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African American Art

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NEWS
November 14, 1998 | ALEJANDRO A. ALVAREZ/ DAILY NEWS
Philadelphia artist Samuel R. Byrd arranges his work for the 13th Philadelphia Art Expo at the Apollo of Temple, 1776 N. Broad St. The exhibition is the largest display of African-American art in the nation. It continues today from 10 a.m. to 10 p.m. and tomorrow from 10 a.m. to 7 p.m. Admission is free. For more information, call 215-629-3939 or 215-204-2400.
NEWS
November 10, 2003 | By Matthew P. Blanchard INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Maybe it was The Cosby Show, said influential gallery owner Mercer Redcross. Hanging on the walls of the Huxtables' home was the work of African American artists, Redcross said, and African Americans in the 1980s took note. Or perhaps it was simply the inevitable flow of history that finally produced a sizable art-buying community among U.S. blacks, he said. Either way, what observers call a rising class of art-savvy African Americans could be seen inside Temple's Liacouras Center this weekend at the 18th annual Philadelphia International Art Expo.
NEWS
October 15, 2011 | By Stephan Salisbury, Inquirer Culture Writer
For more than four decades, Sande Webster has been a torch on the Philadelphia art scene. First at Locust Street Gallery, founded by Webster and three partners, then on her own, she has been a force for the commercial exhibition of photography, ceramics, and textiles as art, and - perhaps most notably - has provided an uninterrupted outlet for the work of African American artists. After 42 years running a gallery here, through the recessions of the early 1980s, the early 1990s, and the early 2000s, Webster is finally closing.
NEWS
February 10, 2000 | by Renee Lucas Wayne, Daily News Staff Writer
You've bought dozens of framed posters at the mall over the years. You've dropped a couple of hundred dollars attending those in-home art demonstrations where consultants show prints "just like the one featured on 'The Cosby Show.'" Now you're ready to start collecting real art - honest-to-goodness original work by African-American artists of note. Admittedly, making that kind of commitment - and that kind of financial investment - may be as scary as it is exhilarating.
NEWS
February 11, 2000 | by Renee Lucas Wayne, Daily News Staff Writer
You've bought dozens of framed posters at the mall over the years. You've dropped a couple of hundred dollars attending those in-home art demonstrations where consultants show prints "just like the one featured on 'The Cosby Show.'" Now you're ready to start collecting real art - honest-to-goodness original work by African-American artists of note. Admittedly, making that kind of commitment - and that kind of financial investment - may be as scary as it is exhilarating.
NEWS
March 1, 1992 | By Jeffrey Fleishman, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Ellen Powell-Tiberino, Philadelphia's most prominent and prolific black female artist whose paintings reflected the rawness and grace of life, died Friday at her home after a 14-year battle with cancer. She was in her early 50s. Mrs. Tiberino, who worked out of her Powelton Village home, was a non- apologetic artist who forced the viewer to examine what was moving in the ordinary, such as her painting of an aging, overweight dancer who still seemed to glide effortlessly. "I paint life, and life is not always beautiful," she said in a 1988 interview.
LIVING
January 15, 1991 | By Linda Wright Moore, Daily News Columnist
Bill Cosby was a teen-ager in the Richard Allen Homes in North Philadelphia when Henry Tanner's painting "The Thankful Poor" was retrieved from the basement of the Pennsylvania School for the Deaf in Mount Airy in 1954. The school cleaned up the painting and loaned it to the Philadelphia Museum of Art. On Dec. 10, 1981, the School for the Deaf put the painting up for auction at Sotheby's. Cosby's wife, Camille, consulting with the Cosby family art curator, David Driskell, a professor of art at the University of Maryland, bought "The Thankful Poor" as a Christmas present for Cosby for $250,000 plus commissions - the highest price ever paid for a work by an African- American artist.
NEWS
December 18, 2009 | By Edward Colimore INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The Christmas party is on. Tomorrow's annual event to provide toys to needy children from Camden and other South Jersey communities was on the verge of being postponed by the Camden Rescue Mission this week. On Wednesday, at least 6,000 boys and girls had registered for gifts, but only a couple of thousand items had been collected. The mission's pastor, the Rev. Al Stewart, was praying for a miracle. And yesterday he got it. After word spread through The Inquirer and other media, phone calls, and personal visits, toys flooded in by the hundreds.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 6, 2006 | By ROBERT STRAUSS For the Daily News
WHEN STEPHANIE Daniel was growing up in Boston, going to visit relatives on Martha's Vineyard in Massachusetts every summer, the idea that there was an African-American art community was not really a part of her consciousness. "Sometimes people just want art that, when they come home, they get to see someone who looks like them, but sometimes, they just want something hanging up there that they like," said Daniel. So a few years ago, when she saw a painting of Gay Head, a section of Martha's Vineyard, that her friend Mercer Redcross had at his October Gallery in Old City, she knew she just had to have it. That it was painted by Chester-based African-American artist Sam Benson was just a plus.
