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NEWS
October 19, 1991 | By Linda Loyd, Inquirer Staff Writer
Aaron Jones, leader of the Junior Black Mafia, and one of his top lieutenants ordered and planned the execution-style slaying of a West Philadelphia food store owner, according to testimony yesterday in Municipal Court. The slaying was ordered in retaliation for the murder of the JBM's head of operations in Southwest Philadelphia, according to Christopher Anderson, 21, who testified at a preliminary hearing. Anderson said that under orders from Jones, 29, and JBM boss Samuel Brown, 30, he and another gunman burst into Mommie's Food Market, on 54th Street near Master, Aug. 18, 1990, and opened fire, killing the shop owner, Bruce Kennedy, 26. Anderson, who said he was a JBM enforcer at the time, testified that Jones ordered Kennedy's murder and Brown helped plan it to avenge an killing of Leroy "Bucky" Davis.
NEWS
September 17, 2014 | By Harold Brubaker, Inquirer Staff Writer
A U.S. Bankruptcy Court judge "reluctantly" approved Monday a Sept. 24 auction date for the shuttered Revel Casino Hotel in Atlantic City. Judge Gloria M. Burns, who preferred to delay the auction until the following week, also approved a $3 million breakup fee for Glenn Straub, a Florida investor who has bid $90 million for the $2.4 billion Boardwalk property. "I'm not sure that extending the timing will make all that much difference" in attracting additional bidders for Revel, said Burns, who was more concerned with the auction being held on a day when the Jewish holiday Rosh Hashanah starts at sundown.
NEWS
August 30, 2011 | ASSOCIATED PRESS
SEATTLE - A Washington state judge ruled yesterday that a teenage boy can keep living with his father and a woman who killed her own young daughters in 1991. The decision came in an unusual child-custody dispute that attracted national attention because of the woman's criminal history. Kristine Cushing was found not guilty by reason of insanity after shooting her 4- and 8-year-old daughters in their sleep in California's Orange County. She served four years in a mental institution followed by a decade of psychiatric monitoring before California determined she posed no further risk and granted her an unconditional release.
NEWS
September 2, 1987 | By L. Stuart Ditzen, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Rev. George Charles Hoeh was a dynamic and well-loved Episcopal priest, a self-made millionaire and a thoroughly exuberant member of the human race. Even the detective investigating his murder remarked, "I haven't talked to anybody who didn't like him. " In his priestly life, Father Hoeh walked among the flock of his small, secure neighborhood parish in Brooklyn and served as confessor, comforter and social conscience. But he walked more dangerous paths in private life - on those frequent occasions when he abandoned Brooklyn for the relaxation of his commodious retreat in the affluent Sweetwater section of Mullica Township, N.J. It was there, on a Friday in June last year, that Father Hoeh, 58, carelessly invited home a stranger, a young man who called himself Paul and said he was from Minnesota.
BUSINESS
June 23, 2000 | By Josh Goldstein, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Genesis Health Ventures Inc., of Kennett Square, filed for Chapter 11 protection yesterday in U.S. Bankruptcy Court in Delaware, citing $1.5 billion in debts. Genesis is the fifth major nursing home company to file for bankruptcy in the last year as the industry has been battered by reimbursement reductions by Medicare. Genesis officials said that the company's 311 facilities in 15 states would continue to operate through Chapter 11 restructuring. "Chapter 11 protection ensures that employees can focus their attention on serving our customers while we restructure," Genesis's chairman and chief executive officer, Michael R. Walker, said.
NEWS
September 18, 2014 | By Claudia Vargas, Inquirer Staff Writer
Just when Mayor Nutter thought his tiffs with unions were over, a $2.88 million tug-of-war has broken out. With the ink fresh on AFSCME District Council 33's contract, leaders of the smaller municipal union, District Council 47, are asking that their members receive the same signing bonus the 9,000 members of D.C. 33 received for ratifying their contract last week: $2,800. That is $800 more than the bonus D.C. 47 negotiated for its members, about 3,600 white-collar employees, when they ratified their contract in March.
NEWS
August 24, 1994 | By Kay Raftery, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Someone's missing at St. Thomas of Villanova Church. The Rev. Anthony Michael Genovese, pastor for eight years, took a sabbatical from January through May, and returned to a new job. Although he will live at the rectory, now it is just a home base for his travels. The new pastor is the Rev. Dennis J. Harten. "There was agreement between myself and my provincial that I would not come back and I would use my time away to reflect on what I wanted to do," Father Mickey, as he is known, said of his discussion with the regional supervisor of the Order of St. Augustine.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 17, 2014 | By Peter Dobrin, Inquirer Culture Writer
For a rare-book aficionado interested in seeing the tiny handmade dummy books Maurice Sendak fashioned to try out ideas, or for a casual fan curious about the Sendak inside jokes that appeared in early versions of well-known books before disappearing on the way to the publisher, the best place to go for decades has been 2008 Delancey Place in Philadelphia. It has been, in fact, the only place to see a great many specific items that Sendak began placing at the Rosenbach Museum and Library, a treasure house of literary rarities, in 1968.
NEWS
October 28, 2011 | By Annette John-Hall, Inquirer Columnist
OK, this is really getting ridiculous. When last we polished off a plate of oxtails at the Jamaican Jerk Hut, the venerable Caribbean eatery at 15th and South, owner Lisa Wilson was still waging a David-and-Goliath battle with residents of Symphony House, a 32-story luxury condominium complex at Broad and Spruce. Never mind that the Zoning Board of Adjustment and Common Pleas Court had both ruled in the Jerk Hut's favor: Namely, that Wilson could play live reggae music for her customers on the lot next to the restaurant on weekends in spring and summer.
NEWS
May 1, 1989 | By Walter F. Naedele, Inquirer Staff Writer
Now there are none. The last amusement park in the Pennsylvania suburbs of Philadelphia has died. The corpse is West Point Park, near Lansdale in Montgomery County. It's just a small place down a side road, an old place under a tall stand of old trees. In Montgomery County, West Point has died. In Bucks County, Sesame Place lives. But the Pennsylvania Bureau of Amusement Rides and Attractions - the state agency that regulates such things - has defined Sesame Place in Langhorne as a "kiddie ride operation," not an amusement park.
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