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Aftermath

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SPORTS
October 6, 2008 | UP NEXT
UP NEXT Who: Eagles (2-3) at San Francisco (2-3) When: Sunday, 4:15 p.m. Where: Candlestick Park TV: Fox Radio: WYSP (94.1-FM), WIP (610-AM) Last meeting: Eagles won, 38-24, on Sept. 24, 2006. Series history: Niners lead, 17-9-1. Noteworthy: The 49ers have been using an alignment they call Big Sub, with four linemen, two linebackers and five defensive backs. EAGLES INJURY REPORT -- Brian Westbrook, rib contusion. Went into the locker room for X-rays, but returned to the game.
NEWS
April 26, 1987 | Associated Press
An injured worker is carried from the scene of a high-rise apartment building that collapsed Thursday while under construction in Bridgeport, Conn. At least a dozen workers were known dead, and rescuers were using ultra- sensitive microphones and trained dogs to search for survivors.
NEWS
October 25, 1995 | BY CHRISTOPHER BROWN
A short time before the Million Man March I read letter written to the Daily News which characterized Jill Porter as a racist. I read the paper and Ms. Porter regularly and decided that this was an observation no one could make for me and marched on to her next columns. On Oct. 18, as I walked through the paper, my journey was stopped by a brick wall called "March was glorious but Farrakhan isn't. " It was Jill Porter's latest. While she'll probably never admit to what really colors her opinion, her second sentence spoke volumns more than the entire column could ever do. She wrote, "In the aftermath of the Million Man March, a bigot is celebrated . . . " As I thought about how exhausted I was by the toll of the event on my body and the challenge to my mind, I wondered just what types of events have aftermaths.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 12, 2012 | By A.D. Amorosi, For The Inquirer
Richie Sambora has a lot on his mind. Beyond the brotherhood that is Bon Jovi, guitarist/vocalist Sambora has had to contend with personal demons throughout the last decade, often documented in the tabloid press. "I'm a big boy and knew full well what came with the territory," says Sambora. "It's the nature of celebrity, part of my vocation. I'm used to it - it was really intense when I was living with Cher - but I don't have to be happy about it. " It's those intimate ordeals and entanglements with their ensuing hassles and mediation and Sambora's struggles to find peace that are at the lyrical heart of Aftermath of the Lowdown , his first solo album in 14 years.
NEWS
April 6, 1989 | By Laura Fortunato, Special to The Inquirer
Mark Lord, 31, of the 600 block of Loraine Street, Ardmore, was arraigned March 29 on charges of homicide by vehicle in the aftermath of a Jan. 26 car accident that killed a Havertown man. According to police, Lord failed to yield the right of way and turned left onto Manoa Road from Pembroke Road, striking a truck driven by Robert L. Eck, 65, of the 300 block of Eagle Hill Road, Havertown. The accident occurred at 5:47 p.m. on Jan. 26. According to Sgt. Charles Brooks of Haverford Township Police, Eck got out of the car and started to walk to a house on Manoa Road to report the incident.
NEWS
August 26, 2002 | By Aparna Surendran INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A free public program on the effects of terrorism on public health and mental health will be presented at the College of Physicians of Philadelphia, 19 S. 22d St., at 5:30 p.m. Sept. 5. John Domzalski, Philadelphia public health commissioner, will moderate the event, which will feature Marci Layton, the assistant commissioner for communicable disease in the New York City Department of Health, and Elisabeth Young-Bruehl, a faculty member of Columbia University's Center for Psychoanalytic Training and Research.
NEWS
November 5, 1994 | By Terence Samuel, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A wooden stake stands where each body part was found. The tip of each stake is painted red. They spread by the hundreds across the scarred soybean field, pelted by the autumn rain yesterday. The thicket of stakes grows dense around the crater opened when the plane slammed down Monday, ending the lives of 68 people. Yesterday the field littered with the aftermath was opened to outsiders for the first time. Amid ordinary signs of the recent Indiana harvest comes the powerful realization that a sophisticated 45,000-pound aircraft and the bodies of 68 people splintered into pieces too tiny to recognize.
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NEWS
February 3, 2016 | BY STEVE M. BOHNEL bohnels@phillynews.com 215-854-5912 @Steve_Bohnel, Staff Writer
HEATHER DERONCK said biking near her South Philly store was slow, difficult, and dangerous in the aftermath of Winter Storm Jonas last week. Bike lanes were blocked by snow and ice, she said, putting bicyclists in the path of motorists. "People think it's their right to drive like an extra a- when there's snow," she added. DeRonck, owner of Bicycle Revolutions, on Fourth Street near Fitzwater, is one of many bicyclists who said there wasn't enough effort by the city to plow bike lanes after the snowfall, which meant bikers had to share the streets with hurried drivers - many of whom already were frustrated and unwilling to share the road with slower vehicles.
