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African Women

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ENTERTAINMENT
November 27, 1987 | By Desmond Ryan, Inquirer Movie Critic
The originality of Desire Ecare's Faces of Women springs from its country of origin. Ecare is a filmmaker from the Ivory Coast who trained in Paris and then went home to work at a succession of jobs to help fund his fledgling career as a director. Faces of Women took him 12 years, and it's an all too rare example of native African cinema - very little of which makes it out of Africa and onto our screens. Ecare has said he believes in a form of movie nationalism in which African directors look to their own culture and resources and shun the idea of imitating models from abroad.
NEWS
October 15, 2006 | By Carolyn Davis
Men have done mighty things in Africa. All but one of that continent's elected leaders have been men; their actions have stirred and stopped progress from the top down. That all-male club was busted open last year after Liberians chose Ellen Johnson-Sirleaf, grandmother and international finance expert, as president. But Johnson-Sirleaf only brought to the surface a movement long in progress. It's not well known - and yet one of the most encouraging things on the continent. Perhaps it's culture (men do dominate national politics)
ENTERTAINMENT
January 12, 2007 | By Kristen A. Graham INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Conjure up a mental image of African art, and you probably don't think of a striking photograph snapped by a Namibian woman, or a textured vase created by a woman from Ghana. "African art is almost always the art of men," said Romona Riscoe Benson, president and chief executive of the African American Museum in Philadelphia. An exhibition set to open at the museum today seeks to alter that image. "The Art of African Women: Empowering Traditions" features more than 100 photographs by the acclaimed photojournalist Margaret Courtney-Clarke, as well as pottery, textiles, beadwork and other decorative arts created by women from all over Africa.
NEWS
February 25, 2001 | By Melanie D. Scott, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Although Black History Month is celebrated mostly in the United States, American embassies around the world also host programs during February to educate others about the role African Americans have had in U.S. history and the influence of the African diaspora on cultures across the globe. People like Gloria Harper Dickinson, an associate professor and chair of The College of New Jersey's African American Studies Department in Ewing, Mercer County, have been invited abroad to share their knowledge.
NEWS
November 20, 2005 | By Shashank Bengali INQUIRER FOREIGN STAFF
On a continent where women suffer in nearly every measure of health and welfare, Ellen Johnson-Sirleaf's apparent election to the presidency of war-torn Liberia is raising hopes for a new era in African politics: the era of women. "It's a breakthrough for African women," said Florence Butegwa, West Africa director for the United Nations Development Fund for Women. "We haven't had a role model in terms of political leadership at that highest level. " Johnson-Sirleaf would be Africa's first elected female president.
NEWS
August 3, 1994 | by Renee Lucas Wayne, Daily News Staff Writer
Sisters are doin' it for themselves. That's the message coming out of North Philly on Sunday mornings, when beautiful urban women gather for "A Woman's Point of View. " The weekly workout session, at 7:30 a.m. sharp on Temple University's track at 15th Street and Montgomery Avenue, is a series of free, healthy togetherness activities for neighborhood women. From 7:30 to 8:10, females ranging in age from 9 to 76 engage in low-impact aerobics. A juice break comes at 8:10, providing an opportunity for fellowship, to find out about upcoming community events, and meet the 10 to 15 newcomers who come each week.
NEWS
August 1, 1994 | By Greg McCullough, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Several hundred residents celebrated the first Roosevelt Drive Afrikan Festival on Saturday with a variety of games, dances and speeches that focused on restoring unity in the township's African American community. "Neighbors should know each other, help each other, and be more conscious of their surroundings," said Clarisa Rodrigues-Coelho, 18, a Roosevelt Drive resident who spoke at the festival, which is expected to be an annual event. Unity was the central theme, perhaps best expressed in the synchronous movements of four traditional African basket dancers.
NEWS
June 12, 2002 | By EILEEN MITCHELL
I'M TIRED. I'm tired of being a female who can't walk my dog in the afternoon without fear that someone might grab me from behind and force me into their car. Of having to think twice about where I park my own car. Not next to a van, police say, because someone could be hiding in there waiting for me. Not far from the lights because darkness is a shield for evil. Not in a deserted area, because seclusion invites trouble. I shouldn't even drive in the evening, I'm told, unless there is someone to escort me to my car. I'm tired of being told to carry pepper spray or mace if an escort isn't available.
NEWS
February 22, 2013
A FEW MINUTES into my wandering around the Wangechi Mutu exhibit at Drexel University, I was stopped in my tracks at the sight of the artist doing what looked to me like the desecration of a perfectly good chocolate cake. Mutu, in a videotaped performance-art piece at the newly expanded Leonard Pearlstein Gallery, can be seen smooshing her hands around in the cake and even walking on it while wearing a pair of Lucite platform shoes. In the center of the gallery, there's a hanging collection of what appear to be makeshift soccer balls suspended from the ceiling with twine.
NEWS
April 29, 1996 | BY MOLLY IVINS
The United States currently allows around 775,000 legal immigrants annually into our country. That's 0.3 percent of our population. But the number who actually come every year has been dropping. According to published reports, legal immigration has been dropping for four consecutive years. The late Barbara Jordan, who headed the U.S. Commission on Immigration Reform, recommended that the number be dropped to 500,000, but since the number is going down anyway, there doesn't seem much reason for it. We've always gotten more than we've given from our immigrants.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
January 29, 2016 | By Craig R. McCoy, Staff Writer
For the first time, two African American women will serve as the top judges in the Philadelphia court system, the state Supreme Court decided Wednesday. The high court appointed Judge Jacqueline F. Allen as administrative judge of the trial division of Common Pleas Court, which includes the system's busiest and most prestigious criminal and civil courtrooms. The court named Judge Sheila A. Woods-Skipper, already the president judge of Common Pleas Court, to chair the system's administrative governing board.
