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NEWS
May 29, 2005 | By Michael Klein INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Twenty years after Philadelphia hosted one of two Live Aid concerts that dramatized the plight of starving Africans, a second big-name benefit is in the works. It will be July 2 on Ben Franklin Parkway, in the middle of the city's jam-packed Fourth of July festivities, according to Deborah Bolling, Mayor Street's spokeswoman. A news conference is scheduled for Tuesday morning at City Hall to announce "Live 8," which will coincide with a show in London, said Laura Perez, the publicist who is handling the news conference.
NEWS
March 12, 1992 | By Melanie Brodus, INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
A four-year, $40 million aid package designed to improve development, teaching and banking in sub-Saharan Africa was announced here yesterday by congressional sponsors of the aid package and the Rev. Leon H. Sullivan, author of the Sullivan Principles. The Agency for International Development, a State Department agency, will provide aid valued at $30 million spread over four years. An additional $10 million will be given by private investors. "This is just one step toward turning Africa around and lifting her from the bottom of the barrel," said Mr. Sullivan, a longtime advocate of African development whose Sullivan Principles provided a guideline for companies doing business in South Africa.
NEWS
July 7, 2005
A "CAN-DO" attitude - pronounced attytood - looks good on the city of Philadelphia. Darn good. City officials had every right to congratulate themselves for the smart and creative planning that went into hosting - and cleaning up after - two huge crowds on the Parkway on two separate days. And so the Live 8 concert on July 2 followed by the Fourth of July concert headlined by Elton John reached the goals of raising awareness of issues of poverty in Africa and of HIV/AIDS. Philadelphia had to scramble to pull off a huge party in only 32 days, but it did so with gusto.
NEWS
November 9, 1989 | By Lisa Scheid, Special to The Inquirer
In 1962, at the age of 22, Haskell Ward decided he wanted to change the world. So he joined Operation Crossroads, a Peace Corps-type organization, and traveled to Africa. More than 25 years later, Ward has seen changes - but not exactly the ones he expected. "The world was a different place then," Ward said during a speech to about 100 students at the Lincoln University Center for Public Policy and Diplomacy on Tuesday. "No one could have seen the sharp turn the world would take against Africa, African-Americans or the poor.
BUSINESS
June 9, 2006 | By Akweli Parker INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Fewer than three years have passed since the West African nation of Liberia emerged from back-to-back civil wars that killed more than 200,000 and wrecked its economy. Now, "it needs everything - electrical grids, roads, schools," said Stanley Straughter, chairman of the Mayor's Commission on African and Caribbean Affairs. And so Liberian Ambassador Alexander Wallace, along with representatives from three other African countries, will tell Philadelphia-area businesses, during a round-table talk tomorrow, what the countries need and how the local firms can benefit.
NEWS
May 29, 1986 | From Inquirer Wire Services
Western powers, led by the United States, yesterday withheld full support for a costly plan to encourage economic recovery in economically depressed Africa, and instead called for more free enterprise there. Secretary of State George P. Shultz joined officials from Britain, West German and Japan in urging that African countries emphasize the economic self- reliance of free enterprise and abandon what he called discredited orthodoxies of state direction. "No amount of foreign assistance and no measure of good intentions can alleviate the hardship caused by a government bent on misguided policies," Shultz said during the second day of an unprecedented General Assembly session held to help drought-stricken Africa.
NEWS
January 9, 1987
Libya's Moammar Gadhafi is helping the West by showing his true colors in neighboring Chad. His bloody intervention there is so outrageous, and so blatant, that it provides a technicolor advertisement of the need for Western and Third World cooperation in curbing the colonel's adventurism. Seven thousand Libyan troops entered northern Chad in 1980 to back one side in a civil war, but left after many African countries expressed sharp disapproval. The Libyans came back in 1983, spurring France to send 3,500 troops to southern Chad to aid its former colony and prevent Libya from taking control of the whole country.
NEWS
April 20, 2000 | By Jackie Koszczuk, INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
When President Clinton announced in Seattle in December that the United States no longer would block poor African nations from getting access to cheap versions of AIDS drugs, gay activists and consumer groups claimed victory over the powerful U.S. pharmaceutical industry. It turns out their celebration was premature; the conflict simply moved to the backrooms of Congress, where a group of influential lawmakers is trying to erect barriers to countries that want to manufacture or import inexpensive versions of drugs patented by U.S. pharmaceutical giants.
NEWS
March 17, 2001
Everyone loves to hate a drug company . . . and the guilt of the drug companies is assumed, like a truth universally acknowledged. . . . The case against the drug companies . . . appears to have been strengthened by their offer, under pressure from an Indian manufacturer of generic drugs, to cut yet further their prices to African countries of antiviral drugs for AIDS.. . . The fundamental or underlying objection to drug companies is that they are in the business to make profit rather than to alleviate suffering.
NEWS
March 25, 1995 | by Valerie M. Russ, Daily News Staff Writer
You're a well-informed American, familiar with the world's hot spots and controversies. You know all about the conflict in Bosnia, and even know what's going on in Somalia. Right? But did you know that: Human Rights Watch has condemned Mauritania for the forced deportation of thousands of its black citizens and for the killings of hundreds of others? The Sahrawi people in the Western Sahara say they live in occupied territory and have been fighting for independence from Morrocan control?
