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African Art

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NEWS
May 22, 2016
Creative Africa Through Sept. 25 in the Museum of Art Perelman Building, 2525 Pennsylvania Ave. Hours: 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Tuesday through Sunday. Admission: Adults, $20; seniors (65 and over), $18; students and youths (13-18), $14; children, free. Information: 215-763-8100 or www.philamuseum.org .
NEWS
October 15, 1999 | BY LAOLU AKANDE
Chris Ofili's 1996 painting, "The Holy Virgin Mary," now on exhibition at the Brooklyn Museum, made of acrylic, oil, paper collage, resin and elephant dung on linen, has been traced to the artist's African descent. Especially so because of the consistent use of elephant dung in his work. There is the popular belief, especially in the West, that Africa is all jungle, and the elephant is king of the jungle. In most parts of Africa, the elephant is a symbol of strength, and its dung could be seen as regenerative because it is manure and can fertilize.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 29, 1987 | By Edward J. Sozanski, Inquirer Art Critic
At its heart, every art object is indefinable; if it weren't so, it wouldn't be art. It's this indefinable essence that artists attempt to convey, as an alternative to spoken and written language. As a language, however, art is maddeningly imprecise. There are rewards in this ambiguity, however, for art stimulates the imagination, the intellect and the emotions in a rich variety of ways. Susan Vogel, executive director of the Center for African Art in New York, demonstrates this in a novel and refreshing way through an exhibition called "Perspectives: Angles on African Art," on view at the center, 54 E. 68th St., through Jan. 3. "Perspectives" is not about African art per se; it's about the art audience.
NEWS
June 16, 2001 | By David Iams FOR THE INQUIRER
In a sale of unusual significance, Associated Auctioneers will sell the contents of an out-of-state museum devoted to the art of central and western Africa. Beginning at noon next Saturday at the Rivers Edge Memorial Center near the Tacony Palmyra Bridge, more than 500 lots will be offered, several of them of historic significance and two of them expected to sell for as much as $150,000. Important African art is not often sold at auction, certainly not locally and certainly not by an auction company more often involved in industrial liquidations.
NEWS
June 9, 2016 | By Stephan Salisbury, Staff Writer
Timothy Rub, director of the Philadelphia Museum of Art, and Julian Siggers, Rub's counterpart at the Penn Museum, may agree or disagree on most anything. But they are of one opinion about their current collaborative effort, "Look Again: Contemporary Perspectives on African Art," an exhibition of selected works from the Penn Museum's collection of African art and artifacts, now on view at the Philadelphia Museum of Art. "I am very excited about further collaborations after this," said Siggers.
NEWS
July 25, 1993 | By Victoria Donohoe, INQUIRER ART CRITIC
Bryn Mawr College has turned its eye on African and Pacific art this season with an exhibit to commemorate a major gift of 100-plus pieces it recently received from the Neufeld Family Foundation, Beverly Hills, Calif. Hollywood film producer Mace Neufeld and his wife, Helen Katz Neufeld (Bryn Mawr, Class of 1953), both then New Yorkers, began collecting pre-Columbian art 40 years ago while still at college. Attracted to the sculptural form such pieces had, they soon turned to African art. Initially they bought slowly, started studying, and built an art library on the subject, while visiting collections of such material here and in Europe.
NEWS
May 23, 2016 | By Tom Hines
One of the first things visitors encounter in "Look Again: Contemporary Perspectives on African Art," the centerpiece exhibition of the five-show " Creative Africa " event at the Philadelphia Museum of Art, is a diviner's kit. The kit, from the Ovimbundu culture of Angola, consists of an array of seemingly miscellaneous objects, including some tiny figurines, a colored crystalline rock, and a number of more enigmatic items. The diviner carried them in a basket, and when someone sought his advice or predictions, he tossed them out. His skill was in looking at how they landed and interpreting the position and juxtaposition of the objects in a way that was useful to those who sought his services.
LIVING
August 9, 2000 | By Edward J. Sozanski, INQUIRER ART CRITIC
For various reasons, African art hasn't been a priority at the Philadelphia Museum of Art, but four promised gifts of top-quality African objects have catalyzed a move to create such a display. The gifts have come as part of a campaign to celebrate the museum's 125th anniversary next year with donations of "collection-transforming" gifts of art. The four African gifts consist of two Baule masks, a Dogon door, an Ashanti king's stool, and a Bakota reliquary figure. The masks and the door are promised gifts of trustee Harvey S. Shipley Miller, chairman of the anniversary gift committee, and J. Randall Plummer.
NEWS
September 5, 1993 | By Edward J. Sozanski, INQUIRER ART CRITIC
Since early in this century, Western artists and art historians, following the example of Picasso and Modigliani, have been enthusiastic over the visual complexity and invention of African sculpture. They have been far less considerate of its spiritual aspect, however. The task of placing African sculpture and ritual objects in their proper social context has been left to anthropologists. This is curious, because no art historian would regard the iconography of Christian altarpieces or Dutch still-lifes as being beyond his or her ken. Yet African art has been treated differently.
