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Age Discrimination

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BUSINESS
April 23, 1989 | By Kenneth J. Cooper, Inquirer Washington Bureau
Bill Gormin, then 60, was supervising sales of Jack Daniel's whiskey in Florida in 1986 when the liquor distillery encouraged him to retire early. Included in his retirement papers was a request that he either sign away his rights to sue the company or accept "lesser benefits. " Gormin did sign, but now he's suing. The Tampa resident and 40 former employees of Brown-Forman Corp. of Louisville, Ky., have accused the company of forcing them out of jobs because of their age, in violation of federal law. All 41 plaintiffs signed the no-lawsuit pledge and retired.
BUSINESS
September 9, 1988 | By Richard Burke, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Philadelphia office of the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission yesterday accused Oscar Mayer Foods Corp. of having a policy of discriminating against older employees by denying them certain benefits after plants are closed. The suit alleges that the food-products company, of Madison, Wis., has continued to violate the federal Age Discrimination in Employment Act despite attempts by the EEOC to get Oscar Mayer to comply voluntarily with the statute. The EEOC suit, filed in U.S. District Court in Philadelphia, resulted from its investigation of complaints filed by 15 former Oscar Mayer employees who lost their jobs in 1986 when the company cut back operations at its distribution center on South Front Street in Philadelphia.
NEWS
February 27, 1992 | By Rob Wingate, Larry King and Stephanie Banchero, SPECIAL TO THE INQUIRER
No golden parachute awaited Charles S. Johnson at the end of his ride as president of Sentinel Sprinkler Corp. According to an age-discrimination lawsuit Johnson filed against the Conshohocken firm Feb. 13 in Montgomery County Court, it was more like a lead balloon. Johnson, of Gwynedd Valley, was fired in May after almost nine years as president of the water-sprinkler systems company. He was 64 at the time. Johnson's age, the lawsuit says, "was the sole basis for (the company's)
NEWS
April 30, 2016
By David Neumark An aging population, coupled with low employment rates among Americans older than 62, poses severe challenges to the long-term sustainability of Social Security. Numerous reforms have been proposed to extend their working lives, including raising the retirement age. Such reforms may be unlikely to gain traction - not because people are so eager to retire, but because age discrimination sharply limits job opportunities. After decades of debate, most labor economists today accept that discrimination has played a role in limiting job opportunities for minorities and women.
NEWS
December 16, 2015 | By Martha Woodall, STAFF WRITER
A former top administrator and principal at String Theory Schools has filed a federal suit alleging the charter operator discriminated against her and wrongfully terminated her because of her age. Gail H. Avicolli contends that shortly after the School Reform Commission renewed the five-year operating agreement for the Philadelphia Performing Arts Charter School in January, 2014, founder Angela Corosanite and son Jason, the chief operating officer,...
BUSINESS
November 25, 1986 | By Richard Burke, Inquirer Staff Writer
The American Association of Retired Persons yesterday filed a class-action suit against Du Pont Co., charging the Wilmington chemical manufacturer with age discrimination in a voluntary early-retirement program offered to employees last year. The suit, filed in U.S. District Court in Philadelphia, charges that workers who were over age 65 and/or had more than 35 years of service at Du Pont could not take full advantage of incentives offered to other workers. Under Du Pont's program, employees who elected to retire early could increase their pension benefits by adding five years to their age at retirement plus five years of service to the number of years they worked for Du Pont.
SPORTS
May 21, 2011 | By DAVID MURPHY, dmurphy@phillynews.com
Former longtime Phillies scout Hank King has filed a federal age-discrimination lawsuit against the organization, alleging that it created an "intolerable" working environment and that the team ultimately fired him because of his age and a liver virus that caused him to take a medical leave in September 2009. King, 66, worked for the Phillies from 1976 through the 2009 season, starting out as a batting-practice pitcher before joining the scouting department in 1983. King was part of an advance scouting team that shadowed the Tampa Bay Rays before the Phillies' World Series victory in 2008.
NEWS
December 4, 1987 | By Joseph A. Slobodzian, Inquirer Staff Writer
Albert Herchick began working for the federal government in 1972 at age 60, starting a new career with the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission in Philadelphia that lasted until a heart attack in April 1985 forced him to retire. He earned $45,011 a year as an EEOC supervisor. When Herchick filed for disability retirement benefits in February 1986, he was surprised to learn that the benefits would total only $9,756 per year, an amount that he would have received had he retired voluntarily in good health.
NEWS
September 8, 2005 | By Dan Hardy INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A former Coatesville Area School District special education supervisor who retired after her job was eliminated in June 2004 has sued the district, saying she was the victim of age discrimination. Nancy Wozniak, 63, of West Brandywine Township, filed the lawsuit in late August in U.S. District Court in Philadelphia. Judge Berle M. Schiller is scheduled to hear the case; no date has been set. The suit asks for back pay, reinstatement or additional compensation and an end to age discrimination by the district.
