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NEWS
November 6, 1994 | By Glenn Burkins, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Zulu, English, Xhosa and Afrikaans - plus seven other African languages. None is better than another, according to South Africa's post-apartheid constitution, and all must be treated fairly. That might be politically correct, but it has turned the 800-foot transmitting station of the South African Broadcasting Corp. into a modern-day Tower of Babel. It is not uncommon, for instance, to watch a news show in which one anchor speaks Afrikaans and the other Zulu, while newsmakers are interviewed in their native languages without translation.
NEWS
March 17, 2011
Carel Boshoff, 83, the founder of South Africa's whites-only, separatist town Orania, died of cancer Wednesday. Dr. Boshoff founded the privately owned town of 900 people, in South Africa's northern province, in 1991 as South Africa transitioned from a white-ruled apartheid government to a democracy. Orania's goal was to preserve the culture of Afrikaners, one of South Africa's white minority groups. Its residents speak Afrikaans, sing traditional folk songs, attend the Dutch Reformed Church, and celebrate Afrikaans holidays.
NEWS
March 20, 1998 | By Andrew Maykuth, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
In the early 1960s, when Mlungiseleni Malgasi was a teenager, the South African government was erecting the racial walls of segregation, the system known as apartheid. Blacks such as Malgasi were relocated to neighborhoods of shacks, far from whites or their mixed-race neighbors, who were classified as "colored. " One day Malgasi's father took his family to the Old Apostolic Church, a colored congregation in this arid plateau known as the Great Karoo. He had the entire Malgasi clan rebaptized.
NEWS
May 6, 1990
We shall see how long it lasts, the search for common ground that - even in the historic photographs from Cape Town - was so nobly expressed by Nelson Mandela and South Africa's president, F.W. de Klerk. That the two leaders sat down at all last week, of course, was unprecedented, the white supremacist government having snubbed the leadership of the black majority for 78 years. There are those - both black and white - who do not wish the two men well. White conservatives stalked out of Parliament.
NEWS
July 22, 1986 | BY ADRIAN LEE
With its Afrikaans newspapers breathing defiance, the Botha Government turns an unblinking eye on the pre-election political posturings in the U.S. Congress. If the current Senate debate over tougher sanctions sounds pretty confused, with even the most vocal critics of the South African Government wondering privately how much good, if any, declaring economic war against South Africa will do, the South Africans don't act confused at all. As a matter of fact, Pretoria defines the terms of the Senate debate better than the senators themselves do. It asks, if Congress votes to sock it to the Botha Government, as it seems of a mind to do, what then?
LIVING
July 30, 1996 | By Andrew Maykuth, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
I've seen enough field hockey in the last week to last a lifetime. I didn't even know men played field hockey until South Africa Broadcasting Corp. began its coverage of the Atlanta Games. But South Africa has one of the 12 men's teams contending for Olympic gold, and suddenly the players of an obscure sport have become national television stars. It's one of the charming aspects of SABC's Olympic coverage that sets it apart from American broadcasts. South Africans get to see the Olympics in their raw, unedited form.
NEWS
August 31, 1990 | By Rick Lyman, Inquirer Staff Writer
Robert van Tonder stands on the sloping lawn of his ranch house, staring across the rolling emptiness of the high veld. "Politics is not a game for pansies," he says. "It's a struggle for power. " The founder and leader of the fledgling Boerestaat Party, van Tonder is the reigning thinker of South Africa's right wing, the author of 10 books, including political tracts and volumes of Afrikaans poetry. His most famous, a 90-page pamphlet called Boerestaat, caused a furor with its publication in 1977 arguing for a reinstatement of the old, Afrikaner republics as a solution to South Africa's troubles.
NEWS
December 4, 2012 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
Dorothy Miller-Clemmons, 55, who worked in early-childhood education in the Philadelphia School District for 19 years, died Monday, Nov. 26, in Penn Hospice at Rittenhouse of a bone ailment. Born in Jeppe Township, Johannesburg, South Africa, Mrs. Miller-Clemmons was raised in Bosmont after her family was forcibly removed from Jeppe because of apartheid. She earned her bachelor's degree in Afrikaans and Nederlands languages from the University of the Witwatersrand, Johannesburg, in 1981, after attending the University of the Western Cape for a year.
NEWS
October 18, 1990 | By William B. Collins, Inquirer Theater Critic
The formidable knot of existentialist drama that Athol Fugard wrote in Boesman and Lena remains stubbornly tied in the Philadelphia Drama Guild production at the Annenberg Center. This is the first play to be staged by Mary B. Robinson as artistic director of the producing organization. The play resists her weak efforts to make it into the vibrant document for our time that it should be. In the dead air of the Zellerbach Theater, Fugard's homeless couple are stranded without rescue.
NEWS
May 9, 2001 | By Clifford A. Ridley INQUIRER THEATER CRITIC
The South African living room onstage at the McCarter Theatre is described in the program as comfortable, but it scarcely looks that way: Its furnishings consist entirely of a long table, some accompanying wooden chairs, and a single small armchair with a side table and lamp. Comfortable is a relative term, to be sure, but the only people likely to apply it to this abode would be monks. Yet if Susan Hilferty's ascetic set is something of a misrepresentation, so is the enterprise it serves.
