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Affirmative Action

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NEWS
August 29, 1997 | By Acel Moore
There are a couple of particularly pernicious notions about affirmative action (which seems to be under attack by everyone, including some black people) that bother me. One is that people who are admitted to elite universities under affirmative-action programs are unqualified and don't perform well in their chosen professions. False. In fact, a University of North Carolina study of law school graduates (even in California, where Proposition 209 has effectively ended affirmative-action admissions at some schools)
NEWS
November 12, 1998 | By Linda Wright Moore
The surprising strength of the Democrats in last Tuesday's elections, and the unexpected resignation of House Speaker Newt Gingrich, pushed a major civil-rights story out of the headlines: Initiative 200, Washington state's bid to end affirmative action in employment, education and contracting, passed with 58 percent of the vote. It was a stunning victory, because anti-affirmative- action forces were outspent 3 to 1 by the pro-affirmative-action camp, including heavy corporate hitters such as Boeing, Microsoft, Starbucks, Eddie Bauer and the Seattle Times, which devoted free ad space to fighting the ballot measure.
NEWS
May 23, 1988 | By Alan Sipress, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Camden County administration has proposed overhauling its affirmative- action practices to reverse what officials have concluded is a "poor record" on hiring and promoting blacks, Hispanics and women. In a plan to be given to the freeholders today, County Administrator Louis S. Bezich proposes that the county assign about 20 administration officials to monitor hiring and promotion. "There's a feeling that affirmative action has been icing on the cake," Freeholder Director Robert E. Andrews said.
NEWS
April 7, 1987 | By Coretta Scott King
America has never been the color-blind meritocracy of our highest ideals. But today we are a little closer to the goal of equal opportunity, thanks to a surprising shift by a majority of the U.S. Supreme Court. With the March 25 Johnson vs. Santa Clara Transportation Agency decision upholding the right of public employers to adopt hiring and promotional goals for women, the court has arrived at a consensus supporting affirmative action to help victims of discrimination. The ruling is right on time for the growing number of women who are becoming aware of sex discrimination on the job. A Gallup Poll reported March 20 that 56 percent of the women surveyed believe they do not have equal job opportunities with men, up from 49 percent in a 1975 Gallup Poll.
NEWS
March 27, 1995
Africans first came to the Western Hemisphere in chains, to work without pay for European settlers. After 245 years and a bloody civil war, the slaves were released. But for another 100 years they were denied full citizenship, terrorized and even hanged. After enactment of a civil-rights law and an epidemic of race riots, policies were created 30 years ago to compensate African-Americans for nearly 400 years of oppression. These policies are called "affirmative action. " Now black people are equal - in fact better than equal.
NEWS
February 23, 1995 | BY MOLLY IVINS
The conventional wisdom is already busy predicting that the "wedge issue" of the 1996 campaign will be affirmative action. Before you leap into the fray, are you sure you know what affirmative action means? Can you define the difference between affirmative action and reverse discrimination? Can you define the difference between affirmative action and anti- discrimination laws? Between affirmative action and quotas? Do you know which laws promote affirmative action and which encourage reverse discrimination?
NEWS
February 9, 1995 | By Acel Moore
Based on the intensity of the current political assault on affirmative action across the country by many Republicans, conservative Democrats and even some African Americans, one might think that so-called "reverse discrimination" is at the heart of most of America's economic woes. If you read the news stories about the debate, you'd think affirmative- action proposals were liberal Democratic initiatives that came out of the civil rights struggle of 30 years ago. You would think that they have outlived their usefulness and have severely limited the opportunities of white males to get government contracts, employment and education.
NEWS
January 21, 2000 | By David Boldt
One of the arguments supporting affirmative action in police hiring is that adding African American officers can help a department handle crime in black neighborhoods more effectively. However, John Lott, a professor at Yale Law School, has completed a study that appears to shoot a large hole in that argument. It shows that in cities where departments have entered into consent decrees to increase minority hiring, crime rates have risen. This is particularly true, he finds, in cities that have a disproportionately large black population.
NEWS
February 17, 1995 | By WILLIAM RASPBERRY
Hugh Price, the Urban League president who warmed conservative cockles last summer with his don't-blame-it-all-on-racism admonition, told an interesting story the other day. It was the spring of 1963, he said, and he had "really butchered" his test for admission to law school. He had been an outstanding high school student, and a solid B scholar at Amherst. But his law board score ("probably 200 points below that of the average white enrollee") threatened to derail his legal ambitions.
NEWS
February 28, 2012
MAYBE IT'S the magical ride of Knicks point guard Jeremy Lin that's been on my mind lately. When I heard that the Supreme Court would hear a case claiming that affirmative action at the University of Texas had resulted in discrimination against a white woman named Abigail Noel Fisher, I immediately thought: How do Asian students fare under college admissions and affirmative-action programs? Asians, after all, are a minority group, like blacks and Latinos. It turns out that Asians are seen as a worse enemy of the sacred goal of diversity on college campuses, and some studies have indicated that they must get substantially higher SAT scores than even white students to be considered for admission to the top colleges.
