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Afterlife

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ENTERTAINMENT
September 9, 2010
At first, I thought Milla Jovovich was moving toward us. The cars on the street below are really the only clue that she isn't. And the juxtaposition of Jovo-vich firing both guns as she falls away - as the shells from the discharged bullets and the shards of broken glass pop forward, at us - gives this straightforward, two-dimensional poster a sly/cool, 3-D feel. "Resident Evil: Afterlife" is the fourth time Alice has gone up against Umbrella, and the blood-spattering conflict between this hot chick and the evil corporation (in a high-tech world where a virus has created a population of zombies)
NEWS
February 22, 2010 | By Howard Shapiro INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
In the afterlife, there is no footwear. I found this to be a major disappointment when I saw that no one wore real foot protection in any of the three short pieces that compose the highly conceptual new work Mort. And here I was, looking forward - if one can, to such times - to an infinity of sublime Hush Puppies. I'll get over it. But Mort has shoeless Zombies in Hell - will they ever get over being plagued forever by highly off-Broadway choreography and the all-too-late and all-too-unsurprising revelation that they are no longer the lovable toddlers they were many years ago?
ENTERTAINMENT
December 22, 1989 | By Desmond Ryan, Inquirer Movie Critic
The difference between Always and E.T. The Extra Terrestrial and Close Encounters of the Third Kind - Steven Spielberg's previous discussions of things not of this world - is fundamental. It is the difference between hoping somebody out there likes you and believing somebody up there likes you. And what a big difference it is. Both Close Encounters and E.T. couched strongly religious themes of redemption in the secular conventions of science fiction, and both films are towering achievements in the genre.
NEWS
April 8, 2010 | By GARY THOMPSON, thompsg@phillynews.com 215-854-5992
Christina Ricci dons a negligee to play a crash victim caught between two worlds in "After. Life," a title that squanders an opportunity. An opportunity to call the movie "The Half Naked and the Half Dead," an apt description of the way "After.Life" functions as a psychosexual horror movie and M. Night Shyamalanish spiritual thriller. Ricci is Anna Taylor, a high-strung girl who mistakes her boyfriend's clumsy marriage proposal for a breakup speech, then drives off in a tearful rage, right into the back of a truck.
LIVING
May 2, 1999 | By Naomi Geschwind, FOR THE INQUIRER
It was a year to the day after the death of his best friend in a car accident in 1973 that Simcha Paull Raphael gave his first class on Jewish views of the afterlife. Over the years, the subject has become his life's mission - and most students still have the same first reaction: "I thought Judaism didn't believe in an afterlife. " Those are the very words Gloria Goldberg of West Chester uses to explain why she and her husband, Martin, signed up for Raphael's class on the subject.
NEWS
September 11, 2010 | By Tirdad Derakhshani, Inquirer Staff Writer
It's hard not to fall in love with Alice, the stunning heroine played by Ukrainian-born supermodel-turned-actress Milla Jovovich in the video-game-spawned Resident Evil zombie action film franchise. Sadly, it's impossible to feel the same for the fourth entry in the series, Resident Evil: Afterlife , despite its billion-dollar look and its phantasmagoric 3D effects. Alice was beguiling in the 2002 opening flick, which had the winsome beauty karate-kick, shoot, stab, hack, and axe her way through hordes of drooling, human-flesh-eating zombies - all while dressed in a white cocktail number barely the size of a dinner napkin.
NEWS
January 14, 2010 | By GARY THOMPSON, thompsg@phillynews.com 215-854-5992
The afterlife, it turns out, is cool, but not as cool as "Avatar. " So we see in "The Lovely Bones," an effects-laden ghost story from Lord of the Ringsmaster Peter Jackson, who trains his talent for CGI on Alice Sebold's best-selling story of a murdered girl who haunts her old neighborhood (filmed just outside Philadelphia) and her killer. Much of "Bones" takes place in the young girl's limbo, brought to afterlife by Jackson and his Oscar-winning army of New Zealand effects artists as a surreal projection of a teen girl's fears and fantasies.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 10, 1990 | By Gary Thompson, Daily News Move Critic
The premise of "Flatliners" is this: Philosophy failed. Religion failed. The mystery of what lies beyond death can be solved only by science. To that end, young medical students intentionally kill and resuscitate each other, thereby gaining knowledge of the afterlife, which turns out to look a lot like . . . MTV. I don't know about you, but I was kind of hoping there would be more to heaven than mood lighting and dry ice fog. To a...
NEWS
March 30, 1988 | By Carrie Rickey, Inquirer Movie Critic
Now, a good host introduces his guests. But in the spectral, hyperkinetic comedy Beetlejuice, director Tim Burton is not a good host, although he is incontestably an imaginative one. It's up to us to make the introductions: Topper, have you met Pee-wee's Playhouse ? Beetlejuice is a supernatural spoof set in a Connecticut country house whose L. L. Bean-clad owners die in a freak car crash but leave their genial spirits to haunt their beloved three-story. Trouble is, Adam and Barbara Maitland (Alec Baldwin and Geena Davis)
ENTERTAINMENT
August 10, 1990 | By Carrie Rickey, Inquirer Movie Critic
Some movies flirt with death; Flatliners goes all the way. This trivial movie engages a significant subject: What happens to you after death. In Flatliners, five med-school students experiment with death, clinically die and are revived, living to tell what happened. Yes, there is an afterlife, but why does it look like an atmospheric after- hours club? Kind of makes you wonder - where does God shop for fog machines and white-light lamps? Hey, are those celestial rays halogen bulbs?
