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African American Studies

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NEWS
April 19, 2013 | BY VALERIE RUSS, Daily News Staff Writer russv@phillynews.com, 215-854-5987
TEMPLE UNIVERSITY professor Molefi Kete Asante, who launched the nation's first doctoral program in African-American studies at Temple 25 years ago, will again chair the university's African-American studies department, he said Thursday. Asante served as department chair from 1984 to 1997, when he was ousted amid allegations of plagiarism - which he has said were unfounded. He has had a rocky relationship with Teresa Scott Soufas, dean of the College of Liberal Arts, since she arrived at Temple in 2007.
NEWS
October 14, 1998 | By James M. O'Neill, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Until she took an introductory course on African American studies at Temple University several years ago, Miriam Ma'at-Ka-Re Monges never dreamed she could make a career out of the field. But there Monges stood Monday, a West Philadelphia native, reporting to a group of African American scholars on her new book, Kush: The Jewel of Nubia, about an early African civilization that had been little studied. Like Monges, others in the room had earned their doctorates in African American studies from Temple and had traveled back to Philadelphia from their teaching posts at colleges and universities throughout the country.
NEWS
October 17, 1996 | By Howard Goodman, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Molefi K. Asante, whose pioneering advocacy of black studies has brought him both fame and controversy, will step down no later than June 30 as chairman of Temple University's African American studies department. Carolyn T. Adams, the dean of Temple's College of Arts and Sciences, said yesterday that all of the department's faculty members, including Asante, agreed with her office to launch a nationwide search for a successor. Asante will have spent 12 years as department head if he serves out the academic year.
NEWS
April 15, 2015 | BY CHAD DION LASSITER
  TEMPLE University is in trouble. The communities surrounding the North Philadelphia campus are up in arms about its expansion and displacement of black and brown people. Growing numbers of students are upset at everything from sexual harassment and violence against women to the state of African-American studies to the $15-an-hour wage. But the board of trustees and the top administrators seem to be out of touch and unwilling to hear the voices from the community or its students.
NEWS
August 14, 2012
Roy S. Bryce-Laporte, 78, a sociologist who led one of the nation's first African American studies departments, at Yale University, and did research that advanced understanding of blacks who came to the United States voluntarily rather than as slaves, died on July 31 in Sykesville, Md. His brother, Herrington J. Bryce, said that the cause was undetermined, but that he had had a series of small strokes. Dr. Bryce-Laporte was named director of Yale's new department of African American studies in 1969, when colleges and universities were recruiting black students and searching for ways to include their culture, history, and other concerns in the curriculum.
NEWS
October 30, 1998 | By Russell J. Rickford, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Harvard University philosopher and preeminent African American studies scholar Cornel West urged a brimming Rowan University audience yesterday not to wait until graduation to begin wrestling with America's enduring questions of race and class inequity. "There's still too much unjustified suffering in Glassboro, in L.A., in Moscow . . . in the world," West said, challenging nearly 1,000 students and faculty members gathered in Wilson Concert Hall to "situate yourself in a story bigger than you, locate yourself in a narrative grander than you. " The author of Race Matters and other books and essays on interracial relations, West, 45, appeared on campus for a talk sponsored jointly by Rowan's new president, Donald J. Farish, and its African American studies program.
NEWS
June 25, 1989 | By Chuck McDevitt, Special to The Inquirer
Molefi Kete Asante, professor and chair of African American studies at Temple University in Philadelphia, will serve as a Distinguished Scholar in Residence for six weeks this summer at the Delaware County campus of Pennsylvania State University in Middletown Township. Asante is one of 11 minority scholars who will participate this summer in Penn State's second annual Scholars in Residence program. Under the program, minority scholars will teach at Penn State campuses at University Park, New Kensington, Delaware County and Harrisburg.
NEWS
August 11, 2014 | BY VALERIE RUSS, Daily News Staff Writer russv@phillynews.com, 215-854-5987
IN YET ANOTHER blow to Temple University's African American Studies Department, another professor, Iyelli Ichile, has suddenly resigned - three weeks before the start of the new school year. Ichile, who taught African-American studies and served as the undergraduate chairwoman, resigned Monday, citing family reasons, according to department chairman Molefi Asante. Classes at Temple are set to begin Aug. 25. The department was the target of protests last spring over the firing of professor Anthony Monteiro.
NEWS
April 30, 2015 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON, Daily News Staff Writer morrisj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5573
JUNE 13, 2008, was a Friday - Friday the 13th - a day that lurks in the minds of the superstitious as a time when the evil forces that interfere with our destinies get free reign. Be that as it may, that particular Friday the 13th was bad news for hundreds of African-American parents because it was the day their cherished private school was forced to close. Ivy Leaf School, which began providing an education for African-American students at a reasonable cost from its founding in 1965, succumbed to economic forces beyond its control.
