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African American Museum

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NEWS
September 12, 2007 | By Vernon Clark INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The African American Museum in Philadelphia is set to receive a $3 million grant from the City of Philadelphia, officials announced yesterday. "This is a great gift for this museum at this time," said Ramona Riscoe Benson, president and chief executive officer of the museum at Seventh and Arch Streets in Center City. "It will allow us to make this building more appealing to visitors. " Riscoe Benson said the grant was the largest in the history of the museum, which opened in 1976.
NEWS
December 31, 2012 | By Maddie Hanna, Inquirer Staff Writer
As he placed a kinara on display at the African American Museum in Philadelphia Saturday, Mlanjeni Nduma paused to correct a child confused by the wooden candleholder's resemblance to a menorah. "No, it's not Hanukkah. It's Kwanzaa," Nduma, who was leading a Kwanzaa celebration at the museum, told the boy. "People say that all the time. " Though Kwanzaa dates to the mid-1960s, the seven-day celebration of African American culture, heritage, and family born out of the black nationalist movement still is unfamiliar to many people, Nduma said.
NEWS
September 14, 2001 | By Stephan Salisbury INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Terrie S. Rouse, president and chief executive of the African American Museum in Philadelphia, has resigned after four years leading the city's largest black museum, at Seventh and Arch Streets. Carol Lawrence, who runs the city's Office of Arts and Culture, will act as an interim museum director until a permanent successor to Rouse is found. Rouse's resignation came as a surprise to the museum community, although rumors of friction between Rouse and the museum board, headed by chairman Carl E. Singley, have circulated for some time.
NEWS
October 15, 2014 | By Stephan Salisbury, Inquirer Staff Writer
No punches are pulled on the top floor of the African American Museum in Philadelphia. No blinking. No turning away. Greeting the visitor are 15 life-size cement figures shackled together. Bits of twine, fabric, and stick weave through their stony skin. Men, women, and children are bound together, chained to a wooden pallet - goods ready for shipment. Visitors can wander through the silence of sculptor Stephen Hayes' installation, Cash Crop , listening to the unspoken but very visible history of slavery filling the gallery.
NEWS
March 14, 2005
EIGHT MONTHS AGO, the African American Museum in Philadelphia was close to collapse. Years of inconsistent leadership, financial instability and a disengaged board of directors had left the once-proud art institution on its knees, begging for help. Only a $135,000 advance from the city's annual $300,000 allotment kept the museum afloat. The crisis was serious; without major changes, the museum dies. Last week, the museum's new leadership announced a six-month "recovery plan" to bring more money, improved management and greater visibility to the 29-year-old museum.
NEWS
January 23, 2006 | By Vernon Clark INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Bolstered by a new leader and a financial-recovery plan, the African American Museum in Philadelphia is digging its way out of debt and hoping to regain its financial footing. The 45,000-square-foot museum, which features more than 750,000 African and African American artifacts and other historic and cultural items in four galleries, was nearly $500,000 in the red in 2004. Last year, the debt was down to $201,000. "We hope that by the end of the calendar year we will have all our debts satisfied," Romona Riscoe Benson, president and chief executive officer of the museum, at Seventh and Arch Streets in Center City, said in a recent interview.
NEWS
August 2, 2012 | By Vernon Clark, Inquirer Staff Writer
With the presentation of a small blue box, the African American Museum in Philadelphia received a giant national treasure Tuesday as it was lent the Congressional Gold Medal bestowed on Rosa Parks, known as the mother of the modern civil rights movement. "We could not be more honored than to have this piece of history here with us at our own African American Museum in Philadelphia," Mayor Nutter said of the medal, the highest civilian award bestowed by Congress. It was given to Parks in 1999.
NEWS
August 16, 2004
THE African American Museum in Philadelphia is in trouble. So what else is new? Rather than be a beacon for black art and history, the venue at 7th and Arch has become a conservatory of poor governance and frustration. In July, Harry Harrison, the museum's 14th executive director in 28 years, quit. This after he had to lay off staff and beg the city for a $150,000 advance on the annual $300,000 allotment it gives to the museum. The city gave $135,000. According to a 2002 audit, the museum had a $160,000 deficit, though the city and state ponied up $1 million, nearly half the museum's annual budget.
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ENTERTAINMENT
October 25, 2014 | By Monica Peters, For The Inquirer
Enjoy spooktacular sounds and artistry, in your favorite costume, Saturday at the Philadelphia Orchestra's Halloween Fantastique with Cirque de la Symphonie at the Kimmel Center for the Performing Arts. The orchestra will perform 10 pieces including Danny Elfman's Batman movie theme. Other featured works include Adam Glaser's "March of the Little Goblins," French composer Hector Berlioz's "March to the Scaffold" from Symphonie Fantastique , and Rimsky-Korsakov's "Dance of the Tumblers" from The Snow Maiden . Cirque de la Symphonie will perform acrobatic dance, and kids are encouraged to come in their Halloween costumes.
