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NEWS
July 2, 1991 | BY REGINALD H. HOLDER
There has been a lot of discussion about how Ed Rendell's victory in the May primary constituted a signal of the maturation of the African-American electorate as evidenced by the fact that in a citywide campaign a white candidate could win an election where African-American voters had the option of choosing between two black candidates. I don't buy it. What Rendell's victory represented was more of the same old politics as usual, divide and conquer when it comes to the African-American vote.
NEWS
August 8, 1994 | BY MARY MASON
Where were dozens of newspaper articles, columns and feature stories as well as radio and television commentaries about Mayor W. Wilson Goode's responsibility to appease his African-American supporters because he was Philadelphia's first African-American mayor. Racial references were dominant in virtually every story about local politics and government during Goode's tenure. Columnist Jill Porter did not write that the portrayal of Goode as an African- American, appeasing other African-Americans, was racially offensive.
NEWS
January 30, 2008 | By GLORIA CAMPISI campisg@phillynews.com 215-854-5935 Daily News Staff writer Christine Olley contributed to this report
Pennsylvania dropped from first to second place in 2005 in the number of African-American citizens murdered - many of them young and most killed with guns, according to a study of the latest data available, the Violence Policy Center announced yesterday. Missouri knocked us out of the No. 1 spot - but only by a little more than one-half percent. According to an analysis of FBI data by the Violence Policy Center, Missouri recorded 32.79 African-American homicide victims per 100,000 in 2005.
NEWS
June 7, 2006
AS AN African-American who listens to sports-talk radio, I often wonder where is the diversity and difference of opinion when African-American athletes like Barry Bonds are constantly ridiculed. The majority of callers say Bonds should have an asterisk next to his name for breaking Babe Ruth's record after allegations that Bonds may have used steroids. How come these callers never say there should be an asterisk next to Ruth's name because he didn't play against African-American athletes?
NEWS
December 24, 2002
IN THE Dec. 12 edition, we were asked to vote for our favorite Eagles cheerleader squad. Why in a city with an African-American mayor, fire commissioner, police commissioner, where the majority of residents are African-American, with an Eagles team that is at least 75 percent African-American, and the star player (Donovan McNabb) is also African- American - why is this cheerleading squad about 10 percent African-American? Did my black sisters not show up for the audition? T. Parker Sicklerville, N.J. The unplowed Northeast I was so relieved to read that Frank Keel got home safely to Montgomery County during the city's latest snowstorm.
SPORTS
April 17, 2012 | By Don McKee, Inquirer Columnist
At 9-1, the Dodgers own the top record in the majors and are off to their best start since 1981. They also, if replays are worth anything, got a huge gift Sunday night in a 5-4 win over San Diego. The Dodgers killed a Padre rally in the top of the ninth with the first 2-5-6-3 double play in major-league history. With two on in a 4-4 game, San Diego's Jesus Guzman squared to bunt, but Javy Guera's pitch came high and tight and hit Guzman's bat as he backed up from the pitch.
NEWS
February 11, 1992 | by Ed Voves, Special to the Daily News
In 1865, a lynch mob tried to seize an African-American man named Louis Wells from the Carrollton, Ala., courthouse. The mob suddenly dispersed as a lightning storm struck. Wells' body was found the next morning on the upper story of the courthouse; he was the victim of a lightning bolt. The outline of his face was etched onto the pane of glass through which he peered at the moment of his death. The uncanny incident at Carrollton Courthouse is described in George Cantor's "Historic Black Landmarks: A Traveler's Guide" (Visible Ink Press/ $17.95)
NEWS
May 18, 1989 | BY DON WILLIAMSON
The television set almost went out the window Tuesday night. New York City Mayor Ed Koch was on ABC's "Nightline. " The topic was the crime, violence and early burials that have made young African-American males an endangered species. The issue made national television because of the recent brutal, senseless beating and rape of a woman jogger in Central Park. The woman was a young white investment banker. Her attackers were African- American teen-age boys out for a night of "wilding," which included beating an innocent victim with a lead pipe until her head split open and blood ran from her eyes.
NEWS
April 13, 1990 | BY CHUCK STONE
Dear Chuck: You've always been a good friend of the Irish and our family looks forward to your St. Patrick's Day column. You listed some of your Irish co-workers. My friend, Jim Smith, was omitted. He is a true son of the sod. His mother was born in the county of Donegal and his father was born in the county of Leitrim. You can't get any more Irish than that, wouldn't you agree? Sincerely, Dooley Hennessy Agreed. The Jim Smith family is so Irish they can hold their own St. Patrick's Day parade!
