph N. DiStefano INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Also in this column: Stock market execution Digging for Reliance cash SunGard Data Systems Inc. is proving to be an extra-combative shopper in the corporate liquidation sales that have followed the popped Internet bubble. At stake for the acquisitive, Wayne-based financial-software company are big pieces of once high-flying info-tech companies that are now worth more dead than alive. After SunGard refused to match Reuters Group's $175 million bid for most of bankrupt Bridge Information Systems in May, SunGard turned around and hired three key Bridge employees, Bridge and Reuters complained in a federal lawsuit last month.
BUSINESS
December 11, 1998 | Daily News staff, Bloomberg News and wire reports
consumers SmithKline to pay $2.5M to end probe SmithKline Beecham will pay $2.5 million to end an investigation by 12 states, including Pennsylvania, into whether the company misled customers with ads suggesting the company's chewing gum and patch make it easy to quit smoking. The U.K.-based pharmaceutical company, with U.S. headquarters in Philadelphia, will pay $1.6 million for a public health campaign on the hazards of smoking and what smokers can expect to experience when trying to quit.
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