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BUSINESS
August 20, 1987 | From Inquirer Wire Services
Settling one of the bitterest labor disputes of the past decade, the AFL- CIO ended its 10-year boycott of Coors beer yesterday after the Adolph Coors Co. pledged not to interfere with union organizing attempts at the company's Golden, Colo., brewery. The company also said it would use union construction forces in building a new brewery in Elkton, Va. "We achieved our aims. It is . . . a resounding success for workers," said AFL-CIO President Lane Kirkland. "We're confident that Coors employees, given a free, fair and unfettered opportunity to choose a collective- bargaining representative, will . . . elect to be represented by an AFL-CIO union.
NEWS
September 13, 1995 | by Cynthia Burton, Daily News Staff Writer
After three tries, Mayor Rendell finally won an endorsement from the AFL- CIO's board yesterday. Today, the board will recommend Rendell to a body of delegates who have the final say. Rendell, a Democrat, has been in the embarrassing position of having the city's biggest labor coalition unable to muster an endorsement for him. At three previous board meetings, Rendell's supporters failed to get enough votes to secure the endorsement....
NEWS
December 4, 1986 | By Edward Power, Inquirer Staff Writer
Four vice presidents of the Philadelphia Council of the AFL-CIO have accused Edward F. Toohey, the council's longtime president, of engaging in "unfair manipulation" of membership records to ensure his re-election next week. In a letter sent Tuesday to national AFL-CIO president Lane Kirkland, the four said Toohey has repeatedly denied them access to documents that would validate the number of dues-paying council members eligible to vote in the election Wednesday. Earlier this week, Toohey estimated that more than 150,000 union members had paid their council dues and would be permitted to vote.
NEWS
August 5, 2011 | By Angela Delli Santi, Associated Press
TRENTON - The AFL-CIO took revenge on New Jersey legislators who supported a pension and health-benefits overhaul by voting Thursday not to endorse any lawmaker who supported the deal, including fellow union members and the Legislature's most powerful Democrat. Senate President Stephen Sweeney (D., Gloucester), who pushed the benefits legislation over the objection of organized labor, was the most prominent target of the union's payback. Sweeney, an ironworker, has supported paid family leave and other pro-labor issues.
NEWS
July 24, 1998 | By Russell E. Eshleman Jr., INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The state AFL-CIO overlooked its Democratic tradition yesterday by endorsing Republican U.S. Sen. Arlen Specter in his bid for reelection. It was the first time the organization, which represents about a million workers in locals ranging from the building trades to public employees, had given its backing to Specter in a general election. The AFL-CIO did remain loyal to Democrats in the other big statewide contest. It endorsed State Rep. Ivan Itkin for governor and former U.S. Rep. Marjorie Margolies-Mezvinsky for lieutenant governor.
NEWS
July 28, 2005 | By Jane M. Von Bergen INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Hundreds of union delegates reelected John J. Sweeney to his fourth term as president of the AFL-CIO yesterday, just two days after some of the federation's largest labor unions quit. Sweeney, 71, who is the center of the controversy, had been president of one of them, the Service Employees International Union, when he became AFL-CIO president 10 years ago. The Teamsters also left. The dissidents complained that the AFL-CIO's membership had not grown enough under his watch.
NEWS
July 24, 1998 | by John M. Baer, Daily News Staff Writer
Democrat Ivan Itkin, a candidate widely seen as facing a mountain in November, was tossed a rope yesterday when the state's largest organized labor group endorsed him for governor. The Pennsylvania AFL-CIO cited Itkin's 25-year state House voting record as pro-union and helping "working families. " Singled-out were Itkin votes in favor of minimum wage increases and family medical leave, and votes against privatizing State Stores. AFL-CIO President Bill George used the endorsement press conference to tag Republican Gov. Ridge as "the governor of the elites, the rich, the corporate society . . . [and]
NEWS
July 18, 1986 | By BOB GROTEVANT, Daily News Staff Writer
Democrat Robert Edgar, who has a nearly perfect pro-labor voting record in Congress, won the Pennsylvania AFL-CIO's endorsement for the U.S. Senate yesterday. Edgar's endorsement was a blow to incumbent U.S. Sen. Arlen Specter, who had spent several days, including the hours leading up to yesterday's vote, urging the state's labor leaders to take no stand on the race. "I'm really honored and pleased . . . very encouraged," Edgar said last night. "Arlen Specter showed how fearful he is of my candidacy by working so hard to try to block the endorsement.
NEWS
February 20, 1990 | By Lisa Ellis, Inquirer Staff Writer The Washington Post contributed to this article
Declining to take an immediate position on abortion, the AFL-CIO Executive Council yesterday formed a 14-member committee to consider whether the labor federation should take a stand on the issue. The council was acting in response to half a dozen resolutions introduced by constituent unions at the AFL-CIO's biennial convention in November. All of the resolutions asked the 14-million-member organization to declare, for the first time, support for abortion rights, but instead the issue was referred to the executive council.
