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NEWS
March 4, 2015 | BY VALERIE RUSS, Daily News Staff Writer russv@phillynews.com, 215-854-5987
TOMORROW COULD have been another historic first for Philadelphia - a day to showcase why we're the City of Brotherly Love. U.N. Ambassador Jang Il Hun and Counselor Kwon Jong Gun were among members of the North Korean mission to the United Nations set to sample our hospitality with visits to the Liberty Bell, the Reading Terminal Market and the Philadelphia Art Museum, according to Kerri Kennedy of the American Friends Service Committee. It would have been historic: The North Korean U.N. representatives normally never leave New York because the United States has no diplomatic relations with the Democratic People's Republic of Korea.
NEWS
December 29, 1987 | By JIM NICHOLSON, Daily News Staff Writer
Ruth Dross, who worked in the United States, Europe and Asia as an administrator for the American Friends Service Committee, died Friday. She was 82 and lived in the Germantown section of Philadelphia. Dross held key positions with the AFSC in post-World War II Germany, Vienna, Austria, Hong Kong and the United States. She spoke fluent German, French and Italian. She retired in 1975 after serving 10 years as director of volunteer services at Episcopal Community Services here. Her last position was as clerk of the board of managers at Stapeley Hall in Philadelphia, during the time it was expanded to include apartments and a nursing section for the Quaker retirement community.
LIVING
July 22, 1997 | By Maida Odom, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Kay Edstein heard the pride and the slight edge in her tour guide's response when he was asked where he got his education. His fluency in English (he even made jokes) led the delegation of U.S. educators visiting North Korea to presume that their guide had studied in the West. But he made it clear to them that he had been educated at home. That was a year ago, and Edstein, director of the Friends Council on Education, remembered that guide last week as the American Friends Service Committee (AFSC)
NEWS
July 5, 2007 | By Sally A. Downey INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Lawrence M. Miller Jr., 87, of New Britain, a Quaker activist, died of a stroke June 19 at home. For almost 50 years, Mr. Miller was active with the American Friends Service Committee in Philadelphia. He coordinated projects in Asia and the Middle East, represented Quakers at international conferences in China, Kenya, Romania, and the Soviet Union, spoke out for human rights, supported efforts to end world poverty, and participated in antiwar and civil-rights marches with the Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. and Archbishop Desmond Tutu.
NEWS
October 7, 2012 | By Sally A. Downey, Inquirer Staff Writer
Louis W. Schneider, 97, of Glenmoore, who aided victims of war and poverty for more than four decades as an administrator with the American Friends Service Committee, died Thursday, Sept. 20, at his farm. Mr. Schneider grew up in Brooklyn, N.Y. He earned a bachelor's degree from Columbia University and graduated from Union Theological Seminary. Mr. Schneider, whose grandfather and four uncles were Protestant ministers, then became a minister at a nondenominational church in Riverside, N.Y., after graduating from the seminary.
LIVING
November 13, 1997 | By Maida Odom, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Beginning Saturday, and for the next 30 days, the American Friends Service Committee will be mailing Secretary of State Madeleine Albright postcards with the picture of a hospitalized Iraqi child. It is the organization's way of appealing to Albright's conscience as the nation once again grapples with whether to take military action against Baghdad. Sending the postcards, along with one emergency kit containing layettes, diapers and other supplies, seems a small gesture, but in the AFSC value system, acts of individual conscience are at the heart of work that can have a broad impact.
NEWS
November 15, 1997 | by Ron Goldwyn, Daily News Staff Writer
War may be hell, but peacemaking is no easier. Just ask the Quakers, who mark the 50th anniversary this fall of their Nobel Peace Prize for relief work in post-World War II Europe. "Many times I have seen our workers fail," peace veteran Stephen Cary told 100-plus students from 23 Quaker high schools yesterday at Friends Meetinghouse, 4th and Arch streets. "They could give out food and water and provide housing, but they couldn't reach the bitterness and hatred that destroys a society.
NEWS
October 11, 1994 | By Andy Wallace, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Barbara W. Moffett, 71, of Society Hill, director of community relations for the American Friends Service Committee and a steadfast worker for racial and economic justice, died Saturday at the home of a friend in Powelton Village. In 1963, Ms. Moffett had a hand in a major event in the struggle for civil rights when she agreed to print and help distribute the letter that the Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. wrote from the Birmingham, Ala., jail. In the letter, Dr. King outlined his ideas on nonviolent action.
NEWS
November 6, 1997 | By Linda Wright Moore
Fifty years ago, on Dec. 10, 1947, the leader of a Philadelphia-based religious service organization traveled to Norway to accept one of the world's greatest honors: the Nobel Peace Prize. The prize was awarded to all members of the Quaker faith, only about 200,000 people worldwide then - and today. Henry J. Cadbury, a founder and chairman of the American Friends Service Committee, went to Europe to receive the Peace Prize. Pictured here in the formal attire he wore on the occasion, Cadbury appears a bit stiff and uncomfortable.
