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Agreement

NEWS
June 21, 2014 | By Jennifer Lin, Inquirer Staff Writer
A labor agreement to lower union costs on new construction won unanimous approval Thursday from the Philadelphia Housing Authority's board of commissioners. Herb Wetzel, a PHA commissioner and executive director for housing and community development issues for City Council, said he "never thought he'd see the day that we'd get an affordable housing agreement in Philadelphia. " Under the pact, the building trades would lower costs by 20 percent on large-scale construction projects for the housing authority.
BUSINESS
January 28, 2016
In the Region DuPont posts loss, plans cuts DuPont Co. , which is pursuing a merger with Dow Chemical , showed a fourth-quarter loss and announced 6,000 layoffs as it ramped up cost-cutting ahead of the proposed deal. An earlier announcement on those job cuts indicated that 1,700 of them were to be in Delaware. The Wilmington chemical company Tuesday reported a loss of $253 million, or 29 cents per share, for the quarter ending Dec. 31, compared with a profit of $683 million, or 75 cents per share, for the same period in 2014.
BUSINESS
December 12, 2012 | Associated Press
HONG KONG - HSBC says it's paying $1.9 billion in penalties to settle a U.S. money laundering probe. The investigation into HSBC has focused on the transfer of billions of dollars on behalf of nations such as Iran and the transfer of money from Mexican drug cartels. The British bank said in statement Tuesday that the settlement involves a deferred prosecution agreement with the U.S. Department of Justice. The bank won't be prosecuted if it meets certain conditions, such as strengthening internal controls to prevent money laundering.
NEWS
April 27, 2006
Re Cletus McBride's letter "A body query": Mr. McBride should've noticed at the Body Worlds exhibit the many signs explaining that the bodies on display were those of people who signed agreements before their deaths, allowing their remains to be put on display for the exhibit. So, to answer your question of why all the models were Caucasian, I assume that it's because only Caucasians signed the agreement. Thomas C. Clemens Philadelphia
SPORTS
March 28, 2013 | By Keith Pompey, Inquirer Staff Writer
The soon-to-be-renamed Big East Conference announced Tuesday that it has an agreement with longtime partner CBS Sports to televise men's basketball games through the 2019-20 season. Financial terms of the agreement were not announced. "We are delighted to be extending the historic and successful relationship that we have enjoyed with CBS Sports since 1983," Big East president Mike Aresco said in a statement. "This agreement further illustrates the excitement and anticipation that surround the reinvention of our conference, and it will provide our fans across the country the opportunity to watch our games on network television.
NEWS
April 16, 2013 | By Kevin Mcgill, Associated Press
NEW ORLEANS - A political brawl has broken out between the mayor and a sheriff who runs the city jail, which has come under scrutiny for a video showing inmates using drugs, drinking beer, and handling a gun. Mayor Mitch Landrieu asked a judge last week to take the extraordinary step of placing the jail under federal oversight, effectively wresting control away from Orleans Parish Sheriff Marlin Gusman. Landrieu is upset over an agreement Gusman reached with the U.S. Justice Department to reform the jail, saying the city, which funds the jail, can't afford the potential expense.
NEWS
December 13, 2013 | BY SEAN COLLINS WALSH, Daily News Staff Writer walshSE@phillynews.com, 215-854-4172
AFTER threatening a strike, the leader of Philly's prison-healthcare-workers union has reached a tentative agreement with the company that manages treatment for the city's roughly 9,000 inmates, sources with knowledge of the negotiations said. Henry Nicholas, president of the National Union of Hospital & Health Care Employees District 1199C, is expected to present to his 270 prison workers a compromise that will include wage increases and less-generous health-care plans. If approved, the agreement would avert a strike threatened in an op-ed by Nicholas in yesterday's Inquirer . Nicholas and representatives of Corizon, a Tennessee company that the city pays $42 million per year to manage the city's prison health care, spent hours yesterday in the offices of Everett Gillison, Mayor Nutter's chief of staff.
BUSINESS
January 22, 2016 | By Joseph N. DiStefano, STAFF WRITER
CVS will award customers with $3.50 worth of store credit coupons if they find expired products at the chain's Pennsylvania stores, part of a settlement with the state Attorney General's office. The settlement follows repeat cases in which state investigators found expired drugs, baby formula and dairy items on sale, the state says. Pennsylvania CVS Pharmacy LLC has also agreed to pay $450,000 to settle an investigation by the Health Care Section of the state Attorney General's office, which found the company "violated a 2010 agreement in which it agreed to address concerns related to the sale of expired over-the-counter drugs, infant formula and dairyproducts," according to a statement by state Attorney General Kathleen Kane.
NEWS
March 14, 2015 | By Angelo Fichera, Inquirer Staff Writer
A deal in Washington Township between elected officials and school leaders may help temper opposition to a housing and commercial project initiated seven years ago. The township council approved a measure Wednesday to allocate 44 percent of the revenue from a proposed tax agreement for the Washington Square redevelopment project to the school district. Resistance to the project from residents and school officials has centered on concerns that the planned housing components and a payment-in-lieu-of-taxes (PILOT)
NEWS
January 22, 2015 | BY MORGAN ZALOT, Daily News Staff Writer zalotm@phillynews.com, 215-854-5928
IT TURNS OUT when you rent a ritzy Society Hill condo to your mistress and let her pay for it with sex - as a lawsuit alleges a high-powered Brooklyn real-estate mogul did - you probably shouldn't list your wife as a property manager. But Stuart Venner, according to a civil lawsuit filed by his wife on Friday in Philadelphia, may have made that mistake. In the suit, Grace Chang Venner alleges that her husband, a Brooklyn developer, drew up a 40-year lease last January for another woman to live in a stately, three-story brick rowhouse he bought in 2012 on Pine Street near 5th. But this wasn't just any lease, the suit claims: The agreement allegedly allowed defendant Panadda Pratomtang to rent the property for $1 a month until 2053 "in return for her providing prostitution services to Board Member, [Stuart]
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