CollectionsAgreement
IN THE NEWS

Agreement

NEWS
February 20, 2014 | By Barbara Boyer, Inquirer Staff Writer
MOUNT HOLLY Temeshia McDonald of Mount Holly lived well, with a high-end wardrobe, a 2012 Cadillac, and cosmetic surgery, according to court records. Among the 29-year-old's indulgences were sprees at Victoria's Secret, where she reportedly spent $355,545, federal authorities said, including $63,000 in merchandise and gift cards in just two months in 2012. On Tuesday, McDonald appeared in U.S. District Court in Newark, N.J., where she was sentenced to three years in prison and ordered to pay $557,690 in restitution after pleading guilty to fraud.
NEWS
October 19, 1991 | By Linda Loyd, Inquirer Staff Writer
Aaron Jones, leader of the Junior Black Mafia, and one of his top lieutenants ordered and planned the execution-style slaying of a West Philadelphia food store owner, according to testimony yesterday in Municipal Court. The slaying was ordered in retaliation for the murder of the JBM's head of operations in Southwest Philadelphia, according to Christopher Anderson, 21, who testified at a preliminary hearing. Anderson said that under orders from Jones, 29, and JBM boss Samuel Brown, 30, he and another gunman burst into Mommie's Food Market, on 54th Street near Master, Aug. 18, 1990, and opened fire, killing the shop owner, Bruce Kennedy, 26. Anderson, who said he was a JBM enforcer at the time, testified that Jones ordered Kennedy's murder and Brown helped plan it to avenge an killing of Leroy "Bucky" Davis.
BUSINESS
July 20, 2014 | By Jane M. Von Bergen, Inquirer Staff Writer
Union carpenters shut out of work at the Pennsylvania Convention Center picketed the facility Friday and said they will protest every day next week when the National Association of Letter Carriers union (NALC) holds its convention. The protest will put unionized letter carriers in the position of deciding whether to cross a picket line to attend convention sessions. However, despite overtures from the Metropolitan Regional Council of Carpenters, the letter carriers union declined to cancel their convention - one of the city's largest this year, with an expected economic impact of $24.8 million.
NEWS
August 30, 2011 | ASSOCIATED PRESS
SEATTLE - A Washington state judge ruled yesterday that a teenage boy can keep living with his father and a woman who killed her own young daughters in 1991. The decision came in an unusual child-custody dispute that attracted national attention because of the woman's criminal history. Kristine Cushing was found not guilty by reason of insanity after shooting her 4- and 8-year-old daughters in their sleep in California's Orange County. She served four years in a mental institution followed by a decade of psychiatric monitoring before California determined she posed no further risk and granted her an unconditional release.
NEWS
September 2, 1987 | By L. Stuart Ditzen, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Rev. George Charles Hoeh was a dynamic and well-loved Episcopal priest, a self-made millionaire and a thoroughly exuberant member of the human race. Even the detective investigating his murder remarked, "I haven't talked to anybody who didn't like him. " In his priestly life, Father Hoeh walked among the flock of his small, secure neighborhood parish in Brooklyn and served as confessor, comforter and social conscience. But he walked more dangerous paths in private life - on those frequent occasions when he abandoned Brooklyn for the relaxation of his commodious retreat in the affluent Sweetwater section of Mullica Township, N.J. It was there, on a Friday in June last year, that Father Hoeh, 58, carelessly invited home a stranger, a young man who called himself Paul and said he was from Minnesota.
BUSINESS
June 23, 2000 | By Josh Goldstein, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Genesis Health Ventures Inc., of Kennett Square, filed for Chapter 11 protection yesterday in U.S. Bankruptcy Court in Delaware, citing $1.5 billion in debts. Genesis is the fifth major nursing home company to file for bankruptcy in the last year as the industry has been battered by reimbursement reductions by Medicare. Genesis officials said that the company's 311 facilities in 15 states would continue to operate through Chapter 11 restructuring. "Chapter 11 protection ensures that employees can focus their attention on serving our customers while we restructure," Genesis's chairman and chief executive officer, Michael R. Walker, said.
NEWS
August 24, 1994 | By Kay Raftery, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Someone's missing at St. Thomas of Villanova Church. The Rev. Anthony Michael Genovese, pastor for eight years, took a sabbatical from January through May, and returned to a new job. Although he will live at the rectory, now it is just a home base for his travels. The new pastor is the Rev. Dennis J. Harten. "There was agreement between myself and my provincial that I would not come back and I would use my time away to reflect on what I wanted to do," Father Mickey, as he is known, said of his discussion with the regional supervisor of the Order of St. Augustine.
NEWS
May 1, 1989 | By Walter F. Naedele, Inquirer Staff Writer
Now there are none. The last amusement park in the Pennsylvania suburbs of Philadelphia has died. The corpse is West Point Park, near Lansdale in Montgomery County. It's just a small place down a side road, an old place under a tall stand of old trees. In Montgomery County, West Point has died. In Bucks County, Sesame Place lives. But the Pennsylvania Bureau of Amusement Rides and Attractions - the state agency that regulates such things - has defined Sesame Place in Langhorne as a "kiddie ride operation," not an amusement park.
NEWS
November 29, 2000 | By Zlati Meyer, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
The parents of 2-year-old Morgan Lee Pena, killed by a cellphone-dialing driver in Hilltown Township last year, have settled a lawsuit against the motorist, a lawyer for the parents said last night. Attorney Christopher C. Fallon Jr. said he could not comment on terms of the settlement because of a confidentiality agreement. "I can tell you it was resolved to the satisfaction of the parties," he said. The settlement was reached on Monday, 11 months to the day after Hilltown became the second municipality in the United States to outlaw cellphone use while driving.
BUSINESS
April 5, 2001 | By Bob Fernandez INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The crisis at Zany Brainy Inc. is deepening. With the King of Prussia retailer's cash almost gone, a major toy supplier said yesterday that it had halted shipments to Zany Brainy warehouses until the company solved its most pressing problem: finding a willing banker within two weeks. First Union Corp. froze Zany's credit line last month, and raised the interest rate on its outstanding loans, saying Zany was in default. The bank first became troubled after it inventoried the toys in Zany's warehouses, and placed a lower value on them than it had expected.
« Prev | 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
|
|
|
|
|