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Affordable Housing

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NEWS
October 20, 2011 | By Geoff Mulvihill, Associated Press
A three-judge panel has slowed Gov. Christie's effort to make quick changes to the state's affordable housing requirements. The state appeals panel issued a stay Tuesday on his plan for new affordable housing procedures and scheduled a hearing for February. Until then, the state was ordered to follow the affordable housing procedures that were in place before the state Council on Affordable Housing was abolished last month. The ruling is the latest in a 40-year debate. Courts have ruled repeatedly that New Jersey municipalities are obligated to provide housing that low- and moderate-income residents can afford.
NEWS
June 8, 1989 | By Kathleen Martin Beans, Special to The Inquirer
A Bucks County Planning Commission official told Doylestown Township supervisors Tuesday that housing in the median price level is well beyond the reach of families with median incomes. "The affordable-housing crisis is much more than a matter of social concern affecting the less fortunate," said Kirk Emerson, director of countywide planning. "It has become a mainstream problem with far-reaching economic implications. " Emerson spoke to the supervisors and residents as part of a pilot program in which township officials offered to participate in a study with the county Planning Commission.
NEWS
October 6, 1999 | By Carrie Budoff and Marc Levy, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
The state Council on Affordable Housing is set to take a long-awaited vote today on Moorestown's amended plan to provide housing units for low- and moderate-income individuals. The plan, debated for almost two years, provides for rehabilitating some housing in Moorestown and paying two other towns - Mount Holly and Beverly - to supply housing there under what are known as regional contribution agreements. The council, which enforces fair-housing mandates, is to vote separately today on an arrangement in which Moorestown would pay Mount Holly $4.1 million to take 204 units of its 691-unit obligation over three years.
NEWS
April 15, 2009 | By Jennifer Lin INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Local nonprofit developers of affordable housing received almost $10 million in grants yesterday from the Federal Home Loan Banks of Pittsburgh and San Francisco, the largest awards to the region since the banks began funding low-income housing in 1990. The money is to go into 18 projects - 15 in Philadelphia and three in surrounding Pennsylvania counties - and produce 861 units of affordable housing. At a City Hall news conference, Mayor Nutter, U.S. Rep. Chaka Fattah (D., Pa.)
NEWS
November 15, 2011 | By James Osborne, Inquirer Staff Writer
Cherry Hill had its affordable-housing funds frozen Monday and was ordered to have a plan for spending the money approved by Superior Court. The order by Judge Robert G. Millenky followed allegations by the Fair Share Housing Center, which has been in litigation with Cherry Hill since 2001, that the township broke state rules about spending development fees intended for affordable-housing projects. "Fair Share has uncertainty" about use of the funds, "and the court finds reasonably so," Millenky said.
NEWS
February 8, 2011 | By Maya Rao, Inquirer Trenton Bureau
After Jean Siciliano lost her job as a purchasing agent during a corporate downsizing in 2009, she feared she could no longer afford to raise her teenage son in Evesham. She stayed in the suburb because a nonprofit agency approved her for a spacious apartment in a new housing development on Sharp Road for $658 in monthly rent. That development was built under a 1985 law - enacted in response to state Supreme Court rulings - requiring towns to provide low- and moderate-income housing.
NEWS
June 2, 2010 | By JAN RANSOM, ransomj@phillynews.com 215-854-5218
Eladia Fonseca came to Philadelphia as a 9-year-old burn victim, her mother seeking better care for her daughter than what was available after their home in Puerto Rico destroyed by fire. Fonseca endured years of living in inadequate housing here, some of which had no heat, was infested with mice and bugs and was surrounded by drug activity. Now 51, Fonseca proudly showed off her cozy, newly renovated three-bedroom home, one of 58 affordable-housing units scattered around her Spring Garden neighborhood that are part of a $19.6 million project that was unveiled yesterday.
NEWS
March 20, 1996 | By Matthew Futterman, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Mayor Gerald Luongo said last night that he has devised a plan to deal with the need to build affordable housing. His announcement came as more than 200 angry residents packed a Planning Board meeting to protest a proposed development that would include 48 units of affordable housing near Pitman-Downer and Fish Pond Roads. Protesting affordable housing has become a monthly ritual this year. This time, homeowners who live near the proposed development had their chance to tell the Planning Board why it should reject the Barnside Development Corp.
NEWS
December 5, 2011 | By Maya Rao, Inquirer Trenton Bureau
The Salem County town of Carneys Point needed to meet a state requirement to provide affordable housing, and developer John Bibeau had a plan: build an 88-unit apartment complex for disabled veterans and people with special needs and low and moderate incomes. He found an old factory building to serve as the site. He sat down with municipal officials, who had solicited him to do the project initially and to negotiate financing. In all, he said, he poured close to $750,000 into buying the property and paying fees for consultants, architects, and engineers.
NEWS
July 28, 1991 | By Christine Bahls, Special to The Inquirer
The Bristol Township Council has reversed itself and will help the county get additional funding for a new affordable-housing program. The new program, titled Home Investment in Affordable Housing and referred to as HOME, is a federally funded plan that would help qualified people become first-time homeowners, help renters, assist nonprofit groups in rehabilitating homes for the needy, or even provide grants for new affordable housing. A meeting was held Thursday night at the behest of the county so that the Bristol Township Council could reconsider its position.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
BUSINESS
August 26, 2014 | By Jane M. Von Bergen, Inquirer Staff Writer
Mark Vanderbeck turned 60 on Aug. 5, but his birthday gift arrived five days earlier, in the form of a promotion - to chief executive officer of ACTS Retirement-Life Communities. It's a big job. Based in West Point, ACTS employs 6,200 and operates 23 retirement communities - with housing ranging from independent apartment living to skilled nursing care for 8,500 residents. Question: What's it like to become a newly minted CEO? Did you feel anxious when you realized - "Wow, I'm responsible for all these people and all these employees"?
