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Agricultural Land

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NEWS
August 7, 1988 | By Melinda Deanna Anderson, Special to The Inquirer
Owners of farms in West Marlborough might soon be protected from nuisance claims and encroaching development now that the Board of Supervisors has begun proceedings to have portions of the township declared an agricultural security district. Solicitor Thomas E. Martin Jr. told the board Tuesday that petitions had been received from numerous landowners in the township requesting that West Marlborough be covered under the state's Agricultural Security Act. Petitions were sent to all landowners in the township, Martin said, and residents have until Sept.
NEWS
July 19, 1998 | By Patricia M. La Hay, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
A 230-acre farm at the corner of Pineville and Brownsburg Roads is at the heart of a standoff over development in this small township. Half farmland, half woodland, the gently rolling Dutchess Farm contains wetlands, prime agricultural soil, and a house, part of which dates to 1690. Marjorie and Eldrow "Dutch" Reeve have lived there since 1974 and have cultivated the land themselves or leased it to farmers. Toll Bros., one of the largest developers of luxury houses in the nation, has an option to buy the land.
NEWS
May 29, 1996 | By Erin Mooney, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
New Britain's land preservation committee has set goals for preserving open space and hopes to present a proposal for action by the end of the year. Created in February to deal with the ever-increasing problem of development, the Land Preservation Advisory Committee has studied how other communities have dealt with land preservation in order to develop its own model for preservation. "We've taken what looks like it's in the best interest of our township," said Jim Jenkins, the chairman of the committee, after holding a handful of meetings to discuss land preservation in the central Bucks township.
NEWS
June 6, 1993 | By Marguerite P. Jones, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
It's a scenario Bucks County residents have come to expect: Farms vanish and crisp, new townhouses pop up in their place. But last month, three large Bucks County agricultural tracts, including one at Delaware Valley College, were added to the list of places where that familiar story won't be played out. The Pennsylvania Agricultural Land Preservation Board approved the purchase for a total of $2.3 million of preservation easements on the three...
NEWS
August 24, 1989 | By Larry Borska, Special to The Inquirer
Westtown officials have joined a countywide movement to preserve farmland by classifying a portion of their township an agricultural security district. The Board of Supervisors voted 3-0 during a public hearing Monday night to make Westtown the 18th municipality in the county to make such a move. The addition of Westtown's district brings the total of land in the county under agricultural protection to more than 45,000 acres. The district, which was created under Pennsylvania law, covers 1,156 acres belonging to 10 landowners.
NEWS
January 30, 2004 | By Kathleen Brady Shea and Nancy Petersen INQUIRER STAFF WRITERS
Oxford land baron James S. Pepple, who has made millions through government programs, wants more - and may get it. In 1995, Chester County paid Pepple more than $414,757 to surrender the development rights for 189 agricultural acres he owns, with his promise that they would never be used for anything but agriculture. Now, he wants to sell 99 of those acres to the Oxford Area Sewer Authority, which wants to use them to absorb 400,000 gallons of wastewater a day. In August, the Chester County Agricultural Land Preservation Board refused to approve the sale, finding that the acres of reed canary grass, which will absorb the wastewater, does not constitute an agricultural use. Yesterday, Pepple and his attorney, Mary Ann Rossi, were in Chester County Court, trying to persuade Judge Thomas G. Gavin to overturn the preservation board's decision.
NEWS
October 26, 1994 | By Eddie Olsen, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
If Jim Yates had his way, Gloucester County would preserve roughly one out of every 10 acres for open space or agricultural use. "Now is the time to prepare for the future, not after all the land has been developed," said Yates, who is in his second year as coordinator of the county's Farmland Preservation Program. Last week, the Gloucester County Board of Chosen Freeholders paved the way for the preservation of 606.36 acres of agricultural land, authorizing up to $28,500 for appraisals of seven privately owned farms in Elk and South Harrison Townships.
NEWS
May 8, 1988 | By Ellen Dean Wilson, Special to The Inquirer
Creating a land-use plan for a county that has seen its developed land double in area from 1970 to 1987 seems a huge task. But the Chester County Planning Commission is attempting just that, and Wednesday night the group presented a draft of its land-use forecasts and advice through the year 2010. The hearing, held at Brandywine Hospital, was the first of several meetings to gather comments about the draft. If the plan's final version is adopted by the Chester County Commissioners, it would become part of the county's comprehensive plan.
NEWS
June 12, 1986 | By Jane Cope, Special to The Inquirer
The Burlington County Board of Freeholders yesterday added 32 acres in Chesterfield Township to its farmland preservation program, bringing it closer to its goal of having 2,000 acres protected by the end of this year. The addition brings the total of preserved farmland throughout Burlington County to 1,546 acres. The county wants to add nearly 500 more acres by the end of 1986, Chuck Gallagher, county land-use coordinator, said after yesterday's freeholder meeting. Landowners taking part in the program promise not to develop their agricultural land for eight years.
BUSINESS
May 17, 2011
There is a scramble for farmland globally, and it turns out it is not just to grow food. Investors are discovering returns on farming land that rival those of the U.S. stock market. Some Wall Street luminaries have long been fans of farmland as part of an investment portfolio. Why? The Standard & Poor's 500-benchmark index's average annual return was 11.8 percent between 1950-2008, while the return on farmland with capital appreciation and current yield was 11.6 percent. "But the volatility of the S&P is about double that of farmland," notes Shonda Warner, manager of Chess Ag Full Harvest Partners L.L.C.