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
September 28, 2015 | By Stacey Burling, Inquirer Staff Writer
Lisa Smartt, a poet and linguist, became fascinated by the beautiful, weird, cryptic words of the dying during her father's last days in 2012. "I can't reach, Jack," he said. "My modality is broken. " And, "There is so much so in sorrow. " And, the one that stunned her, because he was not a religious man: "Lisa, you were right about the angels!" She started the Final Words Project to collect other departing thoughts that people sent her. By nature, it was not scientific. These were anecdotes, words that relatives had taken the time to record and had deemed meaningful.
NEWS
July 25, 2013 | BY STEPHANIE FARR, Daily News Staff Writer farrs@phillynews.com, 215-854-4225
AS GAYLEN Marzolf could see his own life drawing to a close last spring at the age of 51, the man who never gave his wife, Lynette, a choice but to love him asked her to carry out one final choice for him. Gaylen, a "computer geek," wanted a QR (Quick Response) code affixed to his tombstone at Sunnyside Cemetery in Harvey, N.D., so friends and strangers with smartphones could scan the code and be taken to a digital memorial website for Gaylen. That way, those who visited his grave would not just learn his name and the dates that marked the beginning and end of his life, but they would also learn about how he lived his life in between.
NEWS
April 8, 2012 | By Kevin Stein
'Poetry is dead. Long live poetry!" That's my rejoinder to National Poetry Month's seasonal hue and cry - febrile lament of poetry's demise coupled with celebration of its monarchal reign as highest of arts. For poetry lovers this renders April "the cruelest month," as T.S. Eliot observed. Like most poets writing today, I grew up with the notion that poetry is knock, knock, knocking on heaven's door. My teachers, my peers, and many literary journals reminded me that I am merely bloodying my knuckles.
NEWS
July 27, 2011
By Seymour I. "Spence" Toll Born in 1874 in what is now part of Pittsburgh, Gertrude Stein was one of five children raised by middle-class Jewish parents in Oakland, Calif. She did not practice her faith after childhood, and her view of the afterlife was, "When a Jew dies, he's dead. " Physiologically speaking, she's been dead for 65 years as of today, but she remains a distinct and lively presence in our culture. This summer, for example, Stein (as played by Kathy Bates)
NEWS
June 17, 2011
SO letter-writer Karen Morrissey thinks there's a doggy heaven. I guess she also thinks there's a doggy hell. And I guess Cujo is burning for all eternity, while Lassie is spending the rest of her days in paradise. If what Morrissey thinks is correct, there must be a code of conduct for Scooby Doo and his cohorts, a Ten Commandments to abide by. For example: Thou shalt not lick thyself. Miss Morrissey, they were Michael Vick's dogs, and he can do what he wants with them. He shouldn't have served a day in jail, but thanks to our pathetic system, he did. Mike Franklin, Marlton, N.J.
NEWS
September 11, 2010 | By Tirdad Derakhshani, Inquirer Staff Writer
It's hard not to fall in love with Alice, the stunning heroine played by Ukrainian-born supermodel-turned-actress Milla Jovovich in the video-game-spawned Resident Evil zombie action film franchise. Sadly, it's impossible to feel the same for the fourth entry in the series, Resident Evil: Afterlife , despite its billion-dollar look and its phantasmagoric 3D effects. Alice was beguiling in the 2002 opening flick, which had the winsome beauty karate-kick, shoot, stab, hack, and axe her way through hordes of drooling, human-flesh-eating zombies - all while dressed in a white cocktail number barely the size of a dinner napkin.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 9, 2010
At first, I thought Milla Jovovich was moving toward us. The cars on the street below are really the only clue that she isn't. And the juxtaposition of Jovo-vich firing both guns as she falls away - as the shells from the discharged bullets and the shards of broken glass pop forward, at us - gives this straightforward, two-dimensional poster a sly/cool, 3-D feel. "Resident Evil: Afterlife" is the fourth time Alice has gone up against Umbrella, and the blood-spattering conflict between this hot chick and the evil corporation (in a high-tech world where a virus has created a population of zombies)
NEWS
April 8, 2010 | By GARY THOMPSON, thompsg@phillynews.com 215-854-5992
Christina Ricci dons a negligee to play a crash victim caught between two worlds in "After. Life," a title that squanders an opportunity. An opportunity to call the movie "The Half Naked and the Half Dead," an apt description of the way "After.Life" functions as a psychosexual horror movie and M. Night Shyamalanish spiritual thriller. Ricci is Anna Taylor, a high-strung girl who mistakes her boyfriend's clumsy marriage proposal for a breakup speech, then drives off in a tearful rage, right into the back of a truck.
NEWS
February 22, 2010 | By Howard Shapiro INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
In the afterlife, there is no footwear. I found this to be a major disappointment when I saw that no one wore real foot protection in any of the three short pieces that compose the highly conceptual new work Mort. And here I was, looking forward - if one can, to such times - to an infinity of sublime Hush Puppies. I'll get over it. But Mort has shoeless Zombies in Hell - will they ever get over being plagued forever by highly off-Broadway choreography and the all-too-late and all-too-unsurprising revelation that they are no longer the lovable toddlers they were many years ago?
NEWS
January 14, 2010 | By GARY THOMPSON, thompsg@phillynews.com 215-854-5992
The afterlife, it turns out, is cool, but not as cool as "Avatar. " So we see in "The Lovely Bones," an effects-laden ghost story from Lord of the Ringsmaster Peter Jackson, who trains his talent for CGI on Alice Sebold's best-selling story of a murdered girl who haunts her old neighborhood (filmed just outside Philadelphia) and her killer. Much of "Bones" takes place in the young girl's limbo, brought to afterlife by Jackson and his Oscar-winning army of New Zealand effects artists as a surreal projection of a teen girl's fears and fantasies.
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