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ENTERTAINMENT
March 14, 2012 | By Lini S. Kadaba, For The Inquirer
Destiny is a funny thing. From Day 1 to Day 24 - and the months before and after a four-week shoot in Ghana - Deron Albright's first feature film, The Destiny of Lesser Animals , appeared doomed. "It was just the relentlessness of the challenges," said Albright, 42, of Narberth, a director and associate professor of film at St. Joseph's University. "Any one given bad day is doable. This was day upon day. . . . It has been an exhausting process. " On more than one occasion, everyone involved - from the L.A. cameraman who slept on Albright's couch to the lead actor who paid his own airfare to Ghana - wondered whether the film four years in the making would ever see the big screen.
TRAVEL
January 10, 2016
Answer: Mount Kilimanjaro. The Tanzanian peak tops out at about 19,340 feet. It's an ascent popular with inexperienced climbers.
NEWS
June 25, 2010
US Airways and Spanish carrier Spanair announced today an agreement that will give US Airways passengers access to additional destinations in Spain, the Canary Islands, continental Europe and Africa. The deal, which substantially expands an existing agreement between the two airlines, is effective Saturday. It gives passengers so-called single-source booking, ticketing and baggage connections for flights on either airline. US Airways is the dominant carrier serving Philadelphia International Airport, with about 60 percent of the traffic.
NEWS
February 23, 1988 | By RAMONA SMITH, Daily News Staff Writer
The wandering ash ship from Philadelphia has set out into the Atlantic again, this time headed for an undisclosed destination in Africa. The Coast Guard in Miami said today the Khian Sea, which has roamed the oceans for 17 months, left for Africa over the weekend after repairs were made to the vessel off the Florida Coast. "I'm not able to find out where he's going in Africa and it's really no concern of ours to pursue it any further," Coast Guard Petty Officer Steven Allen said.
NEWS
May 18, 2004
The United States has two ways to export its most prized beliefs and pursue the fight against terrorism. One means, as seen in Afghanistan and Iraq, is to use unparalleled military might to crush regimes implicated in terror (or at least alleged to be). This works to chase despots out of capitals, but it has some ever-more-obvious drawbacks. The other means are good deeds that show the benign side of the American superpower by aiding struggling nations, including many in Africa, that might become havens for terrorists.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 22, 2011 | By Victoria Donohoe, For The Inquirer
'Possible Cities: Africa in Photography & Video" is a major exhibition now at Haverford College, developed in conjunction with the 2011 Mellon Symposium "Imaging Africa," an international event held there recently. The display acknowledges that we live in a "city century" or "urban millennium," and that Africa is growing more citified at a faster rate than any other continent. Lagos, Nigeria, is one of the largest cities on Earth, and Nigeria's Nollywood is the world's third-largest and fastest-growing film industry.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 28, 2014
A FREE TRIP TO Africa? Yo, what kind of scam is that? That's what I thought when I first heard what the d'Zert Club does. It sounded like a deal that was way too good to be true. But it's the real deal. Since 1998, the d'Zert Club has been taking groups of youngsters to explore Africa the way some groups take kids to ride roller coasters at Hershey Park. For their first trip, the d'Zert Club went to Senegal's Goree Island, visiting the Door of No Return, through which slaves passed on their way to the Americas.
NEWS
April 4, 1993 | By Karen E. Quinones Miller, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
"Americans, and particularly American children, are quite unfamiliar with contemporary Africa and especially the positive and progressive aspects of Africa," says Jack Lutz, a retired educator and a Mount Laurel resident. "When children here think of Africa, they think of it as being Tarzan and the jungle, . . . which is a shame because it's really quite a beautiful place. " Lutz should know. He and his wife, Paz, spent more than 20 years in Africa working in small villages helping to develop programs for education, health and community development.
NEWS
July 3, 2014 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON, Daily News Staff Writer morrisj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5573
JACK LUTZ didn't know how to quit. After serving as an educator all over the world - Philadelphia, Montgomery County, Ethiopia, Nigeria, Sierra Leone, Poland - he was teaching cartooning at an adult learning center. In fact, he was preparing a lesson plan for the course when he died June 29 at age 92. He lived in Mount Laurel, N.J. "He would exhaust you and me and five other people," said his son, Barry Lutz. "He didn't sleep. " After 30 years in Africa, and pushing 70, Jack decided to join the Peace Corps and taught college in Poland for several more years.
NEWS
July 30, 2012 | Reviewed by David L. Ulin
Our Kind of People A Continent's Challenge, a Country's Hope By Uzodinma Iweala Harper Collins. 240 pp. $24.99   About halfway through Our Kind of People: A Continent's Challenge, a Country's Hope , a stunning inquiry into the AIDS crisis in sub-Saharan Africa, Uzodinma Iweala makes the thrust of his investigation clear. "I found his words interesting," he writes of a Nigerian politician who blames the disease's spread on long-distance truckers and rest-stop sex workers, "because they seemed to externalize both the epidemic and its primary means of transmission - sex. By focusing on these groups of people that Nigerians traditionally consider promiscuous or of lax morality, he seemed to suggest that normal people with normal monogamous sexual relationships exist outside the reach of the virus.