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BUSINESS
May 17, 2011
There is a scramble for farmland globally, and it turns out it is not just to grow food. Investors are discovering returns on farming land that rival those of the U.S. stock market. Some Wall Street luminaries have long been fans of farmland as part of an investment portfolio. Why? The Standard & Poor's 500-benchmark index's average annual return was 11.8 percent between 1950-2008, while the return on farmland with capital appreciation and current yield was 11.6 percent. "But the volatility of the S&P is about double that of farmland," notes Shonda Warner, manager of Chess Ag Full Harvest Partners L.L.C.
NEWS
November 9, 2005 | By Edward Colimore INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Three tracts totaling 59 acres in Voorhees, Somerdale and Clementon have been preserved as open space in the last two weeks with the help of public and private funds. The $3.3 million purchase of the 35-acre Signal Hill property in Clementon was announced this week by the borough and the nonprofit Trust for Public Land. The tract includes the historic Indian Spring at the base of Signal Hill, where Walt Whitman wrote the last part of Leaves of Grass. The site also has a system of heavily used public trails.
NEWS
November 17, 2004 | By Mitch Lipka INQUIRER TRENTON BUREAU
It might not look like it from certain angles, but New Jersey is the Garden State, or so its license plates claim. Apparently, it's a popular notion. A poll released yesterday found that residents have a Garden State of mind. Of 906 questioned for the Public Mind Poll at Fairleigh Dickinson University, 85 percent said farming should play a valuable role in New Jersey's future. "It could very well be there is perhaps this romantic notion that farming is very much what New Jersey is about," said John W. Schiemann, director of research for Public Mind.
NEWS
January 30, 2004 | By Kathleen Brady Shea and Nancy Petersen INQUIRER STAFF WRITERS
Oxford land baron James S. Pepple, who has made millions through government programs, wants more - and may get it. In 1995, Chester County paid Pepple more than $414,757 to surrender the development rights for 189 agricultural acres he owns, with his promise that they would never be used for anything but agriculture. Now, he wants to sell 99 of those acres to the Oxford Area Sewer Authority, which wants to use them to absorb 400,000 gallons of wastewater a day. In August, the Chester County Agricultural Land Preservation Board refused to approve the sale, finding that the acres of reed canary grass, which will absorb the wastewater, does not constitute an agricultural use. Yesterday, Pepple and his attorney, Mary Ann Rossi, were in Chester County Court, trying to persuade Judge Thomas G. Gavin to overturn the preservation board's decision.
NEWS
April 13, 2001 | By Lee Drutman INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Four million dollars may seem like a lot of money for farmland preservation. But in Montgomery County, that is only enough for six farms a year, just a third of all that applied for preservation status in 2001. Elizabeth Emlen, the county's farmland-preservation coordinator, says that is not enough. If only six farms can be preserved with a combination of county and state funding, she says, 12 farms could fall to development, compromising the rural character of towns such as Douglass and Salford and Franconia.
NEWS
July 19, 1998 | By Patricia M. La Hay, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
A 230-acre farm at the corner of Pineville and Brownsburg Roads is at the heart of a standoff over development in this small township. Half farmland, half woodland, the gently rolling Dutchess Farm contains wetlands, prime agricultural soil, and a house, part of which dates to 1690. Marjorie and Eldrow "Dutch" Reeve have lived there since 1974 and have cultivated the land themselves or leased it to farmers. Toll Bros., one of the largest developers of luxury houses in the nation, has an option to buy the land.
NEWS
August 29, 1996 | By Louis S. Hansen, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
As part of the continuing county effort to preserve open space and the family farm, the Montgomery County Agricultural Land Preservation Board yesterday voted to approve $2.4 million to buy the development rights to six farms. If the offers are accepted, 695 acres in Douglass, Upper Frederick, Lower Salford and Upper Hanover Townships will be preserved as working farmland. Although most of the farms chosen are in the western end of the county, county agricultural planner Sue R. Costello said, "the board is open to looking at farms in all areas.
NEWS
May 29, 1996 | By Erin Mooney, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
New Britain's land preservation committee has set goals for preserving open space and hopes to present a proposal for action by the end of the year. Created in February to deal with the ever-increasing problem of development, the Land Preservation Advisory Committee has studied how other communities have dealt with land preservation in order to develop its own model for preservation. "We've taken what looks like it's in the best interest of our township," said Jim Jenkins, the chairman of the committee, after holding a handful of meetings to discuss land preservation in the central Bucks township.
NEWS
October 26, 1994 | By Eddie Olsen, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
If Jim Yates had his way, Gloucester County would preserve roughly one out of every 10 acres for open space or agricultural use. "Now is the time to prepare for the future, not after all the land has been developed," said Yates, who is in his second year as coordinator of the county's Farmland Preservation Program. Last week, the Gloucester County Board of Chosen Freeholders paved the way for the preservation of 606.36 acres of agricultural land, authorizing up to $28,500 for appraisals of seven privately owned farms in Elk and South Harrison Townships.
NEWS
April 21, 1994 | By Eddie Olsen,INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
By a vote of 7-0, the Gloucester County Board of Chosen Freeholders last night approved a bond ordinance authorizing $1 million for a program to preserve open space and agricultural land. The ordinance was approved without comment after a public hearing. "I feel good about getting this program underway," said Freeholder Director James G. Atkinson. "It has had good support from farmers as well as environmentalists. The feedback has been very positive. People want us to protect the county from too much development.
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