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Agreement

NEWS
August 13, 1989 | By Nancy Phillips, Inquirer Staff Writer
The road to Baughman Farm is shady and narrow, winding past country estates to an unspoiled tract in the heart of pastoral Charlestown Township. The farm is prime Chester County land - 59 acres so desirable that some of the area's most prominent residents are battling to control it. The fight has soured longstanding friendships and led to a lawsuit filled with allegations of chicanery and malice. On one side of the court battle are Arnold Bartschi, the elderly millionaire who owns the land, and Henriette Bumeder, his beautiful longtime companion, 36 years his junior.
NEWS
May 8, 2014 | BY JENNY DeHUFF, Daily News Staff Writer dehuffj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5218
THE TEAMSTERS and carpenters who set up exhibits at the Pennsylvania Convention Center could find themselves out of work by Saturday, after refusing yesterday to sign a labor agreement that changes their work rules. Four of the six convention-center unions agreed to a new deal, giving exhibitors more freedom in choosing how their displays are set up and who does what work in the process. The move came after years of dwindling bookings at the center, which was supposed to draw conventions on an international scale.
NEWS
May 23, 2013 | By Stephan Salisbury, Inquirer Culture Writer
As the result of a historic agreement between the New York Public Library and the State of Pennsylvania, the National Constitution Center will exhibit one of the original copies of the Bill of Rights that President George Washington dispatched to the states in 1789 for ratification. Pennsylvania and the library will jointly care for and display the document for the next century. Announcement of the agreement is set for a Wednesday news conference at the center on Independence Mall.
NEWS
July 23, 2013
JERUSALEM - Israeli and Palestinian officials voiced skepticism yesterday that they can move toward a peace deal, as the sides inched toward what may be the first round of significant negotiations in five years. U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry announced late last week that an agreement has been reached that establishes the basis for resuming peace talks. He cautioned that such an agreement still needs to be formalized, suggesting that gaps remain. In his first on-camera comment yesterday, Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu appeared to lower expectations by saying the talks will be tough and any agreement would have to be ratified by Israelis in a national referendum.
NEWS
September 28, 2004 | By Kathleen Brady Shea INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
QVC show host Lisa Robertson has a tenacious fan club - evident by the growing number of court cases she generates. Yesterday, the third in a string of overly determined admirers learned that obsessing over the former Miss Tennessee costs more than the products she pitches on the home-shopping network. The price for Peter Ferreira: 132 days in Chester County Prison on a stalking charge. Yesterday, Ferreira, 41, of Plainfield, Conn., received credit for time served and was paroled as part of a plea agreement accepted by Chester County Court Judge Paula Francisco Ott. Ferreira must also spend three years on probation and receive a mental-health evaluation.
BUSINESS
May 20, 1989 | By Richard Burke, Inquirer Staff Writer
A Philadelphia company yesterday accused Dun & Bradstreet Inc. of using a "nationwide pattern of fraud" to dupe customers into buying more credit information than they needed. Frank Sussman Co., a wholesale clothing distributor in Old City, charged that Dun & Bradstreet, a New York financial-information services company, "taught" its salesmen how to mislead customers and that it fired those who refused to participate in the alleged scheme. The allegations were contained in a lawsuit filed in U.S. District Court in Philadelphia.
NEWS
October 19, 1991 | By Linda Loyd, Inquirer Staff Writer
Aaron Jones, leader of the Junior Black Mafia, and one of his top lieutenants ordered and planned the execution-style slaying of a West Philadelphia food store owner, according to testimony yesterday in Municipal Court. The slaying was ordered in retaliation for the murder of the JBM's head of operations in Southwest Philadelphia, according to Christopher Anderson, 21, who testified at a preliminary hearing. Anderson said that under orders from Jones, 29, and JBM boss Samuel Brown, 30, he and another gunman burst into Mommie's Food Market, on 54th Street near Master, Aug. 18, 1990, and opened fire, killing the shop owner, Bruce Kennedy, 26. Anderson, who said he was a JBM enforcer at the time, testified that Jones ordered Kennedy's murder and Brown helped plan it to avenge an killing of Leroy "Bucky" Davis.
NEWS
August 30, 2011 | ASSOCIATED PRESS
SEATTLE - A Washington state judge ruled yesterday that a teenage boy can keep living with his father and a woman who killed her own young daughters in 1991. The decision came in an unusual child-custody dispute that attracted national attention because of the woman's criminal history. Kristine Cushing was found not guilty by reason of insanity after shooting her 4- and 8-year-old daughters in their sleep in California's Orange County. She served four years in a mental institution followed by a decade of psychiatric monitoring before California determined she posed no further risk and granted her an unconditional release.
NEWS
September 2, 1987 | By L. Stuart Ditzen, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Rev. George Charles Hoeh was a dynamic and well-loved Episcopal priest, a self-made millionaire and a thoroughly exuberant member of the human race. Even the detective investigating his murder remarked, "I haven't talked to anybody who didn't like him. " In his priestly life, Father Hoeh walked among the flock of his small, secure neighborhood parish in Brooklyn and served as confessor, comforter and social conscience. But he walked more dangerous paths in private life - on those frequent occasions when he abandoned Brooklyn for the relaxation of his commodious retreat in the affluent Sweetwater section of Mullica Township, N.J. It was there, on a Friday in June last year, that Father Hoeh, 58, carelessly invited home a stranger, a young man who called himself Paul and said he was from Minnesota.
BUSINESS
June 23, 2000 | By Josh Goldstein, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Genesis Health Ventures Inc., of Kennett Square, filed for Chapter 11 protection yesterday in U.S. Bankruptcy Court in Delaware, citing $1.5 billion in debts. Genesis is the fifth major nursing home company to file for bankruptcy in the last year as the industry has been battered by reimbursement reductions by Medicare. Genesis officials said that the company's 311 facilities in 15 states would continue to operate through Chapter 11 restructuring. "Chapter 11 protection ensures that employees can focus their attention on serving our customers while we restructure," Genesis's chairman and chief executive officer, Michael R. Walker, said.
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