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Agreement

NEWS
May 8, 2014 | BY JENNY DeHUFF, Daily News Staff Writer dehuffj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5218
THE TEAMSTERS and carpenters who set up exhibits at the Pennsylvania Convention Center could find themselves out of work by Saturday, after refusing yesterday to sign a labor agreement that changes their work rules. Four of the six convention-center unions agreed to a new deal, giving exhibitors more freedom in choosing how their displays are set up and who does what work in the process. The move came after years of dwindling bookings at the center, which was supposed to draw conventions on an international scale.
NEWS
September 25, 2015
D EAR ABBY: Your advice to "Poor Birth Mother in Georgia" - "Because the college-loan agreement with your daughter was verbal and wasn't put in writing, you don't have a legal means to force her to assume the loan payments" - was wrong! Verbal agreements are enforced if they can be proven to be true. Even if the daughter didn't promise to make the payments, she may be held liable for them because money provided for the benefit of another gives rise to an implied and enforceable obligation to repay it. If the statute of limitations has not run out, I think she's got a pretty good case.
NEWS
May 23, 2013 | By Stephan Salisbury, Inquirer Culture Writer
As the result of a historic agreement between the New York Public Library and the State of Pennsylvania, the National Constitution Center will exhibit one of the original copies of the Bill of Rights that President George Washington dispatched to the states in 1789 for ratification. Pennsylvania and the library will jointly care for and display the document for the next century. Announcement of the agreement is set for a Wednesday news conference at the center on Independence Mall.
NEWS
September 4, 2015 | By Jonathan Tamari, Inquirer Washington Bureau
WASHINGTON - Pennsylvania's Robert P. Casey heard from critics who invoked the Holocaust, the anguish of their ancestors, and the worry that America was opening the door to a threat to Israel's very existence. Delaware's Chris Coons, a lawyer with a master's degree from the Yale Divinity School, cited nuclear scientists, policy experts, his own reading of the international nuclear deal with Iran, and Scripture. In the end, the two Democratic senators on Tuesday vowed to support the agreement, bringing it to the brink of winning enough support to withstand congressional objections.
NEWS
February 5, 2016 | By Chris Mondics, Staff Writer
Veteran prosecutors, using such words as extraordinary and unusual, said they were puzzled by the promise by former Montgomery County District Attorney Bruce L. Castor Jr. never to prosecute comedian Bill Cosby. Such deals rarely happen, the prosecutors said, simply because it is impossible to know what new information might emerge. And when the deals do emerge, they said, it is critical to get the agreement in writing. Castor testified Tuesday at a hearing on the aggravated indecent-assault charge against Cosby that his 2005 announcement not to file criminal charges amounted to a pledge that his office, and his successors, had dropped the case forever.
BUSINESS
January 28, 2016
In the Region DuPont posts loss, plans cuts DuPont Co. , which is pursuing a merger with Dow Chemical , showed a fourth-quarter loss and announced 6,000 layoffs as it ramped up cost-cutting ahead of the proposed deal. An earlier announcement on those job cuts indicated that 1,700 of them were to be in Delaware. The Wilmington chemical company Tuesday reported a loss of $253 million, or 29 cents per share, for the quarter ending Dec. 31, compared with a profit of $683 million, or 75 cents per share, for the same period in 2014.
NEWS
July 23, 2013
JERUSALEM - Israeli and Palestinian officials voiced skepticism yesterday that they can move toward a peace deal, as the sides inched toward what may be the first round of significant negotiations in five years. U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry announced late last week that an agreement has been reached that establishes the basis for resuming peace talks. He cautioned that such an agreement still needs to be formalized, suggesting that gaps remain. In his first on-camera comment yesterday, Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu appeared to lower expectations by saying the talks will be tough and any agreement would have to be ratified by Israelis in a national referendum.
NEWS
September 28, 2004 | By Kathleen Brady Shea INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
QVC show host Lisa Robertson has a tenacious fan club - evident by the growing number of court cases she generates. Yesterday, the third in a string of overly determined admirers learned that obsessing over the former Miss Tennessee costs more than the products she pitches on the home-shopping network. The price for Peter Ferreira: 132 days in Chester County Prison on a stalking charge. Yesterday, Ferreira, 41, of Plainfield, Conn., received credit for time served and was paroled as part of a plea agreement accepted by Chester County Court Judge Paula Francisco Ott. Ferreira must also spend three years on probation and receive a mental-health evaluation.
BUSINESS
May 20, 1989 | By Richard Burke, Inquirer Staff Writer
A Philadelphia company yesterday accused Dun & Bradstreet Inc. of using a "nationwide pattern of fraud" to dupe customers into buying more credit information than they needed. Frank Sussman Co., a wholesale clothing distributor in Old City, charged that Dun & Bradstreet, a New York financial-information services company, "taught" its salesmen how to mislead customers and that it fired those who refused to participate in the alleged scheme. The allegations were contained in a lawsuit filed in U.S. District Court in Philadelphia.
NEWS
October 19, 1991 | By Linda Loyd, Inquirer Staff Writer
Aaron Jones, leader of the Junior Black Mafia, and one of his top lieutenants ordered and planned the execution-style slaying of a West Philadelphia food store owner, according to testimony yesterday in Municipal Court. The slaying was ordered in retaliation for the murder of the JBM's head of operations in Southwest Philadelphia, according to Christopher Anderson, 21, who testified at a preliminary hearing. Anderson said that under orders from Jones, 29, and JBM boss Samuel Brown, 30, he and another gunman burst into Mommie's Food Market, on 54th Street near Master, Aug. 18, 1990, and opened fire, killing the shop owner, Bruce Kennedy, 26. Anderson, who said he was a JBM enforcer at the time, testified that Jones ordered Kennedy's murder and Brown helped plan it to avenge an killing of Leroy "Bucky" Davis.
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