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NEWS
October 6, 1994 | by Renee Lucas Wayne, Daily News Staff Writer
The 100-plus prints that comprise "Alone in a Crowd: Prints by African- American Artists of the 1930s and '40s" speak volumes about the history and community of their creators. Thirty-eight artists - including Philadelphia-based Dox Thrash, inventor of a carbon etching process, and Raymond Steth, who also explored that technique - are represented. Their work reflects a rich variety of techniques, including lithography, screenprint, aquatint, woodblock, linoleum cut and wood engraving.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 31, 2003 | By ANNE R. FABBRI --Special to the Daily News
BLACK HISTORY Month inspires us to focus on African-American artists who are shaping our visual heritage. Here are some exhibits on display in February: African American Museum in Philadelphia 701 Arch St., 215-574-0380. "4 Artists of Distinction," on view until April 20, features superb work by four midcareer artists: Barbara Bullock, Charles Burwell, James Dupree and Martina Johnson-Allen. Bullock depicts performers, evoking the traditional rhythms of African music.
NEWS
February 21, 2000 | BY ALLAN L. EDMUNDS
In an attempt to cover Black History Month events and review the state of contemporary visual arts, your Yo! cover story (Feb. 10), it is clear from the choice of artists highlighted, that Renee Lucas Wayne relied on a small, commercially based cadre of experts to suggest who are the area's top African-American artists. Only in one instance, was there comment from a professional curator at a local nonprofit cultural institution. While not dealing directly in the commerce of art, institutions like the Philadelphia Museum of Art and African American Museum help establish value for the artists and their artwork by their choices in collecting.
NEWS
July 8, 2006 | By Gayle Ronan Sims INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Lucien Crump Jr., 71, founder of the first gallery in Philadelphia featuring African American artists and widely known for his depictions of Jesus as black, died of cancer Wednesday at his Germantown home. "We have lost a great part of our cultural community," said City Councilwoman Jannie Blackwell. "Lucien painted most of the portraits on the Wall of Respect in my office, including Dr. Martin Luther King, Malcolm X, Frederick Douglass and others. " Mr. Crump's best-known work is a painting of Jesus sitting behind a crystal cross, with the refracted image showing Jesus having the physical characteristics of the world's races: one eye is blue and the other is brown, his skin has many hues, and his hair is black, blond and colors in between.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 6, 1991 | By Renee Lucas Wayne, Daily News Staff Writer
Despite the recognition it generates yearly, Richard Jordan is one African- American artist who would just as soon do without Black History Month. Without it, he reasons, perhaps visual artists like himself could garner equal recognition during the other 11 months of the year. In his play "Missing Transparencies," Jordan addresses the frustration artists of color feel - and the quandary presented them by Black History Month, which he feels further segregates, rather than celebrates, their work.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 25, 1992 | By Edward J. Sozanski, INQUIRER ART CRITIC
It's always disappointing to encounter an exhibition based on a solid idea that doesn't quite realize its intentions. "First in the Heart Is the Dream," the first exhibition of the season at the Philadelphia Art Alliance, is such a show. It features one piece each by 54 African American artists. Its purpose, according to guest curators Sande Webster and Barbara Wallace, is to "trace the historical significance of work by leading 20-century African American artists with a Philadelphia heritage, celebrating their achievement and spirit.
NEWS
August 18, 2002 | By Victoria Donohoe INQUIRER ART CRITIC
Patronage of the visual arts in the United States has a history of substantial collections of art being gathered by individuals or groups in a relatively short time. That's totally unlike many of the great European collections formed by families or nations over a span of centuries. American collectors initially turned their attention to European and Asian art, then came to appreciate art produced in their own country after they had been moving architectural fragments from many parts of the world and restoring old villages on this side of the Atlantic.
NEWS
May 17, 1991 | by Don Russell, Daily News Staff Writer
Hubert C. Taylor, an architect whose work reflected both his technique and his art, will be fondly remembered today at a memorial service in a church of his design. Taylor, 53, a Society Hill resident, was found dead in his home Sunday. He had suffered from heart disease the past two years. Services will be at 11 this morning at Eastwick United Methodist Church, 8325 Lindbergh Blvd. Though Taylor built a career as an architect, he was also well known as an artist whose abstract expression often incorporated his theories of architectural design.
NEWS
May 4, 1988 | By RENEE V. LUCAS, Daily News Staff Writer
Ismail Abdul-Hamid's booming voice bounces off the pristine white walls of the Uptown Visual Arts Complex at 2221 N. Broad St. He immediately captures the attention of the visiting first graders from Lotus Academy in Germantown. "Welcome to the Africamericas art exhibition," he says, sounding like a your-wish-is-my-command genie from the movies. "I am Hamid, your curator. How are you today?" Meanwhile, Hamid's wife, Sharifa, is cleaning up a workshop space littered with remnants from a previous class's experience with "Mommy, I Made a Masterpiece" - the gallery tour, lecture and hands-on art workshop for children.
NEWS
February 12, 1997 | By Andy Wallace, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Raymond Steth, 79, of West Philadelphia, an artist whose lithographs are in the collections of the Philadelphia Museum of Art and the Smithsonian Institution, died of cancer Thursday at Graduate Hospital. In the 1930s and early 1940s, Mr. Steth worked in the graphics division of the Works Progress Administration's Federal Art Project, which operated community art centers for painters, sculptors and graphic artists. The program offered financial subsidies and creative freedom, he told an Inquirer reporter in 1991.