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NEWS
March 5, 2015 | BY VALERIE RUSS, Daily News Staff Writer russv@phillynews.com, 215-854-5987
TODAY COULD have been another historic first for Philadelphia - a day to showcase why we're the City of Brotherly Love. U.N. Ambassador Jang Il Hun and Counselor Kwon Jong Gun were among members of the North Korean mission to the United Nations set to sample our hospitality, with visits to the Liberty Bell, Reading Terminal Market and Philadelphia Museum of Art, according to Kerri Kennedy, of the American Friends Service Committee. It would have been historic: The North Korean U.N. representatives normally never leave New York because the United States has no diplomatic relations with North Korea.
NEWS
December 27, 2014 | By Jason Laughlin, Inquirer Staff Writer
Warren A. Witte, 74, of Newtown, who worked throughout the country to offer aid and social assistance through Quaker organizations, died Wednesday, Dec. 17, at Temple University Hospital of an acute respiratory infection. Born in Wauwatosa, Wis., Mr. Witte spent much of his life in social service through the American Friends Service Committee and Friends Services for the Aging. After retiring in 2006, he remained involved in service through a committee he established to assist Bosnians and the Friends Board Training and Support Project, Chandler Hall and George School.
NEWS
March 13, 2014 | By Vernon Clark, Inquirer Staff Writer
PHILADELPHIA It has been used with great effect to challenge those in power and bring about social change, to further the civil rights movement, to end apartheid in South Africa, and to advance the cause of the United Farm Workers in California's San Joaquin Valley. An exhibit opening Wednesday at the offices of the American Friends Service Committee (AFSC) titled "Boycott! The Art of Economic Activism" illustrates the power of boycotts in bringing about change around the world over the last 50 years.
NEWS
April 24, 2013 | By Kristin E. Holmes, Inquirer Staff Writer
When the jailed leader of the civil rights era scribbled the first words of what would become a literary touchstone for writings on oppression and protest, Drexel Hill's Jonathan Rieder was forging a suburban kid's path to activism. The student member of the NAACP ditched science class at Friends' Central School in Wynnewood to attend a demonstration. He rose to his feet at Quaker meeting to talk about the turmoil in the South. Decades later, Rieder wrote a book about the Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. and his famed "Letter From Birmingham Jail," revealing an indignant and angry leader impatient for change.
NEWS
October 7, 2012 | By Sally A. Downey, Inquirer Staff Writer
Louis W. Schneider, 97, of Glenmoore, who aided victims of war and poverty for more than four decades as an administrator with the American Friends Service Committee, died Thursday, Sept. 20, at his farm. Mr. Schneider grew up in Brooklyn, N.Y. He earned a bachelor's degree from Columbia University and graduated from Union Theological Seminary. Mr. Schneider, whose grandfather and four uncles were Protestant ministers, then became a minister at a nondenominational church in Riverside, N.Y., after graduating from the seminary.
NEWS
March 25, 2012 | They Say: A History of the Nobel Peace Prize Jay Nordlinger?is a senior editor of National Review and the author of the just-released "Peace
Jay Nordlinger?is a senior editor of National Review and the author of the just-released "Peace, They Say: A History of the Nobel Peace Prize, the Most Famous and Controversial Prize in the World" (Encounter Books) The story of the Nobel Peace Prize is a long one, beginning in 1901. It is also an interesting one, boasting a huge, diverse cast of characters. In 1947, it becomes a bit of a Philadelphia story. The prize was shared that year by two Quaker relief organizations: the Friends Service Council in London and the American Friends Service Committee in Philadelphia.
NEWS
November 3, 2007 | By Martha Woodall INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
While she was the interim head of the Oprah Winfrey Leadership Academy for Girls in South Africa, Joan Countryman was struck by the talent, spark, and the thirst for knowledge of the seventh and eighth graders chosen to attend the free, private boarding school. "These kids have 'it,' " explained Countryman, a former math teacher and administrator at Germantown Friends School who spent eight months helping launch Winfrey's $40 million school near Johannesburg. "They are lively and interested in their education.
NEWS
October 8, 2007 | By Craig R. McCoy INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Dr. Leo Eloesser planned his legacy down to the last exacting detail. "I direct that my corpse be buried as cheaply as possible in whatever town or place I may happen to die," he wrote in his will on Feb. 14, 1975. A celebrity doctor of his day, a friend of left-wing artists like Pablo Casals and Frida Kahlo, Eloesser insisted on the simplest of send-offs: His casket should be a "plain wooden box. " His grave marker should cost $5 or less. The only extravagance: $500 for "a decent string quartet" to play a Mozart quartet in C major.
NEWS
July 5, 2007 | By Sally A. Downey INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Lawrence M. Miller Jr., 87, of New Britain, a Quaker activist, died of a stroke June 19 at home. For almost 50 years, Mr. Miller was active with the American Friends Service Committee in Philadelphia. He coordinated projects in Asia and the Middle East, represented Quakers at international conferences in China, Kenya, Romania, and the Soviet Union, spoke out for human rights, supported efforts to end world poverty, and participated in antiwar and civil-rights marches with the Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. and Archbishop Desmond Tutu.
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