NEWS
February 22, 2013
A FEW MINUTES into my wandering around the Wangechi Mutu exhibit at Drexel University, I was stopped in my tracks at the sight of the artist doing what looked to me like the desecration of a perfectly good chocolate cake. Mutu, in a videotaped performance-art piece at the newly expanded Leonard Pearlstein Gallery, can be seen smooshing her hands around in the cake and even walking on it while wearing a pair of Lucite platform shoes. In the center of the gallery, there's a hanging collection of what appear to be makeshift soccer balls suspended from the ceiling with twine.
NEWS
March 16, 2012 | By Kristin E. Holmes, Inquirer Staff Writer
When Cheryl L. Austin and Keir Bradford-Grey embarked on post-law school paths, they initially chose two different sides of the courtroom. Austin stood before judges as a prosecutor in Montgomery County. Bradford-Grey argued on behalf of defendants who could not afford a lawyer in Philadelphia and Delaware. But years after separately beginning their legal careers, they achieved historic milestones together in 2012. Austin became the first African American woman to serve as a judge in the Court of Common Pleas in Montgomery County when she took the oath of office in January.
NEWS
May 10, 2009 | By Yvonne B. Haskins
As I have for many years, today I will walk in the Susan G. Komen Race for the Cure. It's been invigorating to see the growth of this event over the years, with young and old, male and female breast-cancer survivors, and women of every size, shape, and form participating. Yet every time, I wonder why I see so few black people, especially women. As a black woman, I'm keenly uncomfortable that so few of us show up to support a fight against a disease that's killing a higher percentage of young black women than it is among white women.
NEWS
July 26, 2007 | By Elizabeth Wellington, Inquirer Fashion Writer
Celebrity hair. Long, luxurious celebrity hair that bounces like Beyoncé's. Moves like Mary's and twirls like Tyra's. Everybody seems to want it. But for many women, especially African American, a coif of silky, back-length locks that never sweats out (in other words, gets frizzy) and holds a curl for days can only be bought. And then it must be braided, woven or glued in. Enter the latest must-have in millennium black hair care: the lace-front wig. "I think they are the best because the hair is so human looking and I can do lots of styles," said Shawna Webb, 24, who works in real estate.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 12, 2007 | By Kristen A. Graham INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Conjure up a mental image of African art, and you probably don't think of a striking photograph snapped by a Namibian woman, or a textured vase created by a woman from Ghana. "African art is almost always the art of men," said Romona Riscoe Benson, president and chief executive of the African American Museum in Philadelphia. An exhibition set to open at the museum today seeks to alter that image. "The Art of African Women: Empowering Traditions" features more than 100 photographs by the acclaimed photojournalist Margaret Courtney-Clarke, as well as pottery, textiles, beadwork and other decorative arts created by women from all over Africa.
NEWS
October 19, 2006 | By Annette John-Hall INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
I tell you the truth, if you have faith as small as a mustard seed, you can say to this mountain, "Move from here to there," and it will move. Nothing will be impossible for you. - Jesus, to his disciples Wangari Maathai will be the first to tell you. It was faith that turned her little tree initiative into a national movement that mobilized more than 100,000 women to plant 30 million trees across Kenya; faith that gave her the courage to...
NEWS
October 15, 2006 | By Carolyn Davis
Men have done mighty things in Africa. All but one of that continent's elected leaders have been men; their actions have stirred and stopped progress from the top down. That all-male club was busted open last year after Liberians chose Ellen Johnson-Sirleaf, grandmother and international finance expert, as president. But Johnson-Sirleaf only brought to the surface a movement long in progress. It's not well known - and yet one of the most encouraging things on the continent. Perhaps it's culture (men do dominate national politics)
NEWS
July 12, 2006 | By Dwayne Campbell INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Destiny Day, party planner to New York's music glitterati, totes Chanel and Gucci bags and struts her stuff in three-inch Jimmy Choos. She's got money in the bank, a few well-connected players to have fun with, and a heart that finds true love when least expected. Day is the high-rolling sistah in Last Night a DJ Saved My Life by Lyah Beth LeFlore (Harlem Moon/Broadway Books, $12.95), one of this season's new crop of "chick lit" books where the divas are black and beautiful, the men - whether in "slightly sagging" $200 jeans or Armani suits - are 6-foot-2 and gorgeous, and their glamorous lives collide in glamorous places such as MObar in Manhattan and star-studded Hamptons soirees.
NEWS
November 20, 2005 | By Shashank Bengali INQUIRER FOREIGN STAFF
On a continent where women suffer in nearly every measure of health and welfare, Ellen Johnson-Sirleaf's apparent election to the presidency of war-torn Liberia is raising hopes for a new era in African politics: the era of women. "It's a breakthrough for African women," said Florence Butegwa, West Africa director for the United Nations Development Fund for Women. "We haven't had a role model in terms of political leadership at that highest level. " Johnson-Sirleaf would be Africa's first elected female president.
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