NEWS
August 19, 2014 | BY JENNY DeHUFF, Daily News Staff Writer dehuffj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5218
STRAWBERRY Mansion residents will be the benefactors of three Philadelphia Housing Authority projects within 24 months. The neighbors say they want and need the housing but they want to make sure they have a say in how it's done. City officials broke ground on the first development Tuesday: the Oakdale Street Apartments, on a longtime vacant lot in the north end of Strawberry Mansion. Twelve units will be built on Oakdale Street near 28th, across from the Widener Library. The three developments will result in a total investment of about $30 million.
REAL_ESTATE
August 4, 2014 | By Erin Arvedlund, Inquirer Staff Writer
Philadelphia needs more low-income housing for veterans, particularly those who served in recent conflicts such as the Gulf War, says Walter Kubiak of Mission First Housing Group. Kubiak, a Vietnam veteran, knows that vets often have mental-health issues that don't manifest themselves for years, and that they may then have trouble finding housing. "We have a lot of young people in Philadelphia who've spent years in combat under incredible stress," he said. "They come back with head injuries that would have killed them in previous wars.
REAL_ESTATE
July 28, 2014 | By Erin Arvedlund, Inquirer Staff Writer
David La Fontaine is the new executive director of Community Ventures, a Quaker-inspired builder of affordable housing and one of the few nonprofit developers left in the city. Its latest projects include Ingersoll Commons at 16th and Master Streets, affordable housing with open green space, and Centennial Village, affordable rental apartments behind the Mann Music Center at 52d Street and Parkside Avenue. La Fontaine is pushing for more affordable housing, even as million-dollar homes keep popping up around Center City.
NEWS
July 18, 2014 | By Chris Hepp, Inquirer Staff Writer
]When her husband died in December, Lauren Davis knew it was time to move. The rent on her rather tired Grays Ferry home was going up, and her landlord was not terribly responsive. The 63-year-old retired teacher's aide feared, however, that she did not have the means to relocate within her beloved neighborhood. "I didn't know what I was going to do," Davis said. The answer was phase two of the Anthony Wayne Senior Housing complex at South 28th and Morris Streets, which was developed by the Altman Group with the backing of City Councilman Kenyatta Johnson.
BUSINESS
July 9, 2014 | By Erin Arvedlund, Inquirer Staff Writer
A nine-story affordable housing project will break ground at 810 Arch St. in September, thanks to an innovative partnership among nonprofit developers and the city to improve the blighted block. Sister Mary Scullion's Project HOME and the Philadelphia Chinatown Development Corp. (PCDC) will build the $23.5 million apartment complex on an empty lot on the south side of Arch Street. Expected to be completed by late 2015, the complex will provide 94 efficiency apartments for lower-income rental tenants ranging in age from seniors to children aging out of foster care.
NEWS
June 28, 2014 | By Troy Graham, Inquirer Staff Writer
Although real estate developer Ori Feibush plans to run for Kenyatta Johnson's seat on Philadelphia City Council, the first battle between the men may play out in federal court. Feibush filed a lawsuit late Wednesday accusing Johnson of preventing him from buying two vacant city lots and thwarting his bid to build on a larger tract, both as political retribution. "It's unconscionable to retaliate," Feibush said. "You may not like me - and that's OK - but you have to follow the law. " Johnson previously said he halted the sale of two vacant lots on the 1300 block of South Cleveland Street in Point Breeze because he wanted them set aside as part of an affordable housing strategy championed by Council President Darrell L. Clarke.
NEWS
June 20, 2014 | By Jennifer Lin, Inquirer Staff Writer
In a historic pact, the city's building-trades unions have agreed to cut their wages and benefits by 20 percent when working on residential construction projects for the Philadelphia Housing Authority. Kelvin Jeremiah, PHA chief executive officer and president, said the pact would, on average, reduce PHA's cost of building a house by $50,000, allowing the public housing authority to increase the number of affordable homes it can build. "This is unheard-of," Jeremiah said Wednesday.
NEWS
June 16, 2014 | By Suzette Parmley, Inquirer Staff Writer
The acronym alone, COAH, which stands for the Council on Affordable Housing, evokes fear and distrust among some. But the level of opposition to proposed developments with low- and moderate-income units under court-ordered COAH requirements in three Camden County neighborhoods - including a historic golf course - has been surprising even to some longtime housing advocates. Residents who live near the proposed sites - two in Cherry Hill and one in Berlin - are letting it be known they don't want them in their backyards by filing lawsuits, staging sign-holding protests, and/or packing public hearings.
NEWS
June 11, 2014 | By Suzette Parmley, Inquirer Staff Writer
The developer of a proposed 472-unit apartment complex for Berlin Borough that would include affordable housing requirements was granted a postponement of a hearing for the project by the borough's nine-member Planning Board on Monday night. Richard J. Hoff Jr., attorney for Berlin Multifamily L.L.C., based in Berlin Borough, made the request on the grounds that the project and the interest it has generated required a bigger venue and that issues remained pertaining to the project's street lighting and storm water system.
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