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BUSINESS
August 3, 2016 | By Jane M. Von Bergen, Staff Writer
Infrastructure. That's what John "Johnny Doc" Dougherty wants from Hillary Clinton, if she becomes the next president of the United States. "I'm going to lobby for a subway from here to the Navy Yard," Dougherty said at last week's DNC convention. Nobody comes to a political convention without an agenda - not Hillary Clinton, not Bernie Sanders, not the hundreds of lobbyists, and particularly not organized labor. For them, and everyone else, the convention was about making impressions and making contacts.
NEWS
June 23, 2016 | By Jane M. Von Bergen, STAFF WRITER
Richard Trumka, president of the national AFL-CIO, the nation's largest labor federation, spoke at the New Jersey AFL-CIO convention in Atlantic City Tuesday, praising Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton and saying that GOP candidate Donald Trump "is profoundly unfit to be president. " At the convention, Charles Wowkanech and Laurel Brennan were re-elected president and secretary-treasurer by some 600 union leaders, all delegates attending the state AFL-CIO's convention.
NEWS
May 27, 2016
DEAR ABBY: Americans are at their best when they unite around a noble purpose. On Memorial Day, that purpose is the National Moment of Remembrance. On that day, all Americans are asked to pause wherever they are at 3 p.m. local time to honor our fallen. In 1971, No Greater Love, a patriotic organization, was founded by a woman named Carmella LaSpada. It initiated the National Moment of Remembrance in 1997, which was later established by Congress in 2000. The moment is observed by thousands of Americans at Major League Baseball games across the country.
NEWS
April 12, 2016
Today's topic is political déjà vu. Pennsylvania is known for it. Same kind of stuff over and over. It even shows up in campaigns. Take our April 26 Democratic U.S. Senate primary, featuring Joe Sestak, Katie McGinty and John Fetterman. If you're following at all you might be thinking, hey, wait, this feels familiar. You're right. It's not a total match with a past campaign, and Fetterman is certainly something new, but there are similarities between this race and the 2010 Democratic Senate primary, which also featured and was won by one Joe Sestak.
NEWS
April 7, 2016
With Pennsylvania's April 26 primary approaching, presidential candidates are headed to the Philadelphia area, seeking votes and snarling traffic. Former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton is to address a state AFL-CIO conference at 11:15 a.m. Wednesday at the Sheraton Philadelphia Downtown Hotel, 17th and Race Streets. Then she sits down with Mayor Kenney at a "community roundtable" in Kensington at 12:45 p.m., before heading to Pittsburgh. Her rival for the Democratic nomination, Sen. Bernie Sanders of Vermont, is to appear at 6 p.m. Wednesday at a community event at Tindley Temple United Methodist Church, 762 S. Broad St. This event is by invitation only.
NEWS
April 7, 2016 | By Jane M. Von Bergen, Staff Writer
Maybe the Democrats are the party of working people, said Richard Trumka, leader of the nation's largest federation, the AFL-CIO. But "look how easy it has been for Donald Trump to tap into the justifiable anger" of Americans living paycheck to paycheck, unable to cover a $500 car repair, he told 700 Pennsylvania labor leaders Tuesday at the Pennsylvania AFL-CIO's convention in Philadelphia. "But we can't be fooled," he added. "Trump isn't interested in solving our problems. " And so it began Tuesday, three weeks from Pennsylvania's primary, as the state's top union leaders exhorted each other - with help from Trumka - to double down on their efforts to elect politicians who "create an economy that works for everybody," he said.
NEWS
April 6, 2016 | By Jane M. Von Bergen, Staff Writer
Democratic presidential candidates Hillary Clinton and Bernie Sanders will woo Pennsylvania's labor leaders this week at the Pennsylvania AFL-CIO's convention in Philadelphia. More than 700 labor leaders and delegates will gather in Philadelphia on Tuesday, Wednesday, and Thursday in a conference focused on politics - and other worker issues, including raising the minimum wage. Clinton is expected to speak Wednesday morning at 11:15, and Sanders will address the group on Thursday at 10 a.m. "Other than New York, we're the next battleground," Richard "Rick" Bloomingdale, president of the Pennsylvania AFL-CIO, said last week.
NEWS
March 15, 2015 | By Claudia Vargas, Inquirer Staff Writer
For former City Councilman James F. Kenney, Friday the 13th was anything but unlucky. The aspiring Philadelphia mayor received one of the biggest endorsements a candidate can land - from the Philadelphia Council, AFL-CIO - plus the backing of some of the city's LGBT leaders, representing a growing voter bloc, and the teachers' union. The AFL-CIO council is composed of more than 100 unions representing 130,000 workers in the public sector, private industry, and the building and construction trades.
BUSINESS
September 2, 2014 | By Jane M. Von Bergen, Inquirer Staff Writer
Maybe, on Labor Day, at the head of the annual Labor Day parade of union members - the T-shirted battalions of union teachers, truck drivers, trash crews, postal workers, hospital dieticians, building engineers, stagehands, and riggers - Patrick J. Eiding will be able to forget, for a moment, the relentless union bashing he often encounters. To Eiding, 73, president of the Philadelphia Council of the AFL-CIO, a federation of about 100 Philadelphia-area union locals, it seems so frustratingly backwards.
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