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NEWS
March 26, 2015 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
Novella S. Williams, 87, a West Philadelphia civic leader who began her fight against crime and corruption in her own neighborhood and pressed her advocacy of human rights and affirmative action onto the national stage, has died. Her family announced Tuesday that Mrs. Williams died Friday, March 20, of heart failure at her home, just as the sun set. Mrs. Williams was perhaps best known as the founder and president of Citizens for Progress Inc. (CFP). Under her five decades of leadership, the nonprofit worked to develop affirmative action in public education and to promote economic improvement for all, but especially those in the African American community.
NEWS
May 5, 2014
Deal breakers When Israel offered statehood to the Palestinians with terms on the partition of Jerusalem and other issues, the Palestinians not only refused to make a counteroffer; they literally fled to avoid responding ("Kerry's not the problem," May 1). Why? They clearly had no desire to make peace and still embrace the twisted dream that they will eventually drive the Jews into the sea. Now Hamas and Fattah, which controls the West Bank, have joined forces. The Hamas charter openly calls for the destruction of Israel.
NEWS
April 25, 2014
AFTER Tuesday's Supreme Court decision on affirmative action, we have a better idea why "Mad Men" is such a popular TV show. The series, set in the '60s, doesn't strike a note of nostalgia for the fashions, the glamour or the incessant smoking, but for the period in the country when actual progress was being made. Consider some of the milestones of the '60s: the court's Brown v. Board of Education decision, which prohibited segregated schools; the Civil Rights Act that outlawed discrimination; the enforcement of affirmative action for the first time; the Voting Rights Act; and the war on poverty, to name just a few. It was a time of high ideals and strong leaders who pushed the country to reach for racial, social, civic and financial equality.
NEWS
April 25, 2014
'Simplistic" is how Justice Sonia Sotomayor described the reasoning of a Supreme Court majority that effectively upheld laws in seven states banning affirmative action by colleges and universities. She's right. The 6-2 decision suggests a nation that no longer needs to directly address the vestiges of past discrimination, which have left minority communities poorer, sicker, and educationally deprived. Beyond that, the ruling suggests the courts need not intervene when a state executes a law that was properly enacted through a viable democratic process.
NEWS
April 24, 2014 | BY WILL BUNCH, Daily News Staff Writer bunchw@phillynews.com, 215-854-2957
IF YESTERDAY'S major Supreme Court ruling on affirmative action were a Hollywood movie, it would be "Back to the Future Part II. " Less than a year after the high court rolled back a key section of the 1965 Voting Rights Act, the backward-looking Supremes took a bite out of affirmative action by ruling that states can end racial preferences in public university admissions - if that's what a majority of the state's voters want. The justices' 6-2 ruling, in a case seeking to block a 2006 Michigan state referendum in which voters there banned public universities from using race to give college-admission preference, was also a win for seven other states with similar laws on the books - and it may lead to a wave of new state initiatives against affirmative action.
NEWS
October 25, 2013
A photograph that made the rounds via social media last week showed a young man proudly displaying a Confederate flag outside the White House after a protest of the government's closing of the World War II memorial. Maybe the man wants a new Civil War. Or maybe he believes this is a "post-racial" America in which that despicable symbol of slavery and discrimination no longer means what it once did. Based on their remarks in an affirmative-action case argued the same week, some members of the U.S. Supreme Court may also believe that race is no longer an issue in America.
NEWS
June 26, 2013 | By Susan Snyder, Inquirer Staff Writer
The U.S. Supreme Court declined to issue a definitive ruling Monday on the use of race in college admissions, instead ordering a lower court to re-examine the issue. The high court voted, 7-1, to send a University of Texas case - in which a white student denied admission challenged the university's use of race - back to the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Fifth Circuit. It said the appellate court had failed to hold the university to sufficient scrutiny as it sought to prove race was an essential consideration in efforts to develop a diverse student body.
NEWS
June 25, 2013
OUR INITIAL reaction upon hearing yesterday's news that the Supreme Court had basically punted on affirmative action, and realizing that one likely outcome of its decision was a whole bunch of new lawsuits about the issue, was to say, "Ugh. More fighting about affirmative action?" But after further reflection, we've recognized that it's silly to hope for anything like a resolution to the affirmative-action debate in 2013, tied up as it is in this country's troubled and ongoing struggle with race.
NEWS
November 16, 2012
Posting record loss of $15.9B WASHINGTON - The struggling U.S. Postal Service reported an annual loss Thursday of a record $15.9 billion and forecast more red ink in 2013. The losses for the fiscal year ended Sept. 30 were more than triple the $5.1 billion loss in the previous year. "It's critical that Congress do its part and pass comprehensive legislation before they adjourn this year to move the Postal Service further down the path toward financial health," said Postmaster General Patrick Donahoe, calling the situation "our own postal fiscal cliff.
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