NEWS
December 10, 1995 | By Victoria Donohoe, INQUIRER ART CRITIC
Some exhibits mark a significant point in the life's journey and achievement of an art collector. The display of 30 traditional tribal masks and sculptures, along with newer pieces and textiles, from the African art collection of Donald Wheeler Wyatt of Winter Park, Fla., is such an exhibit. Nearly a third of Wyatt's holdings are on view at Swarthmore College in the collection's first showing outside Florida. Wyatt, 89, is a professor emeritus of sociology and a lecturer in African studies at Tennessee's Maryville College.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
June 9, 2016 | By Stephan Salisbury, Staff Writer
Timothy Rub, director of the Philadelphia Museum of Art, and Julian Siggers, Rub's counterpart at the Penn Museum, may agree or disagree on most anything. But they are of one opinion about their current collaborative effort, "Look Again: Contemporary Perspectives on African Art," an exhibition of selected works from the Penn Museum's collection of African art and artifacts, now on view at the Philadelphia Museum of Art. "I am very excited about further collaborations after this," said Siggers.
NEWS
May 23, 2016 | By Tom Hines
One of the first things visitors encounter in "Look Again: Contemporary Perspectives on African Art," the centerpiece exhibition of the five-show " Creative Africa " event at the Philadelphia Museum of Art, is a diviner's kit. The kit, from the Ovimbundu culture of Angola, consists of an array of seemingly miscellaneous objects, including some tiny figurines, a colored crystalline rock, and a number of more enigmatic items. The diviner carried them in a basket, and when someone sought his advice or predictions, he tossed them out. His skill was in looking at how they landed and interpreting the position and juxtaposition of the objects in a way that was useful to those who sought his services.
NEWS
May 22, 2016
Creative Africa Through Sept. 25 in the Museum of Art Perelman Building, 2525 Pennsylvania Ave. Hours: 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Tuesday through Sunday. Admission: Adults, $20; seniors (65 and over), $18; students and youths (13-18), $14; children, free. Information: 215-763-8100 or www.philamuseum.org .
NEWS
March 11, 2016 | By Stephan Salisbury, Staff Writer
The Barnes Foundation will show a mid-career retrospective this summer of the work of Nari Ward, filling its special exhibition space with Ward's idiosyncratic assemblages, installations, and sculptures fashioned from objects found around the 52-year-old artist's New York neighborhood. "Sun Splashed," on view from June 24 to Aug. 22, features more than 30 works. Thom Collins, Barnes executive director and president, said the Ward exhibition would create "a fascinating dialogue" with the Barnes' permanent collection, including the foundation's potent holdings of African art. "With the content of the collection, the context it provides, and Dr. Barnes' history of supporting African American culture and the Harlem Renaissance," Collins said, "there are many interesting connections to explore through the contemporary lens of the show.
NEWS
October 9, 2015 | By A.D. Amorosi, For The Inquirer
To be exalted is to be superior and eminent beyond all others. For Carl Hancock Rux, the spoken-word poet, playwright, and recording artist, exaltation has come in recounting the life and times of German Jewish art historian Carl Einstein. The vehicle: a theater piece called The Exalted , a collaboration with composer/musician Theo Bleckmann running at the Kimmel Center's SEI Innovation Studio through Saturday. Einstein (1885-1940) was an influential European critic, one of the first to show appreciation for African art with his 1915 book Negerplastik ("Negro sculpture")
NEWS
January 10, 2015 | By Stephan Salisbury, Inquirer Culture Writer
In 1898, the then-relatively unknown black artist Henry Ossawa Tanner exhibited a monumental painting, The Annunciation , in the annual Paris Salon, where it was viewed with enthusiasm by French critics and visiting Philadelphians. The Philadelphia Museum of Art bought the painting in 1899 - its first purchase of work by an African American, and Tanner's first inclusion in the collection of an American museum. More than a century later, The Annunciation has entered the canon of American visual art, and the museum continues to acquire works by African American artists at an ever-increasing pace.
NEWS
November 16, 2014
ISSUE | FAMILIES Lifestyle choice Instead of using prominent space on Page 3 to inform us of anything going on in the world, The Inquirer tells us about a woman with terminal cancer - with whom I do sympathize - who wants children, pursues in-vitro fertilization, has her cousin carry and birth the twins, and states that she will not let cancer make her life choices ("Starting a family against odds," Nov. 9). And when we pro-lifers gather in Washington in the hundreds of thousands to ask for the repeal of a law that would allow more children the chance to be born, we barely get a sentence.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 10, 2014 | By Howard Gensler
"INTERSTELLAR" may have been the movie adults were excited about this past weekend, but once again kids rule the box office! The animated "Big Hero 6" debuted in first place with $56.2 million, according to studio estimates yesterday. Director Christopher Nolan 's brainy space saga, starring Matthew McConaughey and Anne Hathaway as very attractive astronauts, took off in second place with $50 million, estimates said. "Interstellar" opened below Nolan's last film, the mind-bending thriller "Inception," which conjured up $62.8 million when it debuted in 2010.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 17, 2014
WE WOULD have guessed it's the food trucks. Why else would Playboy magazine anoint the University of Pennsylvania with the coveted No. 1 ranking in its annual list of the nation's Top Party Schools? The poll is in the mag's October issue, which hits Friday. It's not jealousy that motivates Temple Tattle (a/k/a this reporter) to question how in the world the school on the wrong side of the Schuylkill earned what appears to be such an undeserved accolade. It's sheer incredulity.
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