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NEWS
May 23, 2014 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON, Daily News Staff Writer morrisj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5573
ROLAND AYERS was one of those kids who seemed to be studiously bent over his schoolbooks in class, but in reality was hard at work drawing airplanes. Although he did well in school, Roland loved airplanes, and his schoolbooks were filled with drawings of all kinds of planes. His airborne pen-and-ink work dates back to the first grade, and his wife, Sheila Whitelaw Ayers, has drawings with his name written in a child's scrawl at the bottom. Of course, Roland went far beyond airplanes in a long and distinguished art career, creating what one critic called "magically surreal" works in pen and ink, watercolor, gouache and collage.
NEWS
February 18, 2013 | By Kathy Boccella, Inquirer Staff Writer
For many years, artist Lady Bird Strickland painted the people that she met in her life - and it was no ordinary life. Subjects such as Dizzy Gillespie, Josephine Baker, Charlie Parker, Marian Anderson, Miles Davis, and Duke Ellington were all part of the jazz bebop scene in Harlem where the young Georgia native danced and romanced in the 1940s, before putting it all down with brushstrokes. But by the 1980s - married, settled down in suburban Willingboro, and still painting - Strickland began to grasp that the New York jazz era that she had witnessed was just one scene in a much larger mural of the African American experience.
NEWS
July 8, 2006 | By Gayle Ronan Sims INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Lucien Crump Jr., 71, founder of the first gallery in Philadelphia featuring African American artists and widely known for his depictions of Jesus as black, died of cancer Wednesday at his Germantown home. "We have lost a great part of our cultural community," said City Councilwoman Jannie Blackwell. "Lucien painted most of the portraits on the Wall of Respect in my office, including Dr. Martin Luther King, Malcolm X, Frederick Douglass and others. " Mr. Crump's best-known work is a painting of Jesus sitting behind a crystal cross, with the refracted image showing Jesus having the physical characteristics of the world's races: one eye is blue and the other is brown, his skin has many hues, and his hair is black, blond and colors in between.
NEWS
January 11, 2005 | By Howard Shapiro INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The nation's newest museum building opens in Center City today as a part of the nation's oldest art museum, and when Kim Sajet took a walk into one of its vast galleries, the artworks spoke directly to her from the walls. This surprised even Sajet, who has been living, professionally, with the works of "The Chemistry of Color," a collection of art by 41 African American artists in Philadelphia from 1970 to 1990. But there she was yesterday morning, standing in the middle of the show with a group of docents from the Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts, giving them her curator's take on the work.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 31, 2003 | By ANNE R. FABBRI --Special to the Daily News
BLACK HISTORY Month inspires us to focus on African-American artists who are shaping our visual heritage. Here are some exhibits on display in February: African American Museum in Philadelphia 701 Arch St., 215-574-0380. "4 Artists of Distinction," on view until April 20, features superb work by four midcareer artists: Barbara Bullock, Charles Burwell, James Dupree and Martina Johnson-Allen. Bullock depicts performers, evoking the traditional rhythms of African music.
NEWS
August 18, 2002 | By Victoria Donohoe INQUIRER ART CRITIC
Patronage of the visual arts in the United States has a history of substantial collections of art being gathered by individuals or groups in a relatively short time. That's totally unlike many of the great European collections formed by families or nations over a span of centuries. American collectors initially turned their attention to European and Asian art, then came to appreciate art produced in their own country after they had been moving architectural fragments from many parts of the world and restoring old villages on this side of the Atlantic.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 31, 2002 | By ANNE R. FABBRI, For the Daily News
All the exhibitions in Old City galleries are new and exciting, featuring artists with a fresh vision and a role in shaping our culture, including many African-American artists. First Friday receptions between 6 and 8 p.m. provide a unique opportunity to meet these creative people and find out more about their work, so join the fun and visit the galleries in Old City between Front and 8th and Vine and Locust streets, with most of the galleries clustered on 2nd and 3rd streets and the cross streets in between.
NEWS
July 7, 2000 | by Anne R. Fabbri, For the Daily News
First Friday in Old City makes art the stellar attraction in a version of the traditional Italian passeggiata, the evening stroll around the main piazza before going to dinner after sundown. In Philadelphia, we have the galleries between Front and 6th, Vine and Locust streets, open to the public and welcoming all visitors. Join the fun and meet your friends in Old City. And later in the evening, there are restaurants and watering holes for everyone. Artists' House, 57 N. 2nd St., 215-923-8440 Group show of invited artists: David Baker, Michael Doyle, Frances Galante, Stefanie Lieberman, Kyle Margiota, Nhan Phung, Kate Brockman, Glenn Rudderow and others.
NEWS
June 2, 2000 | by Anne R. Fabbri, For the Daily News
June exhibitions in Old City galleries range from innovative new works by emerging artists to group encounters of gallery regulars. For some galleries, these are their summer shows, accompanied by covert nods to the coming Republican National Convention. Take advantage of First Friday gallery hours, generally from 5 to 9 p.m., to visit Old City galleries from Vine to Locust streets between Front and 6th. It's the perfect time of year to enjoy an evening stroll. Artists' House, 57 N. 2nd St., 215-923-8440 "Perspective," by Michael R. Bartman, revisits the workings of one-point perspective, which has been in existence since the Renaissance in Italy.
NEWS
February 21, 2000 | BY ALLAN L. EDMUNDS
In an attempt to cover Black History Month events and review the state of contemporary visual arts, your Yo! cover story (Feb. 10), it is clear from the choice of artists highlighted, that Renee Lucas Wayne relied on a small, commercially based cadre of experts to suggest who are the area's top African-American artists. Only in one instance, was there comment from a professional curator at a local nonprofit cultural institution. While not dealing directly in the commerce of art, institutions like the Philadelphia Museum of Art and African American Museum help establish value for the artists and their artwork by their choices in collecting.
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