NEWS
October 15, 2014 | By Stephan Salisbury, Inquirer Staff Writer
No punches are pulled on the top floor of the African American Museum in Philadelphia. No blinking. No turning away. Greeting the visitor are 15 life-size cement figures shackled together. Bits of twine, fabric, and stick weave through their stony skin. Men, women, and children are bound together, chained to a wooden pallet - goods ready for shipment. Visitors can wander through the silence of sculptor Stephen Hayes' installation, Cash Crop , listening to the unspoken but very visible history of slavery filling the gallery.
NEWS
July 17, 2014 | By Vernon Clark, Inquirer Staff Writer
Growing up in West Philadelphia, Betty Leacraft was drawn to the look and feel of fabric and its many creative uses. "I've been sewing since I was a child," said Leacraft. "My maternal grandmother put the first needle and thread in my hand. " At Overbrook High School and Cheyney University, Leacraft developed a keen interest in African culture. Over the years, she combined those passions to create bold and colorful artwork as a fabric mixed-media artist. Later this month, Leacraft will visit South Africa, where one of her works will be part of an exhibit of art quilts in tribute to the late President Nelson Mandela.
NEWS
May 3, 2014 | By Stephan Salisbury, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Nutter administration, faced with rising concerns over postponed renovations to a Queen Village playground that sits atop one of the nation's most historically significant African American cemeteries, will host a public meeting Monday to hear from as many people as possible about the site's future. The 6:30 p.m. meeting, to be conducted by Mayor Nutter's chief of staff, Everett Gillison, will be at the African American Museum of Philadelphia, Seventh and Arch Streets. At issue is what should happen to Weccacoe Playground, which covers nearly an acre at Queen and Lawrence Streets, and Bethel Burial Ground, where more than 5,000 African Americans were buried between 1810 and the mid-1860s.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 26, 2014 | By Monica Peters, For The Inquirer
Leap over to Camden's Adventure Aquarium for a two-day celebration of Save the Frogs, part of the "Frogs: Nature's Messenger" exhibition. Proceeds will support the Save the Frogs Foundation. You will see more than 20 kinds of frogs, including the huge African bullfrog, the red-eyed tree frog, and the golden poison dart, and meet some of the colorful amphibians as they make an appearance with the aquarium's animal experts and biologists. To make the amphibian experience complete, there will also be a Frogger station, where visitors can play the '80s arcade game.
NEWS
March 31, 2014 | By Tirdad Derakhshani, Inquirer Staff Writer
Lucille and Harold never quite recovered from the loss of their son Jacob, who drowned on his eighth birthday. Now in their 70s, they have spent nearly half a century dealing with their regrets, their guilt, their anger. Then one day Jacob shows up at their door - still 8 years old. That's the heartrending premise of Jason Mott's best-selling debut novel, The Returned , an intimate portrait of scores of men, women, and children who inexplicably return from the dead. Released in August, it was issued in paperback Tuesday.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 18, 2014 | By A.D. Amorosi, For The Inquirer
When the Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr., the 20th century's saint of civil rights, told the world about the dreams he had, the list didn't include being lionized alongside American presidents such as Lincoln and Washington. It didn't include a holiday bearing his name on which all Americans, of whatever race, would celebrate the freedoms that only racial equality provides. While most of the MLK Monday holiday is dedicated to events humble, honorable, and often tinged with spirituality, there are parties throughout the weekend that include the sort of respectable dance-centric festivity worthy of King's potent message.
NEWS
October 20, 2013 | By Ashley Kuhn, Inquirer Staff Writer
John L. Wade Sr., 76, of Germantown, an award-winning artist and professor emeritus of the Temple University Tyler School of Art, died Monday, Oct. 7, at Good Shepherd Penn Partners in Philadelphia of complications from sarcoidosis. In addition to having received numerous awards, Mr. Wade's primarily abstract works were exhibited in galleries throughout the country, including the African American Museum in Philadelphia. Mr. Wade was born in Wilmington and graduated from Howard High School in 1955.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 25, 2013 | By A.D. Amorosi, For The Inquirer
This Thursday, the African American Museum opens a new exhibit titled "The Unflinching Eye: Works of the Tiberino Family Circle. " It tells the story of the Tiberino family and its links with the city, its African American community, and the city's artistic life. It's a long affair, still going, sometimes prickly, sometimes combative, ever explosively creative. On display is a half century of challenging social commentary from Powelton Village's first family of the mural, sometimes called the "West Philly Wyeths.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 17, 2013 | By Monica Peters, For The Inquirer
The East Coast Black Age of Comics Convention converges on Philadelphia in two locations on Friday and Saturday with an awards ceremony, comic books, workshops for kids, a costume contest, and more. Convention festivities from 6:30 to 9 p.m. Friday at the African American Museum will include a free reception along with the annual Glyph awards ceremony honoring African American icons in the comic book industry. The convention continues from 11 a.m. to 7 p.m. Saturday at the Enterprise Center in West Philadelphia, featuring the Kids' Library Zone (from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m.)
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