NEWS
October 6, 2015 | By Jacqueline L. Urgo, Inquirer Staff Writer
OCEAN CITY, N.J. - While officials in New Jersey barrier island towns began tallying erosion losses Monday after a weekend nor'easter of roiling surf and gusting winds that chewed away at the beachfront, comparisons were quick to be made to the last notorious storm - Sandy, in 2012. But Stewart Farrell, an expert in coastal geology and director and founder of Stockton University's Coastal Research Center, said this nor'easter's duration - and ultimate displacement of hundreds of thousands of tons of sand up and down the coast - were more like those of a 1962 storm that has long been a benchmark for Jersey Shore weather.
SPORTS
September 24, 2015 | By Rich Hofmann, Daily News Executive Sports Editor
IF PAST IS indeed prologue - I think Bronko Nagurski said that first - then there is indeed a lot at stake on Sunday when the Eagles play the Jets. The number has been quoted often in recent days, that an NFL team that starts 0-2 has a 12 percent chance of making the playoffs. That's based on this math: Since 1990, when the NFL expanded the playoffs to 12 teams, 24 teams that started 0-2 made the playoffs out of 199 teams that started 0-2. So, there's that. But this is the week where the numbers really get serious.
NEWS
August 26, 2014 | By Michaelle Bond and Ben Finley, Inquirer Staff Writers
Last month, Joshua Mensah shared a meal with some of his soon-to-be Cornell University classmates from the Philadelphia area. The annual freshman send-off, at a Drexel Hill country club, focused on his new school. But Mensah found himself defending his old school district in Chester County: A parent said she had heard bad things about Coatesville. Mensah knew all too well what she meant. A year ago, hundreds of pages of racist and sexist text messages between Coatesville's superintendent and athletic director came to light.
NEWS
July 16, 2014 | By Alfred Lubrano, Inquirer Staff Writer
In the aftermath of the fire that killed four children on Gesner Street on July 5, neighbors and relatives complained that Fire Department response was too slow, while indignant city officials castigated the father of one of the victims for his vocal attacks. As feelings hardened, there was literally a standoff with police on the sidewalk outside City Hall. But quietly, behind the scenes, a police chaplain sidestepped the acrimony. He reached out to a nonprofit to help the family, natives of Liberia, to defray funeral costs.
NEWS
April 4, 2014 | By Angela Couloumbis and Craig R. McCoy, Inquirer Staff Writers
HARRISBURG - Democratic and Republican leaders in the state House moved swiftly Wednesday to ban lawmakers in the chamber from accepting cash gifts from lobbyists and others with an interest in state government. The new ethics rule follows stories in The Inquirer that a now-shuttered sting investigation by the state Attorney General's Office had captured five Philadelphia Democrats, including four House members, on recordings accepting money or gifts. In imposing the ban, House leaders said its members, as well as its employees, cannot accept a gift unless it is from a spouse, relative, or friend.
NEWS
March 24, 2014 | By Barbara Boyer, Inquirer Staff Writer
One of the first officers to arrive at the rowdy bar on that awful night was Detective Joseph Delaney. What he saw would haunt him for the rest of his life. "I remember walking in and the tavern being very dark," Delaney recalled in 1988, 25 years after the cold-blooded killings of two officers shocked New Jersey and the country. "My foot slipped on what I thought was spilled beer or wine. "It was blood. The blood of men whom I'd known. " When Delaney entered, the smell of gunpowder lingered in the air. It was Aug. 26, 1963.
BUSINESS
October 17, 2013 | By Erin E. Arvedlund, Inquirer Columnist
If the U.S. government defaults on its debt, what will be the impact in the financial world, and what does it mean for the average citizen? The answer: There would be a lot of pain to go around. Perhaps most disturbing would be universal doubt about the creditworthiness of the United States. It would be an unprecedented shattering of the international image of the nation. Right behind that comes wave after wave of fiscal uncertainty. That doubt will roil the markets, but it goes beyond just bad times for investors.
NEWS
October 7, 2013 | By Darran Simon, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Facebook message from the stranger was cryptic: I've been searching for you. I'll understand if you don't want to talk to me. Perhaps it was an old friend, Rhonda Gibson figured as she read and reread it. She messaged back. Gibson was startled to read Latonya McGorder's reply. McGorder said she was the mother of one of 10 people involved in a savage gang beating that left Gibson's surrogate son, Michael Hawkins, bloodied and dead in Camden. McGorder said she was grieving not just for her only son, Lance Fulton, 23, sentenced to a 25-year prison term in the attack, but for the victim as well.
NEWS
May 18, 2013 | By Paul Nussbaum, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Delaware River Port Authority has finally concluded its long-running dispute with former corporate secretary John Lawless, two months after a preliminary settlement was reached. Lawless, a former Pennsylvania legislator, was escorted by DRPA police from his office at the agency's Camden headquarters on April 23, 2010, sparking a lengthy legal battle. Lawless sued, contending he was fired for taking two weeks off in December 2009 to seek treatment for alcoholism. The DRPA denied that and said that Lawless' position was a "political placement" and that he "was removed from that position for political reasons.
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