NEWS
March 4, 2009 | By Jan Hefler INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
More than 120 New Jersey State Police troopers filed a lawsuit yesterday seeking to have the agency's mandatory retirement policy overturned. The troopers, saying they are fit and want to stay in law enforcement, contend the requirement that they retire by age 55 is discriminatory and outdated. The lawsuit, filed in state Superior Court in Trenton and seeking class-action status, mirrors legal challenges mounted in other states. Troopers in New York, Massachusetts, and Kentucky have won similar age-bias lawsuits, receiving millions in back pay and health benefits.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
June 10, 2016 | By Valerie Russ, Staff Writer
SANDRA HOLMAN BACOTE worked for 29 years fighting discrimination in Pennsylvania. And she also danced with South African Nobel Peace Prize-winner Archbishop Desmond Tutu, a family member said. "She was at some event where she danced with Desmond Tutu," recalled niece Diane Davis, who described a photo of the two. "This was the aunt everybody wanted," Davis said. Mrs. Bacote, 75, who grew up in North Philadelphia and became regional director of the Pennsylvania Human Relations Commission, died Saturday, June 4, after an illness.
NEWS
April 30, 2016
By David Neumark An aging population, coupled with low employment rates among Americans older than 62, poses severe challenges to the long-term sustainability of Social Security. Numerous reforms have been proposed to extend their working lives, including raising the retirement age. Such reforms may be unlikely to gain traction - not because people are so eager to retire, but because age discrimination sharply limits job opportunities. After decades of debate, most labor economists today accept that discrimination has played a role in limiting job opportunities for minorities and women.
BUSINESS
January 17, 2016
In 2008 and 2010, Vanguard settled two lawsuits brought by the U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission over the firm's alleged racial discrimination against African American employees*. The claims were settled for $500,000 and $300,000. Here is a breakdown of some other suits and an EEOC complaint filed against the company since then:                                   Year                                               Plaintiff(s)
NEWS
December 16, 2015 | By Martha Woodall, STAFF WRITER
A former top administrator and principal at String Theory Schools has filed a federal suit alleging the charter operator discriminated against her and wrongfully terminated her because of her age. Gail H. Avicolli contends that shortly after the School Reform Commission renewed the five-year operating agreement for the Philadelphia Performing Arts Charter School in January, 2014, founder Angela Corosanite and son Jason, the chief operating officer,...
NEWS
June 25, 2014 | By Marie McCullough, Inquirer Staff Writer
As expected, the organizations that set national organ allocation policy on Monday permanently adopted the temporary rule change that enabled then-10-year-old Sarah Murnaghan of Newtown Square to receive adult lungs a year ago. In a statement, the board of directors of the Organ Procurement and Transplantation Network/United Network for Organ Sharing said the change would expand access only "for a very limited group of young lung transplant candidates....
NEWS
June 24, 2013 | By Mark Fazlollah, Inquirer Staff Writer
Sarah Murnaghan, the 10-year-old Delaware County girl who underwent a double-lung transplant after a national debate over the waiting-list process, has awakened from a medically induced coma and is communicating by nodding, her family said Saturday. Sarah's aunt, Sharon Ruddock, said the girl stays awake for brief periods and responds to questions by nodding to indicate yes or no. "She's still intubated and awake off and on," Ruddock said. "She's doing well, and we're excited.
NEWS
June 24, 2013 | By Emilie Lounsberry, For The Inquirer
  Arthur R. Tilson thoroughly enjoys being a Montgomery County judge. He likes figuring out a tough legal question, helping negotiate a settlement, dealing with lawyers. It's satisfying work, he said, a bit like solving a complicated crossword puzzle. But Tilson, a Common Pleas Court judge since 2001, will be out of a job at the end of the year simply because he is now 70, the mandatory retirement age for state court judges in Pennsylvania. And that, he believes, is unfair.
NEWS
June 19, 2013 | By Peter Jackson, Associated Press
HARRISBURG - Pennsylvania's highest court on Monday unanimously rejected a challenge to a constitutional provision that requires judges to retire by the end of the year in which they turn 70. The state Supreme Court ruled on two lawsuits filed by judges who argued that the mandatory-retirement provision, part of a 1968 amendment, conflicted with an older section of the constitution that bars age discrimination. Writing for the majority, Justice Thomas Saylor said, "Theoretically at least there is some possibility that a constitutional amendment might impinge on inherent, inalienable rights otherwise recognized in the constitution itself.
NEWS
June 12, 2013 | By Marie McCullough, Inquirer Staff Writer
After weeks of pleas from the family of 10-year-old Sarah Murnaghan of Newtown Square, the organization that sets national organ-transplant policy voted late Monday to temporarily improve children's access to adolescent and adult donor lungs, despite criticizing a federal judge for doing the same thing for her. The executive committee of the Organ Procurement and Transplantation Network met to consider whether children under 12 were being treated...
NEWS
April 25, 2013
Learning outside the classroom Despite a continual emphasis on test preparation, many Philadelphia schools nurture students' "grit, zest, self-control, curiosity, and resilience" ("Reading and writing and GRIT," April 10). Moreover, skilled teachers can turn everyday disappointments into opportunities to cultivate perseverance and optimism. That said, expectations of teachers are expanding while critical resources diminish. Given the current school-day constraints, Inquirer readers should keep in mind that after-school, summer, youth development, and out-of-school programs are purposefully designed to exercise students' curiosity, resilience, inquiry, and patience.
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