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NEWS
December 4, 2012 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
Dorothy Miller-Clemmons, 55, who worked in early-childhood education in the Philadelphia School District for 19 years, died Monday, Nov. 26, in Penn Hospice at Rittenhouse of a bone ailment. Born in Jeppe Township, Johannesburg, South Africa, Mrs. Miller-Clemmons was raised in Bosmont after her family was forcibly removed from Jeppe because of apartheid. She earned her bachelor's degree in Afrikaans and Nederlands languages from the University of the Witwatersrand, Johannesburg, in 1981, after attending the University of the Western Cape for a year.
NEWS
March 17, 2011
Carel Boshoff, 83, the founder of South Africa's whites-only, separatist town Orania, died of cancer Wednesday. Dr. Boshoff founded the privately owned town of 900 people, in South Africa's northern province, in 1991 as South Africa transitioned from a white-ruled apartheid government to a democracy. Orania's goal was to preserve the culture of Afrikaners, one of South Africa's white minority groups. Its residents speak Afrikaans, sing traditional folk songs, attend the Dutch Reformed Church, and celebrate Afrikaans holidays.
NEWS
May 9, 2001 | By Clifford A. Ridley INQUIRER THEATER CRITIC
The South African living room onstage at the McCarter Theatre is described in the program as comfortable, but it scarcely looks that way: Its furnishings consist entirely of a long table, some accompanying wooden chairs, and a single small armchair with a side table and lamp. Comfortable is a relative term, to be sure, but the only people likely to apply it to this abode would be monks. Yet if Susan Hilferty's ascetic set is something of a misrepresentation, so is the enterprise it serves.
NEWS
December 3, 2000 | By Deborah Bolling, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Joy Morifi Hepkins remembers being 5 years old and pressing her small, brown face against a picture of a white girl, so that officials could "grade" her. "They measured the length of my nose against her nose. They measured my cheekbones, my forehead, the color of my skin. And I was classified as a colored," Morifi Hepkins said, recalling the day she got her South African birth certificate. "Then they wet my hair and made me wrap it around my ear," she said. "And when it stayed in place and didn't spring out or come undone, I was classified a higher grade of colored.
NEWS
March 20, 1998 | By Andrew Maykuth, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
In the early 1960s, when Mlungiseleni Malgasi was a teenager, the South African government was erecting the racial walls of segregation, the system known as apartheid. Blacks such as Malgasi were relocated to neighborhoods of shacks, far from whites or their mixed-race neighbors, who were classified as "colored. " One day Malgasi's father took his family to the Old Apostolic Church, a colored congregation in this arid plateau known as the Great Karoo. He had the entire Malgasi clan rebaptized.
LIVING
July 30, 1996 | By Andrew Maykuth, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
I've seen enough field hockey in the last week to last a lifetime. I didn't even know men played field hockey until South Africa Broadcasting Corp. began its coverage of the Atlanta Games. But South Africa has one of the 12 men's teams contending for Olympic gold, and suddenly the players of an obscure sport have become national television stars. It's one of the charming aspects of SABC's Olympic coverage that sets it apart from American broadcasts. South Africans get to see the Olympics in their raw, unedited form.
NEWS
May 13, 1996 | By Claude Lewis
In the end, words made the whole thing happen. On the day he was sentenced to life in prison in 1962, Nelson Mandela addressed the court in his native South Africa: "I do not believe that this court, in inflicting penalties on me for the crimes for which I am convicted, should be moved by the belief that penalties deter men from the course that they believe is right. History shows that penalties do not deter men when their conscience is aroused, nor will they deter my people or the colleagues with whom I have worked.
NEWS
May 8, 1996 | By Andrew Maykuth, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The posters are up. The bunting is draped. The stage is set for legislators to approve a new constitution for post-apartheid South Africa today. After two years of negotiations, legislators worked frantically last night, ironing out disagreements that had threatened to deadlock today's historic parliamentary vote. With only hours left before the deadline for adoption, the rival parties announced they were in accord. The proposed constitution endorsed by President Nelson Mandela's African National Congress enshrines the rights to adequate housing, food, water, education and health care - all of which were denied to the majority of black South Africans under white-minority rule that ended two years ago. Debates with minority parties over the contentious issues of property rights and language rights had been argued until the last minute, lending an element of drama to the occasion.
NEWS
November 6, 1994 | By Glenn Burkins, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Zulu, English, Xhosa and Afrikaans - plus seven other African languages. None is better than another, according to South Africa's post-apartheid constitution, and all must be treated fairly. That might be politically correct, but it has turned the 800-foot transmitting station of the South African Broadcasting Corp. into a modern-day Tower of Babel. It is not uncommon, for instance, to watch a news show in which one anchor speaks Afrikaans and the other Zulu, while newsmakers are interviewed in their native languages without translation.
NEWS
April 28, 1994 | By Rick Lyman, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Annette Kimble shifted from one foot to the other, staring down the long line of people in front of her: a white family of four, two black maids, a young white couple, four black workmen, and on and on up to the door of the polling station. "Who would have ever thought we'd see such a scene in Carletonville?" the 41-year-old white bookkeeper said. "The old days just don't exist anymore. " This is the heart of the white Afrikaner world, a mining and farming town on the gently rolling high veld of the western Transvaal with a history of conservative politics and hard race relations.
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