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NEWS
September 2, 1987 | By L. Stuart Ditzen, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Rev. George Charles Hoeh was a dynamic and well-loved Episcopal priest, a self-made millionaire and a thoroughly exuberant member of the human race. Even the detective investigating his murder remarked, "I haven't talked to anybody who didn't like him. " In his priestly life, Father Hoeh walked among the flock of his small, secure neighborhood parish in Brooklyn and served as confessor, comforter and social conscience. But he walked more dangerous paths in private life - on those frequent occasions when he abandoned Brooklyn for the relaxation of his commodious retreat in the affluent Sweetwater section of Mullica Township, N.J. It was there, on a Friday in June last year, that Father Hoeh, 58, carelessly invited home a stranger, a young man who called himself Paul and said he was from Minnesota.
BUSINESS
June 23, 2000 | By Josh Goldstein, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Genesis Health Ventures Inc., of Kennett Square, filed for Chapter 11 protection yesterday in U.S. Bankruptcy Court in Delaware, citing $1.5 billion in debts. Genesis is the fifth major nursing home company to file for bankruptcy in the last year as the industry has been battered by reimbursement reductions by Medicare. Genesis officials said that the company's 311 facilities in 15 states would continue to operate through Chapter 11 restructuring. "Chapter 11 protection ensures that employees can focus their attention on serving our customers while we restructure," Genesis's chairman and chief executive officer, Michael R. Walker, said.
NEWS
August 24, 1994 | By Kay Raftery, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Someone's missing at St. Thomas of Villanova Church. The Rev. Anthony Michael Genovese, pastor for eight years, took a sabbatical from January through May, and returned to a new job. Although he will live at the rectory, now it is just a home base for his travels. The new pastor is the Rev. Dennis J. Harten. "There was agreement between myself and my provincial that I would not come back and I would use my time away to reflect on what I wanted to do," Father Mickey, as he is known, said of his discussion with the regional supervisor of the Order of St. Augustine.
FOOD
March 10, 2014 | By Craig LaBan, Inquirer Restaurant Critic
The next big show at the Kimmel Center is going to be one of its most expensive tickets: dinner. The performers? Celebrity Iron Chef Jose Garces and his team. The set? Volvér, a much-awaited jewel box dining room in the Kimmel Center. And not only will its tasting menus instantly become the city's priciest meal, with food alone fluctuating between $150 and $250, it will also become Philly's first restaurant to sell those seats online as a "ticketed experience," prepaid and nonrefundable.
NEWS
May 1, 1989 | By Walter F. Naedele, Inquirer Staff Writer
Now there are none. The last amusement park in the Pennsylvania suburbs of Philadelphia has died. The corpse is West Point Park, near Lansdale in Montgomery County. It's just a small place down a side road, an old place under a tall stand of old trees. In Montgomery County, West Point has died. In Bucks County, Sesame Place lives. But the Pennsylvania Bureau of Amusement Rides and Attractions - the state agency that regulates such things - has defined Sesame Place in Langhorne as a "kiddie ride operation," not an amusement park.
NEWS
November 29, 2000 | By Zlati Meyer, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
The parents of 2-year-old Morgan Lee Pena, killed by a cellphone-dialing driver in Hilltown Township last year, have settled a lawsuit against the motorist, a lawyer for the parents said last night. Attorney Christopher C. Fallon Jr. said he could not comment on terms of the settlement because of a confidentiality agreement. "I can tell you it was resolved to the satisfaction of the parties," he said. The settlement was reached on Monday, 11 months to the day after Hilltown became the second municipality in the United States to outlaw cellphone use while driving.
SPORTS
January 13, 2014 | By Matt Gelb, Inquirer Staff Writer
This was a moment for the Phillies to keep pace with their competitors, David Montgomery said. But Montgomery, the Phillies president, oversees a team that encountered few financial threats in the National League until the Los Angeles Dodgers unshackled themselves from destructive ownership. The Phillies just signed a 25-year deal with Comcast SportsNet that will pay them more than $2.5 billion, and Montgomery used the occasion to say his Phillies should continue to rank in the top five of Major League Baseball's payrolls, as they have for each of the last four seasons.
BUSINESS
April 5, 2001 | By Bob Fernandez INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The crisis at Zany Brainy Inc. is deepening. With the King of Prussia retailer's cash almost gone, a major toy supplier said yesterday that it had halted shipments to Zany Brainy warehouses until the company solved its most pressing problem: finding a willing banker within two weeks. First Union Corp. froze Zany's credit line last month, and raised the interest rate on its outstanding loans, saying Zany was in default. The bank first became troubled after it inventoried the toys in Zany's warehouses, and placed a lower value on them than it had expected.
SPORTS
March 7, 2012 | DAILY NEWS WIRE REPORTS
THE BRITISH government has rejected advice from its Olympic team's top doctor that athletes should not shake hands at the London Games to avoid germs that could make them sick. Government health advisers seemed perplexed by the guidelines, put forth yesterday, which Olympic hopefuls derided as "rude" and "pointless. " By the end of the day, the British Olympic Association had softened its stance. Yes, the athletes will be able to greet the 10,000 visiting Olympians and hundreds of dignitaries with handshakes.
NEWS
April 18, 2014 | By Martha Woodall, Inquirer Staff Writer
MOUNT AIRY After 18 months of frustration over their inability to obtain a new contract, teachers at Khepera Charter School in Mount Airy have unanimously voted to authorize negotiators to call a strike if necessary. Teachers said they hope they won't go on strike. If they do, it would be a first. None of the handful of charter schools that are unionized in Pennsylvania has had one. The 26 teachers and counselors at Khepera represented by the Alliance of Charter School Employees, Local 6056, voted April 2 to give negotiators the power to call a strike.
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