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NEWS
October 30, 2012
Gudmund Vigtel, 87, pivotal director of the High Museum of Art in Atlanta, died Oct. 20 of cancer at his Atlanta home. He oversaw the museum's transformation from a modest regional institution housed in a simple brick building into one of the nation's most successful art museums, and shepherded its move to an architectural statement of a building designed by Richard Meier. Mr. Vigtel remained at the High for 28 years. Mr. Vigtel was named to the top post in 1963, a year after more than 100 Atlanta art patrons and their family members died in a plane crash.
NEWS
August 1, 2012 | Art Sanctuary and by Valerie V. Gay and Executive Director
ART SANCTUARY was founded in 1998 in North Philadelphia with the purpose of bringing African-American artists to speak, lecture and perform in a venue within the African-American community. As arts excellence rises out of the inner city, it ought to cycle through it. The purpose of this organization was to serve as the entity that connected communities — black, Latino, Asian, white; young, old; educated, non-educated — directly with African-American art and all that it entails, so that they could find themselves, their history and their culture within it. Art Sanctuary has continued to use the power of black art to transform individuals.
NEWS
October 16, 2011 | By Stephan Salisbury, Inquirer Culture Writer
For more than four decades, Sande Webster has been a torch on the Philadelphia art scene. First at Locust Street Gallery, founded by Webster and three partners, then on her own, she has been a force for the commercial exhibition of photography, ceramics, and textiles as art, and - perhaps most notably - has provided an uninterrupted outlet for the work of African American artists. After 42 years running a gallery here, through the recessions of the early 1980s, the early 1990s, and the early 2000s, Webster is finally closing.
NEWS
October 9, 2011 | By Edward J. Sozanski, Contributing Art Critic
As Bank of America expanded in recent decades by absorbing other banks, it built up a substantial collection of art once owned by those banks. The Philadelphia Museum of Art recently exhibited one such constituent collection, a group of watercolors by the 19th-century painter Alfred Jacob Miller. Through the end of the year, the African American Museum in Philadelphia is featuring another aspect of Bank of America's art holdings - paintings, works on paper, and a few sculptures and mixed-media pieces by African American artists.
LIVING
February 5, 2010 | By David Iams FOR THE INQUIRER
Black History Month will be marked Feb. 23 in New York with a major sale of works by African American artists, including several with Philadelphia ties. But earlier there will be another auction of local historic significance: the liquidation of Richman's Ice Cream in South Jersey's Salem County. The company's huge white art deco building near the intersection of Route 40 and Kings Highway, a few miles east of the Delaware Memorial Bridge, had long been not only a landmark but also a mecca for motorists who would go there to get the freshly produced ice cream that was distributed throughout the region.
NEWS
December 18, 2009 | By Edward Colimore INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The Christmas party is on. Tomorrow's annual event to provide toys to needy children from Camden and other South Jersey communities was on the verge of being postponed by the Camden Rescue Mission this week. On Wednesday, at least 6,000 boys and girls had registered for gifts, but only a couple of thousand items had been collected. The mission's pastor, the Rev. Al Stewart, was praying for a miracle. And yesterday he got it. After word spread through The Inquirer and other media, phone calls, and personal visits, toys flooded in by the hundreds.
LIVING
October 2, 2009 | By David Iams FOR THE INQUIRER
While Freeman's will be busy next week with a two-day catalog sale of fine English and Continental furniture, silver, and decorative arts, a catalog sale in New York will focus on an African American painter who developed his skills in Philadelphia, Barkley L. Hendricks. Hendricks will be represented Thursday in Swann Auction Galleries' sale of African American fine art. Born here in 1945, Hendricks is an alumnus of the Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts, earned his bachelor's and master's degrees from Yale University, and is a professor of art at Connecticut College.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 9, 2007 | By Venuri Siriwardane FOR THE INQUIRER
Nine African American students stand against a brilliantly colored backdrop. Courage is emblazoned at their feet. Clutching their books, they appear determined and ready to learn in an integrated environment. The scene, a serigraph by artist Charly Palmer, is titled Little Rock Nine - 50 Years, a piece commissioned to commemorate the enrollment of nine African American students at an Arkansas high school after the Supreme Court ruled that segregated schools offered inherently unequal education.
NEWS
December 17, 2006 | By Dwayne Campbell INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Saniah Johnson hopped from booth to booth at the 21st annual Philadelphia International Art Expo last month, taking in the plethora of paintings, sketches, serigraphs, sculptures and dolls created by African American artists. While Johnson, 32, appreciates the works of the Eakinses and Wyeths, she feels drawn to the richness of art from her culture. She already owns two pieces by Andrew Turner, the prolific Philadelphia artist who died in 2001, and is eager to expand her collection.
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