NEWS
February 28, 1994
WHY BLACK HISTORY? A co-worker and I were talking about mandatory black history classes in the schools. My co-worker, who is white, said if this were implemented, the Polish, Irish, Italian and every other ethnic group would expect the same. And secondly, it wouldn't be cost-effective. I explained that the blacks who came here weren't immigrants who brought their culture along. Blacks, brought here in chains, were stripped of their language, culture, religion and history.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
July 21, 2016
VIDEO EVIDENCE clearly indicated that a portion of Melania Trump's speech to the Republican National Convention was copied from a passage of Michelle Obama's 2008 speech to the Democratic National Convention. The plagiarism, we can forgive. After all, the stolen passages dealt with the principles of keeping one's word, working hard and dreaming big. Such words are laudable, whether Democrats or Republicans utter them. But once the plagiarism was proved, Donald Trump's campaign manager, Paul Manafort, arrogantly told us that it was "beyond absurd" to believe that Melania Trump would steal Obama's words.
NEWS
July 16, 2016
Police on Thursday were investigating a threat to bomb the African American Museum in Philadelphia during the Democratic National Convention here this month. The museum, at Seventh and Arch Streets in Center City, received a threatening letter Thursday and reported it to police. Chief Inspector Joseph Sullivan, who oversees homeland security for city police, said detectives were investigating. Museum officials could not be reached for comment. - Robert Moran
NEWS
June 21, 2016 | By Rahim Islam
"We're going to rebuild our inner cities, which are absolutely a shame and so sad. We're going to take care of our African-American people that have been mistreated for so long. " - Donald Trump, June 7, 2016 I AM on record for attacking Trump for some of the most bigoted and racist statements he has made over the course of this presidential election; however, if he says something of extreme importance that acknowledges the plight of the African-American community, I have a moral obligation to respond to that, as well.
NEWS
June 11, 2016 | By Stephan Salisbury, Culture Writer
Octavius V. Catto, one of Philadelphia's greatest of Renaissance men, an activist, educator, writer, athlete, and speaker gunned down in election violence in 1871, will at last be fully honored by the city where he lived and died for his beliefs and for the color of his skin. The design for a public memorial to Catto, which will grace City Hall's southern apron, will be presented to the public at a Mayor's Reception Room gathering at 11 a.m. Friday, and the artist, Branly Cadet, will be introduced to talk about his work.
NEWS
June 9, 2016 | By Dana Milbank
Donald Trump needed validation. At a rally Friday, Trump was discussing racial violence at his events and the perception that nonwhite people are against him when he singled out a black man in the crowd. "Look at my African American over here," Trump said, pointing. "Look at him. Are you the greatest?" The gesture - reminiscent of Trump with a Cinco de Mayo taco bowl at Trump Tower tweeting "I love Hispanics!" - was as respectful as if he had just instructed the crowd to "look at my Irish setter over here.
BUSINESS
June 5, 2016 | By Chris Mondics, Staff Writer
Mark C. Alexander, named Friday as the new dean of Villanova University's Charles Widger School of Law, has had a long and varied career as a law school administrator and scholar, a litigator, and even a political adviser and candidate. He served at one time as senior adviser for President Obama's 2008 presidential election campaign, and once ran for office - unsuccessfully, in the Democratic primary for the New Jersey Senate in 2013. He has been widely published, and is known as an expert on the First Amendment.
NEWS
May 27, 2016 | By Stephan Salisbury, Culture Writer
In one of Theodore Harris' collages, now on view at the African American Museum in Philadelphia, bursts of red bleed over a printed ballot form, stickers and images layer the surface: U.S. Out of Iraq Now, Does Praying Do Any Good?, Stop Executions, the Death Penalty Is a Hate Crime. At the center of this jittery, violent triptych, beneath a plume of exploding, cascading black, is an image of Malcolm X. Harris' piece is called The Ballot or the Bullet , a very direct reference to Malcolm X's famous 1964 speech: "It's time now for you and me to become more politically mature and realize what the ballot is for; what we're supposed to get when we cast a ballot; and that if we don't cast a ballot, it's going to end up in a situation where we're going to have to cast a bullet.
NEWS
May 23, 2016 | By David Patrick Stearns, Classical Music Critic
NEW YORK - Tucked into the usual Broadway Playbill for the new hit Shuffle Along at the Music Box Theatre is something that's not the typical size or color: a sepia replica of the show's original 1921 program from the long-demolished 63rd Street Music Hall, evidence of the distant world from which the show comes. Known as the first African American megahit, the 1921 version of Shuffle Along made the careers of songwriters Eubie Blake and Noble Sissle and helped launch Florence Mills, Adelaide Hall, and Josephine Baker.
NEWS
April 29, 2016 | By Chris Palmer, Staff Writer
Willie L. Williams, 72, an Overbrook native who became the first African American to head the Philadelphia and Los Angeles Police Departments and a major figure in law enforcement in the 1990s, died Tuesday night at his home in Fayetteville, Ga. Mr. Williams' sister-in-law Pat Odoms said pancreatic cancer was the cause. Mr. Williams, who began his career in 1964 as a Fairmount Park guard, was appointed Philadelphia's police commissioner in 1988 and served for four years. He earned widespread praise for improving police-community relations, increasing diversity in the upper ranks, and decentralizing the department.
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