CollectionsAgreement
IN THE NEWS

Agreement

NEWS
February 28, 2014 | By Jennifer Lin, Inquirer Staff Writer
A two-year stalemate over the redevelopment of the Philadelphia Housing Authority's Queen Lane property occupied by a potter's field in the 18th century is finally over. The authority has entered into an agreement with neighbors and other stakeholders, promising to take special measures if any human remains are unearthed during construction. That includes "reinterring" remains, Kelvin Jeremiah, PHA's president, said Wednesday. The agreement was signed by PHA, the Department of Housing and Urban Development, the Pennsylvania historic preservation officer, and the Advisory Council on Historic Preservation.
NEWS
February 21, 2014 | By Troy Graham and Michael Matza, Inquirer Staff Writers
PHILADELPHIA Mayor Nutter is poised to sign an executive order largely ending a controversial agreement that allowed federal agents to detain undocumented immigrants arrested in the city on even minor offenses. City Councilman James F. Kenney, who called for a hearing on the policy, said letting U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) hold prisoners based on their immigration status has "a chilling effect on people who would think of coming here, documented or undocumented.
NEWS
February 6, 2014 | By Thomas Fitzgerald, Inquirer Politics Writer
PHILADELPHIA Five of the Democrats running for governor said they all want to impose a tax on natural-gas production. They promised to raise the state minimum wage, increase spending on education, and slam shut the "Delaware loophole," a quirk of tax law that allows corporations to avoid paying taxes in Pennsylvania. There was broad agreement on most policy issues when U.S. Rep. Allyson Y. Schwartz, Tom Wolf, Katie McGinty, John Hanger, and Jo Ellen Litz met Tuesday at WHYY in a forum sponsored by the public media organization and the Philadelphia Business Journal.
NEWS
January 25, 2014 | By Jennifer Lin, Inquirer Staff Writer
PHILADELPHIA A coalition of neighborhood groups operating near the proposed Provence casino project on North Broad Street has signed a pact with developer Bart Blatstein that spells out his commitments, improvement plans, and financial contributions to the community. The North Broad Community Coalition, Logan Square Neighborhood Association, West Poplar Community Development Corp., and Callowhill Neighborhood Association, and the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints signed the agreement Thursday.
NEWS
January 17, 2014 | By Jennifer Lin, Inquirer Staff Writer
PHILADELPHIA Standing on the top deck of a parking garage he hopes to replace with the Provence casino, developer Bart Blatstein on Wednesday introduced two high-profile New York chefs who want to join him as restaurant partners. TV personality Tom Colicchio of Top Chef and Manhattan restaurateur Andrew Carmellini said they would open restaurants if Blatstein's project is selected for the city's second casino license. Both chefs declared Philadelphia "a great food city. " Blatstein "didn't have to sell me very hard," said Colicchio, Top Chef's head judge and owner of the Craft restaurants in New York.
BUSINESS
January 9, 2014 | By Andrew Maykuth, Inquirer Staff Writer
One of the region's leading paving contractors, Danella Cos., has agreed to pay more than $2.3 million to settle claims that it overbilled the Philadelphia Gas Works for materials. The city's Office of Inspector General said Tuesday that it found "significant discrepancies" over three years in the amount of paving materials the Plymouth Meeting company used to patch up roadways after gas-main repairs. The investigation, undertaken at PGW's request, included more than 400 core samples of roadways.
BUSINESS
December 30, 2013 | By Bob Fernandez, Inquirer Staff Writer
The pay-TV industry, threatened with federal regulations, has plunged a stake into the electric "vampire" in your living room. After a year of negotiating, Comcast Corp., DirecTV and other TV operators agreed last week to energy-efficiency standards for set-top boxes, which can suck more electricity off the grid than wide-screen TVs. The reason: Set-top boxes don't turn off - even when a subscriber turns off the TV, or the boxes themselves....
NEWS
December 13, 2013 | BY SEAN COLLINS WALSH, Daily News Staff Writer walshSE@phillynews.com, 215-854-4172
AFTER threatening a strike, the leader of Philly's prison-healthcare-workers union has reached a tentative agreement with the company that manages treatment for the city's roughly 9,000 inmates, sources with knowledge of the negotiations said. Henry Nicholas, president of the National Union of Hospital & Health Care Employees District 1199C, is expected to present to his 270 prison workers a compromise that will include wage increases and less-generous health-care plans. If approved, the agreement would avert a strike threatened in an op-ed by Nicholas in yesterday's Inquirer . Nicholas and representatives of Corizon, a Tennessee company that the city pays $42 million per year to manage the city's prison health care, spent hours yesterday in the offices of Everett Gillison, Mayor Nutter's chief of staff.
NEWS
August 31, 2013 | By Michael Matza, Inquirer Staff Writer
The dozen demonstrators - including children whose parents face deportation - squeezed into a narrow corridor at Philadelphia City Hall. They came bearing posters urging Mayor Nutter to end the five-year-old agreement in which the city Police Department shares arrest data with the U.S. office of Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE). Kneeling in his tan suit to meet the youngsters eye-to-eye, Sgt. Michael Walton, head of the mayor's plainclothes protection unit, was gentle.
NEWS
August 23, 2013 | BY REGINA MEDINA, Daily News Staff Writer medinar@phillynews.com, 215-854-5985
THE SCHOOL REFORM Commission last night approved license agreements for five Renaissance charter schools, among other resolutions, during its last meeting before the school year begins. There were spirited speeches, a fair share of boos and frustrated audience members carrying posters criticizing the district, and a well-attended protest outside district headquarters, but last night's SRC meeting was more subdued than last week's emergency session, during which the commission unanimously voted to suspend certain sections of the state public-school code.
« Prev | 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
|
|
|
|
|