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TRAVEL
August 15, 2016 | By Kathy Thomas, For The Inquirer
How did I end up in South Africa? The travel bug bit me as a teenager. But when I recently retired from a long career, I wanted to travel with more purpose. Africa has always called to me, but I wanted to feel connected to a community. I stumbled upon Volunteers in Africa, and through them I connected with St. George's Home for Girls. My lodging was a hostel in Cape Town. It was basic, lively, and friendly. Bathrooms were down the hall, and my fellow residents were mostly less than half my age. I spent my mornings seeing the sights in Cape Town and my afternoons with the children of St. George's.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 16, 2016 | By Elizabeth Wellington, Fashion Writer
I always assumed the vibrantly printed array of wrap skirts, maxi dresses, and kufis sold at African street fairs like last weekend's Odunde Festival were inspired by fabrics and silhouettes indigenous to the continent. Turns out I was only half right. The styles - iros (wraparound skirts), geles (head wraps), and bubas (loose-fitting blouses) - are native to central and west African countries. But ankara, the striking wax-coated cotton fabric from which the clothing is often fashioned, traces its heritage to the Netherlands.
NEWS
June 13, 2016 | John Timpane
Here are a few outstanding museum and gallery shows you should not miss this summer. Creative Africa (Through Sept. 25, Philadelphia Museum of Art) This big show is simply a revelation - the visionary work of artists throughout Africa, from contemporary photography, fashion, and architecture to centuries-old sculpture. Also programs, artist talks, family festivals, and community conversations. (215-763-8100, philamuseum.org ) Daylight Harmony: Larry Francis (Through June 30, Gross McCleaf Gallery)
NEWS
June 8, 2016
By Chris Coons Last week, I led a group of my colleagues on a trip to South Africa. Along with Rep. John Lewis (D., Ga.), a hero of America's civil rights movement, and Kerry Kennedy, president of RFK Human Rights and daughter of the late Sen. Robert F. Kennedy, we traveled to South Africa to commemorate the 50th anniversary of the senator's historic "Ripples of Hope" speech at the University of Cape Town. On June 6, 1966, speaking to a nation struggling through the cruel injustices of apartheid, Kennedy began his speech by describing "a land in which the native inhabitants were at first subdued, but relations with whom remain a problem to this day; a land which defined itself on a hostile frontier; . . . a land which was once the importer of slaves, and now must struggle to wipe out the last traces of that former bondage.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 28, 2016
"The Architecture of Francis Kéré: Building for Community," part of the Creative Africa exhibit. Through Sept. 25, in the Collab Gallery and the Skylit Atrium at the Philadelphia Museum of Art Perelman Building.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 28, 2016 | By Inga Saffron, Inquirer Architecture Critic
Francis Kéré had to travel long and far from his tiny farming village in Burkina Faso , an African nation that skirts the edge of the Sahara, before he ended up with a show at the Philadelphia Museum of Art. As a boy of 7, he was sent away to a larger town to attend school. Later, he made his way to Germany to study architecture. In 2001, he took his design skills back to his village and fashioned a modern school out of handmade mud bricks. That one-story structure may look like a simple little schoolhouse - albeit one with a rakishly tilted metal roof - but its impact has reverberated around the globe, adding momentum to a movement known as public-interest architecture.
NEWS
May 23, 2016 | By Tom Hines
One of the first things visitors encounter in "Look Again: Contemporary Perspectives on African Art," the centerpiece exhibition of the five-show " Creative Africa " event at the Philadelphia Museum of Art, is a diviner's kit. The kit, from the Ovimbundu culture of Angola, consists of an array of seemingly miscellaneous objects, including some tiny figurines, a colored crystalline rock, and a number of more enigmatic items. The diviner carried them in a basket, and when someone sought his advice or predictions, he tossed them out. His skill was in looking at how they landed and interpreting the position and juxtaposition of the objects in a way that was useful to those who sought his services.
NEWS
May 22, 2016
Scientists are planning a major study of an experimental HIV vaccine in South Africa later this year. The shots are based on the only attempted HIV vaccine ever to show even marginal effectiveness, in Thailand in 2009. The U.S. National Institutes of Health said Wednesday that its study in South Africa will use shots modified for better protection. Starting in November, 5,400 adult volunteers would receive five injections over a year, either vaccine or dummy shots. Results are expected in 2020.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 14, 2016 | By Tirdad Derakhshani, Staff Writer
Affleck commits to Africa "I felt like I was always chasing the next job, singing for my supper," Ben Affleck , 43, says in Glamour's May issue. "I didn't feel like I had anything that I could point to and say - and I know this is a cliché - 'I gave back; here are the footprints I left in the sand.' " He found a worthy cause during a 2007 fact-finding journey through war-torn regions of Africa, including Eastern Congo. "What I saw was people trying to work and keep their families upright after the child soldiers and the sexual violence," says Affleck, founder of the Eastern Congo Initiative, which helps former child soldiers and women subjected to systematic rape.
TRAVEL
February 28, 2016
Answer: Asia. With about 17 million square miles, it easily outranks Africa, which is about 11.7 million square miles.
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