NEWS
August 10, 2014 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
A memorial celebration will be held Saturday, Aug. 9, for Gwendolyn B. Brightful, 92, of Yeadon, a retired educator and crusader in the Philadelphia School District. Mrs. Brightful, who developed the district's first curriculum in African American studies, died Wednesday, July 23, of Alzheimer's disease at her daughter's home in Charlotte, N.C. Her memorial service is set for 1 p.m. at Yeadon Presbyterian Church, 541 Holly Rd. Mrs. Brightful retired in 1986 after 32 years of service to the district.
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NEWS
April 30, 2015 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON, Daily News Staff Writer morrisj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5573
JUNE 13, 2008, was a Friday - Friday the 13th - a day that lurks in the minds of the superstitious as a time when the evil forces that interfere with our destinies get free reign. Be that as it may, that particular Friday the 13th was bad news for hundreds of African-American parents because it was the day their cherished private school was forced to close. Ivy Leaf School, which began providing an education for African-American students at a reasonable cost from its founding in 1965, succumbed to economic forces beyond its control.
NEWS
April 15, 2015 | BY CHAD DION LASSITER
  TEMPLE University is in trouble. The communities surrounding the North Philadelphia campus are up in arms about its expansion and displacement of black and brown people. Growing numbers of students are upset at everything from sexual harassment and violence against women to the state of African-American studies to the $15-an-hour wage. But the board of trustees and the top administrators seem to be out of touch and unwilling to hear the voices from the community or its students.
NEWS
November 21, 2014 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON, Daily News Staff Writer morrisj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5573
WILBERT McCABE memorized all the major streets of Philadelphia at age 6, took his first piano lessons at age 3 and performed with Paul Robeson at age 6. By 14, he was playing Grieg's Piano Concerto in a Philadelphia church. It was no wonder this brilliant child prodigy, musician and teacher had no problem remembering the birthdays of children, nieces and nephews, siblings, in-laws and friends. And the fact that every year he would send out 700 Christmas cards worldwide is not much of a surprise.
NEWS
August 11, 2014 | BY VALERIE RUSS, Daily News Staff Writer russv@phillynews.com, 215-854-5987
IN YET ANOTHER blow to Temple University's African American Studies Department, another professor, Iyelli Ichile, has suddenly resigned - three weeks before the start of the new school year. Ichile, who taught African-American studies and served as the undergraduate chairwoman, resigned Monday, citing family reasons, according to department chairman Molefi Asante. Classes at Temple are set to begin Aug. 25. The department was the target of protests last spring over the firing of professor Anthony Monteiro.
NEWS
August 10, 2014 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
A memorial celebration will be held Saturday, Aug. 9, for Gwendolyn B. Brightful, 92, of Yeadon, a retired educator and crusader in the Philadelphia School District. Mrs. Brightful, who developed the district's first curriculum in African American studies, died Wednesday, July 23, of Alzheimer's disease at her daughter's home in Charlotte, N.C. Her memorial service is set for 1 p.m. at Yeadon Presbyterian Church, 541 Holly Rd. Mrs. Brightful retired in 1986 after 32 years of service to the district.
NEWS
June 25, 2014 | BY CHAD DION LASSITER
IT'S ABOUT TIME Temple University President Neil Theobald came out of his bunker and responded to the call to reinstate Anthony Monteiro to his professorship in the Department of African American Studies. Do the right thing and reinstate the man immediately. An impressive coalition of students, labor leaders, community activists, elected officials, faith leaders and philanthropists have spoken in one voice (a rare occurrence in this town). But it appears that President Theobald and his administration are deaf.
NEWS
April 19, 2013 | BY VALERIE RUSS, Daily News Staff Writer russv@phillynews.com, 215-854-5987
TEMPLE UNIVERSITY professor Molefi Kete Asante, who launched the nation's first doctoral program in African-American studies at Temple 25 years ago, will again chair the university's African-American studies department, he said Thursday. Asante served as department chair from 1984 to 1997, when he was ousted amid allegations of plagiarism - which he has said were unfounded. He has had a rocky relationship with Teresa Scott Soufas, dean of the College of Liberal Arts, since she arrived at Temple in 2007.
NEWS
March 24, 2013 | By Hillel Italie and Jon Gambrell, Associated Press
Chinua Achebe, 82, the internationally celebrated Nigerian author, statesman, and dissident, died Thursday in Boston after a brief illness. He lived through times of traumatic change in Nigeria and Africa. Among his many honored works, his novel Things Fall Apart has become the most widely read novel by an African. Mr. Achebe knew both the prestige of serving on government commissions and the fear of being declared an enemy of the state. He spent much of his adult life in the United States, but never stopped calling for democracy in Nigeria or resisting literary honors from a government he refused to accept.
NEWS
August 14, 2012
Roy S. Bryce-Laporte, 78, a sociologist who led one of the nation's first African American studies departments, at Yale University, and did research that advanced understanding of blacks who came to the United States voluntarily rather than as slaves, died on July 31 in Sykesville, Md. His brother, Herrington J. Bryce, said that the cause was undetermined, but that he had had a series of small strokes. Dr. Bryce-Laporte was named director of Yale's new department of African American studies in 1969, when colleges and universities were recruiting black students and searching for ways to include their culture, history, and other concerns in the curriculum.
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