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NEWS
February 22, 2013 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON, Daily News Staff Writer morrisj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5573
HENRY PRINCE Murphy was a man of many talents and accomplishments, with a major focus on serving his fellow human being. He was an auditor and accountant by trade, but you wouldn't have wanted to tell him he had condemned himself to a life without adventure, not when he was boarding a plane for Ethiopia to help the Rev. Leon Sullivan set up development projects for Third World countries. And not when he was teaching business courses at local schools, or painting portraits of family members, or working in various civic enterprises to help minority businesses, abused women or any number of other programs of benefit to the underserved.
BUSINESS
October 5, 2012 | By Joseph N. DiStefano, Inquirer Staff Writer
Africa, with growing cities, oilfields, mines, and fractious governments, needs engineers, teachers - and lobbyists? "It is difficult to start a business [in many African countries], since the governments charge countless fees and nickel-and-dime you every step of the way. If a company is successful, it is forced to pay bribes," says Christine Mahoney , a University of Virginia professor, Bucks County native, and Penn State graduate who just got back from Tanzania. Small business depends on property, tax, and licensing rules and other basics of capitalism.
NEWS
July 17, 2008 | By JACK SMITH For the Daily News
IN THE SAFARI camps of Botswana, the first thing they tell you is to stay on the wooden walkways that wind their way through the jungle some five and six feet off the ground. As long as you do, they say, the lions and leopards with whom you share the leafy forest will leave you alone. It is a different story in Uganda, where it takes more than an elevated sidewalk to discourage the big cats. In fact, the country is home to a breed of carnivores known as "tree-climbing" lions for reasons that became evident as we motored out of Uganda's Kibale National Park.
NEWS
March 4, 2008 | By Jonathan Zimmerman
"Ghana Loves Obama. " I saw that on a bumper sticker last month during President Bush's brief visit here. Wherever Bush went on his five-nation African tour, talk of Obama followed him. "It seemed like there was a lot of excitement for me - wait a minute, maybe you missed it!" Bush quipped, when Tanzanian reporters asked about Obama. There was indeed a lot of excitement for President Bush, a popular figure across most of the continent. Yet it was dwarfed by the enthusiasm for Obama, who would become the first American president of African descent.
NEWS
June 28, 2007 | Daily News wire services
Pollster: 'Anti-Americanism' has 'deepened,' not 'widened' PARIS - Distrust of the United States has intensified across the world, but overall views of America remain favorable among majorities in 25 of 46 countries and the Palestinian territories surveyed in an international poll conducted in April and May by the Pew Research Center. "Anti-Americanism since 2002 has deepened, but it hasn't really widened," said Andrew Kohut, director of the Pew Global Attitudes Project.
BUSINESS
June 9, 2006 | By Akweli Parker INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Fewer than three years have passed since the West African nation of Liberia emerged from back-to-back civil wars that killed more than 200,000 and wrecked its economy. Now, "it needs everything - electrical grids, roads, schools," said Stanley Straughter, chairman of the Mayor's Commission on African and Caribbean Affairs. And so Liberian Ambassador Alexander Wallace, along with representatives from three other African countries, will tell Philadelphia-area businesses, during a round-table talk tomorrow, what the countries need and how the local firms can benefit.
NEWS
August 4, 2005 | Desmond Tutu
Desmond Tutu is archbishop emeritus of Cape Town, South Africa, and a winner of the 1984 Nobel Peace Prize The cameras are rolling on another African disaster: Niger and its desperate, starving children. And this tragedy has unfolded on the world's television screens even as leaders of the industrialized countries at the Group of Eight summit pledged a historic amount of debt relief and humanitarian aid to African countries. Welcome tidings of the affluent world's largess have collided with yet another outstretched hand - another cry for help - from our continent.
NEWS
July 7, 2005
A "CAN-DO" attitude - pronounced attytood - looks good on the city of Philadelphia. Darn good. City officials had every right to congratulate themselves for the smart and creative planning that went into hosting - and cleaning up after - two huge crowds on the Parkway on two separate days. And so the Live 8 concert on July 2 followed by the Fourth of July concert headlined by Elton John reached the goals of raising awareness of issues of poverty in Africa and of HIV/AIDS. Philadelphia had to scramble to pull off a huge party in only 32 days, but it did so with gusto.
NEWS
June 7, 2005
AM I HAPPY there will be a concert here focusing on the African countries that have genocide, national debt and health issues? Yes, but if America spent a tenth of what we've spent in Iraq on countries that have these problems, imagine how different our image would be around the world than the one we have now: A bible thumping, oil-crazed nation that drops the ball on important issues and at the same time lectures the world on everything....
NEWS
June 5, 2005
The glittering roster of stars who will be in Philadelphia and four European cities for the free Live 8 concerts on July 2 guarantees a musical mega-event. But that isn't why the concert is so noteworthy - and why Philadelphia can be proud to be its American host. Live 8 stands out because of its goal: sparking worldwide public pressure on behalf of ending extreme poverty in Africa. The targets of that pressure - and the origin of the concert's name - are the leaders who will attend the G-8 summit of industrialized nations next month in Scotland.
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